KELLEY STOLZ – ” Crokodials ” Record Store Day 2020

Posted: June 3, 2020 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Kelley stoltz crcockodials cover %28002%29

Cover versions are not a new idea. Every band and their groupie have done one. Some are good Kelley Stoltz’s track for track covers album of Echo and the Bunnymen’s ‘Crocodiles’ will be available for the first time on vinyl this Record Store Day courtesey of Nine x Nixe Records.

Originally recorded in late 2001, the album was not released until 2006 and was only available on CD (Orignally a TOUR ONLY CD via Beautiful Happiness).

Crockodials is a re-envisaging of renowned Liverpool band Echo and The Bunnymen‘s 1980s album Crocodiles. Now, recording another musician’s entire album is a tad quirky. But for someone who has The Cones Project (a series of traffic cone photos) on his website, it’s not that far out. In fact, Stoltz is quite a unique guy, he plays every instrument on Crock-O-Dials (as he did on previous album Antique Glow in 2004) and personally recorded each song on 8-track, DIY fashion.

When listening to Crockodials, one question begs an answer: why Echo and The Bunnymen? Simple – the Bunnymen are one of Stoltz’s biggest influences. So what better way to pay homage? (There’s even a bunny on the album sleeve…) Crockodials opens with Going Up, an electronic drumbeat starting the song. Apt really, considering that before the Bunnymen employed the late Pete de Freitas as drummer, Echo was their drum machine.

The beautifully melancholic and haunting song Stars Are Stars is slower than the original, somehow giving its lyrics more meaning, such as: “All your dreams are hanging out to dry/Stars are stars and they shine so cold”. It also has a twangy guitar lick which adds new life to this twenty-year old song.

All That Jazz  starts off very chilled with acoustic guitars and Stoltz singing in his Bowie-esque voice, very different from the sound of the Bunnymen. It’s true to state that every song on Crockodials seems fresher, with additional eclectic sounds (such as a xylophone in Pride, and crazily fast tambourine playing in Crocodiles). Crockodials maybe a novelty, one that may pave the way for future album covers. (Perhaps even coaxing Ryan Adams to release his other cover version album of The Strokes‘ Is This It? .

Stoltz took up the mantle of rhythm guitar in the Bunnymen’s live set up in 2016, after a few high profile state-side support slots won largely because of this album. Pressed on 180g colour vinyl, with original artwork and new sleeve notes from Bunnymen guitarist Will Sergeant and Scott Kannberg (Pavement), there’s never been a better time to discover this gem from Stoltz’s back catalogue.

REMASTERED BY MIKEY YOUNG -Bonus 7″ E.P.features 3 early demos of 14 year old Kelley’s band.These are the earliest known recordings of Stoltz’s Bunnymen covers.This E.P.is exclusive to the RSD release and will not be available with any subsequent reissue.

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