Posts Tagged ‘Kelley Stoltz’

“I was guzzling wine at my favorite bar in San Francisco, the Rite Spot, and the entertainment that night was some local opera singers singing along with a big video screen showing a collage of various operatic moments with subtitles. One particular subtitle, ‘Ah! (etc)’ made me laugh, I thought it was a perfect description of life – the joy of existence against the etcetera of it all, the struggle. With a heavy head of rose’ it seemed like ecstatic poetry! I scribbled it on a napkin and thought it might make a good title for something” And so the mystery behind the title of Kelley Stoltz new record is solved. Less of a mystery is the quality contained therein… after 12 self-titled releases and a several more under pseudonyms, Stoltz is the word for “one-man-band-home-recording-pop-songs of idiosyncratic character.” A quick follow up to his more power pop and pub rock LP only “Hard Feelings” offering in the summer, “Ah!(etc)” finds Stoltz returning to his sweet spot, writing songs that never were, but should have been in the 60’s and 80’s.

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As with other LPs Stoltz makes virtually every noise on the album which was written and recorded in 2019 at his Electric Duck Studio in San Francisco. A few friends popped in to play along… Stoltz former bandmate, Echo & the Bunnymen’s Will Sergeant adds electric guitar to “The Quiet Ones” a sort of Scott Walker lyrical take on strangers and neighbours. Karina Denike formerly of Dance Hall Crashers adds gorgeous vocals on the bossanova groover “Moon Shy”, where Sergeant pops up again in a spoken word role on the outro. Allyson Baker of SF’s Dirty Ghosts sings on “She Likes Noise”, a song Stoltz wrote for her in celebration of her love of seeing live bands.

Released November 20th, 2020

Kelley Stoltz: Ah! (Etc.)

“I was guzzling wine at my favourite bar in San Francisco, the Rite Spot, and the entertainment that night was some local opera singers singing along with a big video screen showing a collage of various operatic moments with subtitles. One particular subtitle, ‘Ah!-(etc)’ made me laugh, I thought it was a perfect description of life – the joy of existence against the etcetera of it all, the struggle. With a heavy head of rose’ it seemed like ecstatic poetry! I scribbled it on a napkin and thought it might make a good title for something” And so the mystery behind the title of Kelley Stoltz new record is solved. Less of a mystery is the quality contained therein… after 12 self-titled releases and a several more under pseudonyms, Stoltz is the word for “one-man-band-home-recording-pop-songs of idiosyncratic character.”

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A quick follow up to his more power pop and pub rock LP only “Hard Feelings” offering in the summer, “Ah-(etc)” finds Stoltz returning to his sweet spot, writing songs that never were, but should have been in the 60’s and 80’s. As with other LPs Stoltz makes virtually every noise on the album which was written and recorded in 2019 at his Electric Duck Studio in. San Francisco. A few friends popped in to play along… Stoltz former bandmate, Echo & the Bunnymen’s Will Sergeant adds electric guitar to “The Quiet Ones” a sort of Scott Walker lyrical take on strangers and neighbours. Karina Denike formerly of Dance Hall Crashers adds gorgeous vocals on the bossanova groover “Moon Shy”, where Sergeant pops up again in a spoken word role on the outro. Allyson Baker of SF’s Dirty Ghosts sings on “She Like Noise”, a song Stoltz wrote for her in celebration of her love of seeing live bands.

Lead track from upcoming new Kelley Stoltz album “Ah!(etc”). Out 20th November on Agitated Records.

Kelley Stoltz, king of songs.. avatar of 80s pop done in a 60s pop fashion..and vice versa..drops (dropped) a 17 track new album for Bandcamp day, and forgot to tell us to sell our copies in..he woke, put it up, and boom…he sold out of his load on Friday… so, now its our turn.. cheers Kelley!!   He even invents a new sub-genre for his tunes..

17 Incredible tracks! This time Kelley genre plays in the POWER-PUB world, with dashes of Undertones, Stiff Records, 80’s Iggy evenly applied. A chance buy of a $75 Japanese Electric Guitar conducive only to power chords, and repeated spins of the Mick Trouble LP made for a wild week of recording this edgy delight. Recorded Fall 2019 at Electric Duck Studios SF, CA. Mastered by Sir Mikey Young. Brought to you by Chuffed Records, a Puzzling Records Company.

This delightful LP from our favourite popstar..  Beautiful black n white 50/50 color vinyl. First Pressing Limited to only 250 copies.

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Cover versions are not a new idea. Every band and their groupie have done one. Some are good Kelley Stoltz’s track for track covers album of Echo and the Bunnymen’s ‘Crocodiles’ will be available for the first time on vinyl this Record Store Day courtesey of Nine x Nixe Records.

Originally recorded in late 2001, the album was not released until 2006 and was only available on CD (Orignally a TOUR ONLY CD via Beautiful Happiness).

Crockodials is a re-envisaging of renowned Liverpool band Echo and The Bunnymen‘s 1980s album Crocodiles. Now, recording another musician’s entire album is a tad quirky. But for someone who has The Cones Project (a series of traffic cone photos) on his website, it’s not that far out. In fact, Stoltz is quite a unique guy, he plays every instrument on Crock-O-Dials (as he did on previous album Antique Glow in 2004) and personally recorded each song on 8-track, DIY fashion.

When listening to Crockodials, one question begs an answer: why Echo and The Bunnymen? Simple – the Bunnymen are one of Stoltz’s biggest influences. So what better way to pay homage? (There’s even a bunny on the album sleeve…) Crockodials opens with Going Up, an electronic drumbeat starting the song. Apt really, considering that before the Bunnymen employed the late Pete de Freitas as drummer, Echo was their drum machine.

The beautifully melancholic and haunting song Stars Are Stars is slower than the original, somehow giving its lyrics more meaning, such as: “All your dreams are hanging out to dry/Stars are stars and they shine so cold”. It also has a twangy guitar lick which adds new life to this twenty-year old song.

All That Jazz  starts off very chilled with acoustic guitars and Stoltz singing in his Bowie-esque voice, very different from the sound of the Bunnymen. It’s true to state that every song on Crockodials seems fresher, with additional eclectic sounds (such as a xylophone in Pride, and crazily fast tambourine playing in Crocodiles). Crockodials maybe a novelty, one that may pave the way for future album covers. (Perhaps even coaxing Ryan Adams to release his other cover version album of The Strokes‘ Is This It? .

Stoltz took up the mantle of rhythm guitar in the Bunnymen’s live set up in 2016, after a few high profile state-side support slots won largely because of this album. Pressed on 180g colour vinyl, with original artwork and new sleeve notes from Bunnymen guitarist Will Sergeant and Scott Kannberg (Pavement), there’s never been a better time to discover this gem from Stoltz’s back catalogue.

REMASTERED BY MIKEY YOUNG -Bonus 7″ E.P.features 3 early demos of 14 year old Kelley’s band.These are the earliest known recordings of Stoltz’s Bunnymen covers.This E.P.is exclusive to the RSD release and will not be available with any subsequent reissue.

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Silver-tongued songsmith and true American treasure Kelley Stoltz presents a new collection of instant classics with just a hint more synthery than 2013’s ‘Double Exposure’. For those not yet in the fan club, Kelley’s like a Ray Davies / Brian Wilson / Tom Petty power pop Cerebus from another dimension where well placed tambourines, handclaps, and wry observations are a universal language. Criminally under-appreciated, Kelley’s face should be on Amoeba-bucks for his contributions to the pop canon – the black-lipstick-smeared stand-out and lead-off track ‘Cut Me Baby’ could be his walk-on music for the acceptance speech. Each track here leaps off the table with Kelley’s carefully considered wit and expertly layered arrangements. His innate way around a sticky hook and no shortage of tasty studio flourishes will bring out the listener’s inner record nerd, guaranteed. It’s got a little glam in it and it’s out on Castle Face too.

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The Silver-tongued songsmith and true American treasure Kelley Stoltz brings us a new collection of instant classics with just a hint more synthery than 2013’s “Double Exposure”. His innate way around a sticky hook and no shortage of tasty studio flourishes will bring out your inner record collector nerd, guaranteed.

Picture yourself in front of your record collection, deciding which one you’ll listen to next. You finally choose Kilimanjaro by Teardrop Explodes; you haven’t listened to it for a long time. In that moment, you notice that your partner placed your Face to Face copy in an incorrect slot. It goes with you to the record player too. A few minutes later, you corroborate that both Cope and Davies made prevailing, lucid and brilliant records. And you dream thinking how would they sound together, in an hypotetic alloy that feels almost impossible straight away. There are only fourteen years away from one record to
the other, but they seem made in different centuries, different planets. We find the answer at the Electric Duck studios in San Francisco, Kelley Stoltz’s base of operations. A Detroit-native, Kelley was an adolescent moved by post-punk and English new-age, and became an adult falling in love with the extensive pop legacy from the 60s.

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Both references define one of the strongest, most talented
discographies of the last years. Filtering and tying those sounds together with freshness and distinction is what makes Kelley an unique composer. Stoltz gets ostentation and histrionics out of the best 80s pop and supplies it with outstanding melodies and sense of humour. What Brian Wilson doing a cover by Wire’s The 15th would feel like.

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Que Aura

When  Kelley Stolz made the jump to Castle Face with his 2015 album, “In Triangle Time” he got weird. Or maybe he already was. Either way, something about the way time and space coincided meant that Stoltz made the loosest, oddest record of his long, mostly buttoned-down career as a pop craftsman. He added synths, played around with structure, and made choices he may not have in the past. For his next album on the label, 2017’s “Que Aura” he took another leap, this time a deeper dive into the sounds of his beloved ’80s. An Echo and the Bunnymen fan to the point where he recorded a version of Crocodiles,  Stoltz actually did join the Bunnymen  as their touring second guitarist.

This gig seems to have unleashed something within Kelley Stoltz, and along with his trademark ’60s-inspired shaggy pop, plus side trips into space rock, warped synth pop, psych, and even some off-kilter disco. Through it all, Stoltz’s way with a hook means that no matter what sounds he dresses the songs in, they are always one sharp hook away from slicing up the speakers. Slick, keyboard-heavy tracks (“Feather Falling”) and insistent synth-driven songs (“Same Pattern”) sound just as good as the jumpy rockers (“I’m Here for Now”) and oddball pop tunes (“Walking Against the Greenlight”), and even the total left turn, the slinky disco number (“Empty Kicks”) ends up sounding really good.

Stoltz has always been a first-rate arranger and producer, but with his last couple records he really seems to have hit his stride. Que Aura is the richest, most diverse, and interesting-sounding album he’s done yet, with the songs to match.

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American singer songwriter residing in San Francisco with comparisions to the Velvet Underground, Brian Wilson, Nick Drake, signed to Jack White’s label Third Man Records,