Posts Tagged ‘Sandgrown’

Jack Cooper is a musician & songwriter living in London, England. He is currently a member of the band Ultimate Painting. “Sandgrown” is his first album as a solo artist. He says of the cover, “I was selling merch at the last show of my US tour and a guy who had bought a record told me that the live band sounded like Meddle-era Pink Floyd. In hindsight I should’ve hugged him because as far as compliments go, that’s the best I’ve ever had. I think that post-Syd and pre-Dark Side Pink Floyd were such an interesting band… weird, English, pastoral, loose, economic and occasionally perfect. I love Syd Barrett and most things up to The Wall but I think that mid-era is the most fascinating. I love recording covers and in learning this I gained some fresh perspective on simplicity.”

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Buy a copy of Jack Cooper’s solo album “Sandgrown”: www.troubleinmindrecs.com/jack-cooper-sandgrown/
Catch Jack live, on tour in the UK:

Jan. 28 – Brighton, UK @ The Hope
Jan. 29 – Bristol, UK @ Louisiana
Jan. 30 – Leeds, UK @ Oporto
Jan. 31 – Glasgow, UK @ Broadcast
Feb. 1 – Manchester, UK @ Soup Kitchen
Feb. 2 – London, UK @ Garage

Lagniappe (la·gniappe) noun ˈlan-ˌyap,’ – 1. An extra or unexpected gift or benefit. 2. Something given or obtained as a gratuity or bonus.

Earlier this year Ultimate Painting’s Jack Cooper slid us an early version of his new solo album, “Sandgrown”. At nine tracks we were immediately drawn to its sparse, tranquil, yet personal offerings inspired by his hometown of Blackpool off the coast of England. The effort finds Cooper waxing nostalgic about his time growing up on the Fylde Coast and the cast of characters that come with living and working in a seasonal resort town. Often compared to the Velvets, Sandgrown finds Cooper acknowledging other influences including Terry Allen and The Grateful Dead, mixing them with the experimental textures of John Cale and Robert Wyatt.

Jack Cooper :: Blood Dries Darker (Woods)

Woods have a special place in my heart because my wife and I are both big fans and we always listen to them together. I first saw them in 2008 in Manchester and it’s been a pleasure seeing them so many times since then. This is my favourite song of theirs and although they never really play it, Jarvis dedicated it to my wife and I last time they played London. It’s a pretty perfect song.

Jack Cooper :: Lubbock Woman (Terry Allen)

Terry Allen’s Lubbock (On Everything) was a big influence in this solo album of mine. The framework of writing about a town or place opens up a world of possibilities. I’ve been writing about Blackpool since I lived there but the idea to do something centered on that was really inspired by this record and Watertown by Frank Sinatra. The words and the delivery is all about Terry, so it felt weird singing them. I scrapped the idea 4 or 5 times, before thinking ‘fuck it’… it’s a great song.

Jack Cooper :: For A While (Frank Sinatra)

Frank Sinatra’s Watertown is just the most melancholic, downbeat, comforting record I’ve ever heard. It’s his best album and his finest acting performance. Again…the delivery and words are all about him but I gave it a good shot. My friend Phil Anderson recorded some piano for me…it’s blown out and weird.

Jack Cooper :: Black Peter (Grateful Dead)

I’m not too sure why I chose this apart from being a huge fan of the Grateful Dead. Robert Hunter was on fire around this time…such rich, interesting imagery and narratives. I really can’t think of a better lyricist, and around this time in particular.

Jack Cooper :: Big Louise (Scott Walker)

Most of these songs I’ll class as misses, in that they’re all so hard to do justice too. The vocalists are way too singular and this one in particular I’ve included just for the hell of it. The phrasing and way he sings is so incredibly complicated. I couldn’t even begin to get right. I’ve listened back to all of these at some point and become to self conscious about even submitting them (laughs). I guess there’s something liberating about taking a shot at something and just going with it.

Ultimate Painting’s Jack Cooper released his debut solo album recently on Trouble In Mind Records.  The album “Sandgrown”, released last month via Trouble In Mind Records, is a sparse yet hypnotic listening, Its a record inspired by Cooper’s coastal hometown of Blackpool, England. Jack comments on the record ,  I think part of the reason I’ve made this record is a way of processing the past and where I am now. Like, what the hell is this? Going back to your original point, I think it references every stage of my life and the “Blackpool” of the album is just a frame in which I can tell stories, be self-indulgent and self-analytical, process memories or try and recreate places and feelings. It’s the first time I’ve sort of set myself a framework and it was weirdly liberating.

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Taken from “Sandgrown”, the debut solo album from Ultimate Painting’s Jack Cooper. Released August 25th, 2017 via Trouble In Mind Records 

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Image of Jack Cooper - Sandgrown

Jack Cooper of Ultimate Painting’s fi­rst solo record is 9 concisely beautiful songs inspired by his hometown of Blackpool and his upbringing on England’s Fylde Coast. “Everyone’s from somewhere,” says Jack. “I don’t think it’s particularly important people know this album is about Blackpool, but I think everyone can empathise with the themes on the record.” Evoking the delicate but often widescreen musicality of Bill Fay and the abstract lyricism of the late 60s Scott Walker records, as well as the more experimental sounds of John Cale and Robert Wyatt, Sandgrown is a collection of tranquil ballads that evoke feelings of nostalgia and re-evaluation about where you come from, wherever that may be.

Jack spent the fi­rst 13 years of his life living in the rural village of Poulton-le- Fylde, about ­ve miles outside Blackpool. On moving into town, he spent his summers as a deckchair attendant. “There were just a lot of interesting people around all the time… weirdos who were drawn to the seaside in the summer. Winter would come and you had this huge community of people who didn’t really know what to do.” By the time Jack was 15, Blackpool’s role as a holiday destination was dwindling due to the introduction of cheap air travel to Europe. Stacks of deckchairs were increasingly left unused, and in the winter months it became a place of drugs, seedy bars and people struggling to get by without the tourist trade. As the Blackpool he knew slipped away, 20-year- old Jack moved to Manchester where he began playing in bands and recording. Sandgrown is about those formative years and the creation of it – “I’ve been trying to do this record since I was about 18… I bought my ­rst 4-track with the proceeds of a summer working on the promenade and I guess I got sidetracked along the way. I’ve been listening to Terry Allen’s ‘Lubbock (On Everything)’ a lot and I wanted to make something that painted a picture of a place as vividly as that. I love how Frank Sinatra’s ‘Watertown’ feels so cinematic.”

Uninhibited by band members for the fi­rst time was a freeing experience for Cooper. “Recording on my own liberated me to sing more like I actually sing. I think I‘ve spent a long time in loud bands singing in a way that can be heard through music,” Jack says. “The songs that I wrote for Sandgrown suit my voice more than anything I’ve done before.” “I love the physicality of working on tape. I’ve always had a 4-track but I sought out a particular machine. I’m not a huge Bruce Springsteen fan but I love the sound of Nebraska… I needed that speci­c machine.

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Taken from “Sandgrown”, the debut solo album from Ultimate Painting’s Jack Cooper. Released August 25th, 2017 via Trouble In Mind Records.  “Sandgrown” is Jack Cooper’s first solo record with nine concisely beautiful songs inspired by his hometown of Blackpool and his upbringing on England’s Fylde Coast.

“Everyone’s from somewhere,” says Jack. “I don’t think it’s particularly important people know this album is about Blackpool, but I think everyone can empathize with the themes on the record.” Evoking the delicate but often widescreen musicality of Bill Fay and the abstract lyricism of the late 60s Scott Walker records, as well as the more experimental sounds of John Cale and Robert Wyatt, Sandgrown is a collection of tranquil ballads that evoke feelings of nostalgia and re-evaluation about where you come from, wherever that may be.

http://

 Sandgrown is about his formative years and the creation of it – “I’ve been trying to do this record since I was about 18… I bought my first 4-track with the proceeds of a summer working on the promenade and I guess I got sidetracked along the way. I’ve been listening to Terry Allen’s ‘Lubbock (On Everything)’ a lot and I wanted to make something that painted a picture of a place as vividly as that.

http://

Uninhibited by band members for the first time was a freeing experience for Cooper. “Recording on my own liberated me to sing more like I actually sing. I think I‘ve spent a long time in loud bands singing in a way that can be heard through music,” Jack says. “The songs that I wrote for Sandgrown suit my voice more than anything I’ve done before.” Working within the confines of specific 4-track cassette machine (a Teac 144.), Jack has produced his most satisfying work to date. “I love the physicality of working on tape. I’ve always had a 4-track but I sought out a particular machine. I’m not a huge Bruce Springsteen fan but I love the sound of Nebraska… I needed that specific machine.”