Posts Tagged ‘Performance’

The Texas band’s rock music is a vintage kind, an effortless, guitar infectious music that recalls the best of the best while maintaining its own steam. Their new album Performance just dropped and its their eighth album of solid tunes.

Great rock music is, above all things, a ton of fun. Texas band White Denim understand and live by this code. Just listen to their new album Performance. It’s nine songs of pure, unadulterated rock&roll. Packed with funk rhythms and guitar riffs so sharp you could cut glass with them.

‘Double Death’ is one highlight among many, the breakdown section in which could only ever be the product of four-lifetime professional musicians and ardent lovers of the genre. It’s a relentless project, album closer and heartstring puller ‘Good News’ is the closest we ever get to a ballad or downtempo number. Even that is not without its share of distorted guitars and accented drum patterns. It’s worth noting that the guitar solo in this song is perhaps the group’s finest to date. Howling fuzz against a wall of sound.

The album doesn’t suffer from a lack of variety, despite its unyielding high-octane sound. Some tracks, like ‘Performance’ are straight up rock songs. Others like ‘Double Death’ include aspects of classic funk acts like The Meters .

There’s plenty of southern rock influence to be heard too, check out the jubilant ‘It Might Get Dark’. Performance is a perfectly consistent rock record, one which is totally comfortable with what it is. Experimentation is all well and good, but White Denim have again proven once again that raw talent and unmatched songwriting skill is a rewarding well.

From the new album ‘Performance’ – OUT NOW

White Denim on later with Jools Holland TV show

One of the most prolific American psychedelic rock and roll bands are back at it on their 7th LP, the City Slang-released Performance. White Denim are an Austin staple and have come to represent the sound of the city over the years through James Petralli’s sleek guitars, Steve Terebecki’s bass groove and Petralli’s seemingly impossible vocal range. The album’s early singles harken back to the band’s finest material, especially “It Might Get Dark,” a bluesy jam with a flawless melody that is just a flat-out fun endeavor for the ears.

The Austin quartet have long pulled hard at the parameters of rock & roll, admitting garage punk, soul, psychedelia, prog, jazz and blues while holding onto its vital goodtime core. Their up-tempo drive has produced a body of work defined as much by stellar musicianship as off-the-chain exhilaration. Energy and adventurism have always been paramount.

Here are nine songs with clarity and renewed purpose as well as a truckload of attitude. A new studio, new collaborators, and new techniques for writing and recording influenced the elastic possibility and liberation felt throughout.
Theirs is music that aims for the whole body, while equally satisfying the mind. While it has morphed, expanded, and even burst apart, White Denim’s sincere, human drive and ability to spark true exhilaration have been unerring constants of the band’s existence. Ever progressing, never content to camp out on a plateau of their creative accomplishments, there is no other band quite like White Denim – unique in talent and legendarily potent as a live band, they are quite simply a very special band.

It’s safe to say when City Slang releases a record everyone listens, with White Denim now the newest Texan contingent filling the ranks of the German label. Following a longplayer this year from Calexico outta Tucson, White Denim bring the sound of Austin to the label by delivering their ninth long player in ten years. Like the artwork of performance, the music is a colourful montage that brings together saxxy jazz, mellow tropicana and distorted garage to psych rock and pop, with melancholic vocals only adding to its unique cross section of colours. A highlight for us is the ’70s Biker rock of “It Might Get Dark” and finger snappin’, vibrato heavy “Moves On”.

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Austin rockers White Denim have announced they will release their seventh full-length album, Performance, on August 24th via their new label City Slang Records, with whom the band recently signed.

The group has also shared the album’s first single, the thumping, strutting “Magazin,” which can be heard in the  below, along with also announcing a batch of fall USA tour dates, more sandwiched between two European runs.

See White Denim’s tour schedule below.

August 28 – London, UK – Rough Trade East
August 29 – London, UK – Moth Club
August 31 – Vlieland, NL – Into the Great Wide Open
September 2 – Larmer Tree Gardens, UK – End of the Road Festival

Taken from the new album PERFORMANCE

Talking headbostonteparty

Available now from Amazon, these two cd set are the same show Featuring an excellent radio broadcast from Talking Heads in August 1979 when, back on home turf in Boston, Massachusetts, the band played a rip roaring set to those smart enough to have bought a ticket and those lucky enough to have been living in the greater Boston vicinity to whom local FM radio transmitted the entire proceedings. Included as bonus tracks on this disc are the two cuts the group had played on Saturday Night live a few months before, which in completion, make for a superb package of Talking Heads music from a time when this ground breaking collective were the hottest thing around and the name on every hipsters lips.

talking heads boston

Recorded at The Berklee School of Music, Boston 24th August 1979. FM Broadcast. The 1979 Talking Heads tour, promoting the release of their “Fear Of Music” album, would be the last to feature the stripped down quartet lineup and the first to gain them significantly more exposure in America. They had established themselves in Europe, America was just catching on to what an intriguing and captivating live band they were. one of the wildest and most memorable performances on this breakthrough tour. With the original B52’s opening this show, there was plenty of momentum before The Heads even hit the stage. This, combined with playing before an intelligent and relatively home turf audience, ignited an inspired performance. These excerpts, originally broadcast via the King Biscuit Flower Hour, capture several highlights from this memorable night. The band’s sound was clearly evolving, containing more complex rhythmic structures and song arrangements. The new songs had increasingly funny, yet even more thought-provoking lyrics. The overt awkwardness that frontman David Byrne often displayed onstage was just beginning to be perceived as the uninhibited expression that it really was, with many now dancing to it. His unusual vocal affectations were engaging and the music was clearly beginning to resonate more deeply, particularly in a live context. “Stay Hungry” begins the recording in a somewhat ominous style, with Jerry Harrison‘s keyboards adding even creepier textures than the album version. “Cities,” a track from Fear Of Music follows. It’s a galloping romp through Byrne’s stream of consciousness thoughts about city life. The last three tracks are all classics and equally fantastic performances. First up is a thoroughly engaging rendition of the non-album single side “(My Love Goes To A) Building On Fire.” The “Psycho Killer” that closes this set is outstanding, featuring Byrne firmly in the land of no self-consciousness and the entire group ripping into a wild jam with Byrne and Harrison both blazing on guitars. (Think of the heavy psychedelic fuzz guitar jam in the middle of The Chambers Brothers “Time Has Come Today” and you wouldn’t be far off). Following an ecstatic audience demanding more, they return for an encore of their unique take on Al Green’s “Take Me To The River”. Originally a gospel number, Talking Heads completely redefine the song and in the process make it their own. Shortly after this tour, Talking Heads would begin overtly expanding their musical parameters. Their studio recordings would soon reach an unparalleled intensity (and density) on their next album. They would make truly inspired choices at augmenting the stage band, without diluting any of their originality. With the help of MTV and its heavy rotation of the music video for “Once In A Lifetime” the following year, the band’s music would reach a much broader audience.