Posts Tagged ‘Joe Strummer’

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4CD digipack set that includes shows from the Palladium New York, 21st Sepetember 1979, the Capitol Theatre, Passaic NJ, 8th March 1980, the Nakano Sun Plaza, 28th January 1982, and the US Festival San Bernadino, 28th May 1983. One of the greatest live bands ever at the peak of their powers. These are live broadcasts from the time so quality is variable.

Disc 1-New York, 1979 Safe European Home I’m So Bored With The U.S.A. Complete Control London Calling (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais Koka Kola I Fought The Law Jail Guitar Doors The Guns Of Brixton English Civil War Clash City Rockers Stay Free Clampdown Police And Thieves Capital Radio Tommy Gun Wrong ‘Em Boyo Janie Jones Garageland Armagideon Time Career Opportunities What’s My Name White Riot

Arguably among the most famous concert in the history of The Clash; the night of the ‘ultimate rock photo’ and cover of London Calling and the source of probably the most widely circulated Clash bootleg from the FM radio broadcast. Critical acclaim following the gig was also significant in pushing further the band’s profile in the US.
WNEW FM recorded the complete concert and this high quality stereo broadcast is the source of all the recordings in circulation. This was the second of the two concerts at the seated and sold out Palladium on New York’s 14th Street.

The 3,800 seater Palladium was an old converted theatre, as ornate as London’s Lyceum but sleazier with drug pushers plying their trade outside.

Disc 2-Passaic NJ, 1980 Clash City Rockers Brand New Cadillac Safe European Home Jimmy Jazz London Calling Guns Of Brixton Train In Vain White Man Koka Kola/I Fought The Law Spanish Bombs Police and Thieves Stay Free Julie’s Been Working For The Drug Squad Wrong ‘Em Boyo Janie Jones Complete Control Armagideon Time English Civil War Garageland Bank Robber Tommy Gun

Disc 3-Tokyo, 1982 London Calling Safe European Home (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais Brand New Cadillac Charlie Don’t Surf Clampdown This is Radio Clash Armagideon Time Jimmy Jazz Tommy Gun Fujiyama Mama (w/ Pearl Harbour) Police On My Back White Riot

Disc 4-San Bernadino, 1983 Somebody Got Murdered Rock The Casbah Guns Of Brixton Know Your Rights Koka Kola Hate & War Armagideon Time The Sound Of Sinners Safe European Home Police On My Back Brand New Cadillac I Fought The Law I’m So Bored With The U.S.A. Train In Vain The Magnificent Seven Straight To Hell Should I Stay Or Should I Go Clampdown

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Bored With The USA

The final concert the Clash played with Mick Jones, and just after Combat Rock had made them into platinum selling world stars. Recorded on 28th May, 1983 at San Bernadino’s US Festival. Tracks include Rock The Casbah, Magnificent 7, I’m So Bored With The USA (you gotta love them!), and plenty more.

The Clash came to a rather sad ending in May 1983. The group had every reason to be on the top of the world by this point: their previous LP, Combat Rock, was an enormous hit and their singles “Rock the Casbah” and “Should I Stay or Should I Go” were all over radio and MTV. But drummer Topper Headon was kicked out of the group for drug abuse in 1982, and Mick Jones and Joe Strummer were barely speaking.

They took a six-month break after the Combat Rock tour ended in November 1982, but a $500,000 offer from Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak to headline New Wave Day of the US Festival proved impossible to turn down. To warm up for the huge festival, the group went on a four-date tour of Texas and Arizona. Founding drummer Terry Chimes (who rejoined the band in 1982 after Headon got the boot) was once again out of the group by this point, so they took out an ad in Melody Maker and recruited 23-year-old Pete Howard.

By the time they got to San Bernardino, California for the festival, they were in complete disarray. Things got worse when they learned fans were paying $25 to attend the show. They had been told previously that prices would be set at $17, and shortly before they went onstage, they held a press conference. The band announced they wouldn’t go on unless Apple gave $100,000 to charity. It was chaos. Some later claimed the real cause of their rage was the knowledge that Van Halen were getting a million dollars for their set.

The band eventually went onstage two hours late and played a sloppy, 80-minute set in front of a banner that read “The Clash Not for Sale.” Joe Strummer taunted the audience from the stage and afterward, the band got into a brawl with security. The group still walked away with a half-million dollars; four months later, they announced that Mick Jones was leaving the group. The chaotic US Festival was his final appearance with the band.

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Guns From Brixton

Legendary cable broadcast recorded at the Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ on March 8th 1980, and featuring the classic line up of Strummer, Jones, Simonon, Headon. Tracks include London Calling, Guns of Brixton, Police and Thieves, Complete Control etc.

We can be very grateful that this very enjoyable Clash 16 Tons performance is unusually well documented by not only a good audience recording, but an excellent soundboard source too and even complete black and white video recording of the whole show.

This documentary evidence reveals a typically of this tour, super-tight and professional show. Although, inspired in places it does not really catch fire until Clampdown through to the encores. The Clash tired no doubt after their high profile Palladium show the night before (TV crews, New York press and glitterati) needed the feedback of energy from the audience, but that was not going to happen from this all seated venue. The result as can be seen from the video is that The Clash this night are largely on auto-pilot and real inspiration is only there on certain songs.

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The Only Band That Matters

Compilation of live broadcast tracks dating from 1977 to 1983. Tracks include all the favourites – White Man, Tommy Gun, Train In Vain, Should I Stay and more.

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Radio Clash From Tokyo

Legendary live broadcast from Nakano Sun Plaza, Tokyo recorded on 28th January 1982, and around the time of the release of Sandinista. Tracks include London Calling, White Man, Brand New Cadillac, Armagideon Time, White Riot etc.

The Clash were burning down the Nakano Sun Plaza in Tokyo as part of their Far East tour in early 1982, playing some pre-release versions of songs that would eventually appear on “Combat Rock” three months later. In terms of quality, this set is hit and miss . . . But even in its muddied glory, you can still hear the power and musicianship of the band shining through. You can even sense some remaining rapport between the band members here – probably the last of it, as the band was touring in the midst of the contentious recording of that album. Mick Jones was unhappy with the rest of the band rejecting his Rat Patrol From Fort Bragg mix, and Glyn Johns was about to be brought in at the end of the tour to remix the album in London. Jones was especially pissed at Joe Strummer; their acrimony would lead to Jones leaving the group less than eighteen months later .

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White Riots In New York: Broadcast Live From The Palladium, NYC, 1979

The classic line up of The Clash lasted for five years from 1977 to 1982 and featured lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Joe Strummer, lead guitarist and vocalist Mick Jones, bassist Paul Simonon and drummer Nicky “Topper” HeadonGive ‘Em Enough Rope, the second studio album, was released on 10th November 1978. The album was a huge success and by 1979 The Clash had begun to make serious inroads into the US market.

White Riots in New York City is the legendary Clash broadcast from The Palladium NYC on 21st September 1979. This powerful recording captures The Clash at the peak of their form performing material from Give ‘Em Enough Rope and The Clash and their soon to be released third album, London Calling.

Featuring cover illustrations by Ray Lowry, the official Clash “War Artist”, who toured with The Clash and sketched them on stage and in rehearsal.

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In 1977, The Clash dropped their hugely influential self-titled debut album on CBS Records, and it still stands up as one of punk’s most essential releases. With their speedy and reckless yet musically adept political punk rock, The Clash arguably became the most influential punk band of their era. On their debut LP, frontman Joe Strummer took on uncomfortable topics like class warfare and imperialism, and their gritty songs exuded a frantic rage and the spirit of alienated youth.

On March 8th, 1980, The Clash performed at the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, N.J. following the release of London Calling a few months prior . That night, the band performed amongst others three cuts from their debut record”Janie Jones,” “Police and Thieves” and “Garageland.” Something strange happened at this show there was a bomb-scare that resulted in a delay while police checked underneath the seats to confirm there was not a problem [Joe adlibs about the bomb scare in Police & Thieves]. The supporting acts included the B-Girls, Mikey Dread and Lee Dorsey. The B-Girls were an all girl new wave band. “In Passaic New Jersey they had an in house video set up. Result: Paul and Topper pointed the onstage camera onto the audience who were arriving and finding their seats. Topper beats out the intro to Janie Jones then a single spot picks out Joe then all the lights come on as the song kicks in and Joe throws his guitar behind him, without looking, presumably Johnny waiting! Joe grabs the mic shouting out the lyrics with Mick and Paul running around the stage, switching sides. It’s electric visually (and aurally) and the highlight certainly of the video.

The Clash performed a rumbling, slightly sped-up rendition of “Janie Jones,” their cover of Junior Murvin’s reggae classic “Police and Thieves” and a mashup of “Garageland” with “English Civil War” from their 1978 album Give ‘Em Enough Rope. “This particular show has been widely circulated in various formats over the last 20+ years… but there’s a damn good reason for that! This show just plain ROCKS!”

This is a superlative example of the Clash’s ‘16 Tons’ tour. The band is at a peak here, even with a hobbled Topper Headon. Mickey Gallagher’s organ playing added a lot of dimension to the band’s sound, especially on the London Calling numbers, and the band is tight and together. Mick’s guitar sound is particularly impressive here.

Joe addresses the audience throughout the gig! The opening chords of Clash City Rockers then ring out. Joe intense; belts out the words and his Telecaster as Mick handkerchief hanging out of his shirt pocket (sartorially influenced no doubt by one Ian Dury, who gave Mick one of his trademark jackets – Ian was guest vocalist on Janie Jones the two previous nights when the Clash played the Palladium Mick gives his best detached guitar hero impression. He spends a lot of time throughout with his back to audience adjusting his guitar effects,

The Clash perform “Janie Jones,” “Police and Thieves” and “Garageland” “Wrong Em Boyo” 8th March Capitol Theatre Passiac New Jersey live in 1980, Plus Blockhead Mick Gallagher on keyboards.  dub legend Mikey Dread and two encores.

Full setlist:

Clash City Rockers- Brand New Cadillac – Safe European Home – Jimmy Jazz  – London Calling- Guns of Brixton  – Train In Vain  – White Man – Koka Kola / I Fought The Law  – Spanish Bombs  – Police And Thieves  – Stay Free – Julie’s Been Working For The Drug Squad- Wrong Em Boyo  – Clampdown (incomplete)  – Janie Jones  – Complete Control – Armageddon Time  – English Civil War / Garageland  – Bank Robber – Tommy Gun

joe-strummer

If Joe Strummer had never done anything outside of the Clash, that would’ve been enough. That band, they’re one of the absolute Greats, one of those groups that is so iconic and influential that Strummer’s legend in rock history was easily solidified by that alone. But though his releases were more sporadic after the Clash fell apart, he still recorded a lot of other great music before his untimely death in 2002. He is getting an everything-and-the-kitchen-sink treatment for the many reels of unreleased tape he had archived in his barn.

In 2013, The Clash Sound System box set compiled everything of that band’s varied and sundry discography, with the standard live sets, first-, out- and mis-takes, in a package designed like a boom box. A new book, available in the box set and deluxe editions, is filled with “rarely seen and previously unpublished memorabilia from Joe’s personal collection as well as historical press reviews and technical notes about the albums,” according to a news release.

Joe Strummer 001 looks to be a more modest affair than that package in every way except the actual music it contains, covering the complete cross-section of Strummer’s solo musical development, inextricable as it is from his work with The Clash; the dead-standard early bar band material, his late-’80s hip-hop-influenced four-on-the-floor slams, bonfire-and-whiskey folk globe-trotters and the weed-smokey collage-pop of The Mescaleros, stretching back to 1975. Among the gems inside are rare soundtrack songs (including an outtake of “Crying on 23rd,” from Sid & Nancy), collaborations with artists like Johnny Cash and a particularly rare unreleased cassette demo from the mid-’70s called “Letsagetabitarockin.”

An incomplete list of the various projects included here should make it clear: The 101ers, The Astro-Physicians, Radar, Electric Dog House, The Soothsayers, Pearl Harbour, Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros, collaborations with Jimmy Cliff and Johnny Cash and post-Clash work with Mick Jones and Paul Simonon.

Below, find a sample single from it, titled “London Is Burning” — a song that was reworked into the (better) Mescaleros‘ song “Burning Streets (London Is Burning).” “London Is Burning,” recorded with the Mescaleros, was later issued as “Burning Streets” on Streetcore, a 2003 posthumous release. The cassette edition of Joe Strummer 001 is where you’ll find the “U.S. North Basement Demo,” recorded by Strummer and Jones in 1986.

Joe Strummer 001 will be released September. 28th on Ignition Records.

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This day in 1979, I walked home from Virgin Records exactly 38 years ago today with a plastic bag containing the double album by The Clash. It was priced as a single LP but had two vinyl records tucked inside. The inner sleeves had “hand written” lyrics and it has to be the lyrics I’ve read most often. Both historically and personally  The Clash, London Calling had a huge profound impact.

The Punk-Rock legends’ third album was released in 1979 by CBS Records. Like so many great albums included on the Best Of’s lists: genres switch and there is an ambitious mix of sounds and musical ideas. London Calling addresses social displacement, unemployment and racial conflict – drug use and responsibility was also touched upon. From Lover’s Rock’s messages of safe sex to the anthemic rally of the title track; it is an album that has defined the decade and continues to influence bands. It has sold over five-million copies and is thought of as one of the defining records of the Punk era. London Calling captured The Clash’s energy and primal urges; their loud and vital voice and social consciousness. If previous albums (from the band) focused on British sounds and ideas: London Calling incorporated more American sounds and suggestions. Rebellious, romantic and exhilarating: a true one-of-a-kind treasure from one of Britain’s greatest bands of all time.

It was released in the United Kingdom on 14th December 1979 through CBS Records, and in the United States in January 1980 through Epic Records. The album represented a change in The Clash’s musical style, featuring elements of ska, funk, pop, soul, jazz, rockabilly, and reggae more prominently than in their previous two albums.

London Calling was widely regarded as one of the greatest albums of all time. In 1987, it was ranked on Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Best Albums of the Last Twenty Years”. In 1993, NME ranked the album at number six on its list of The Greatest Albums of the ’70s. Vibe magazine included the double album on its list of the 100 Essential Albums of the 20th Century. Q magazine ranked London Calling at number four on its 1999 list of the 100 Greatest British Albums, and, in 2002, included the album in its list of the 100 Best Punk Albums

This fantastic catchy song was not listed on the cover of the original album so it was my first experience with so called bonus tracks that is so common these days. The Lyrics was however printed on the inner sleeve.

This album has been in my top ten since it was released, it is a classic rock’n roll album that everyone should own. I do not concider it a punk rock album musically but the attitude that reeks off this album is quintessential punk. The styles and genres are excitingly mixed and woven together, but laid on top of  a punk rock foundation.

Depending on the source, the working title for what would become London Calling was either The New Testament or The Last Testament. The story works better if you believe Kosmo Vinyl’s argument for The Last Testamentthat The Clash intended London Calling to be the last rock ‘n’ roll album, the paired bookend to Elvis’ first album, right down to the pink-and-green lettering.

Since The Clash continued to make rock music after London Calling, it’s silly to take the “last rock ‘n’ roll album” assertion literally or as evidence of a collective ego gone mad. I think it’s more accurate to say that The Clash approached London Calling from the perspective of “What if this were the last rock ‘n’ roll record—what would that sound like, feel like, be like?” Given their concern about impending world doom expressed so clearly in the title track, they may well have felt on a subconscious level that London Calling could very well be the last rock ‘n’ roll record.

I can’t think of any other album that triggers as many different emotions, ignites so much passion and authenticates so many deeply held personal values. A work of tremendous energy, London Calling is also extraordinarily energizing. At the end of the record you may not be any clearer than Joe Strummer was about what we can do to change this fucked-up world of ours, but you leave with more confidence that somehow we’ll figure it out. More than any other record in my collection, London Calling can pick me up when I’m down, and give me hope whenever I feel all is hopeless.

On January. 1st, 1977, Joe Strummer took center stage at London’s burgeoning punk rock refuge, the Roxy. As if presciently ordaining himself the harbinger of what was in store for the pivotal year, “1977” was scrawled boldly across the frontman’s tattered white collared shirt as he and his fellow band members The Clash stormed through two back-to-back sets, officiating both the launch of the Roxy as a cultural touchstone and the explosion of the U.K. punk movement as a whole. The Roxy was a fashionable nightclub located at 41-43 Neal Street in London Covent Garden known for hosting the flowering British Punk Music scene in its infancy. The premises had formerly been used as a warehouse to serve the Covent Garden wholesale fruit and vegetable market.

After an unsuccessful run as an “alternative” nightclub called Chaguaramas, situated in the Covent Garden neighborhood of London, Andrew Czezowski, who was then manager of the Damned and the bands ChelseaGeneration X, took ownership of the building. Initially intended as a place for his client acts to rehearse, he along with partners Barry Jones and Susan Carrington pawned a number of their personal possessions, furnished the venue, and stocked the bar, reviving the haunt as the Roxy, hoping to do for London’s punk scene what CBGB did for New York. By the time the club opened Chelsea had split with members Idol and James and Towe forming Generation X and it was they who played on closely followed by the Heartbreakers fresh off the aborted Anarchy Tour.

Don Letts was the resident DJ at the club and he was instrumental in encouraging punk rockers to embrace reggae.

The music scene within which the Clash had been slowly ingratiating themselves had begun years before the fabled New Year’s gig, but it had been trammeled by censorship, and poor luck. 1976’s Anarchy Tour, wherein the band, accompanied by Johnny Thunders’ Heartbreakers, supported the Sex Pistols on a string of ill-fated dates, the majority of booked appearances had been canceled due the pressure of local political interests or the volume of protest demonstrators. By the time the tour had dissolved in scandal on Christmas Eve, as retold in Nick Crossley’s Networks of Sound, Style and Subversion: The Punk and Post-Punk Worlds of Manchester, London, Liverpool and Sheffield, 1975-80, almost two-thirds of the 20-odd scheduled dates were cancelled before a note had been played.

The ill-repute earned by the failed Anarchy Tour mostly plagued the Sex Pistols, however, as they headlined the bill while the Clash occupied the most modest slot, below that of the Heartbreakers. With hardly a reputation visible enough to damage, they were best positioned to recover. Sex Pistols documentarian Julian Temple, whose forgotten footage of the Roxy evening was finally unearthed for the 2015 BBC Four documentary, The Clash: New Year’s Day ’77, told the network at the time of the release, “The Clash weren’t known at all outside a very small circle, but I thought they were an incredible band in the making.”

Armed with a sharpened assortment of politically militant punk anthems-in-waiting, most of which would eventually appear on their eponymous debut three months following the Roxy gala, Temple recorded subterranean Clash rehearsals, capturing now-familiar numbers in their embryonic form. Where the Sex Pistols expressed their subversive proclivities with sneering confrontation and a manic public image (and in a sense, establishing the “punker” archetype), the Clash honed more melodic and informed song structures and envisaged a more focused and clear-cut ideological vision.

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But it wasn’t the Clash’s brand of more organized and presentable subversion that was originally slated to break in the newly rebranded Roxy. As Marcus Gray put it, in his book The Clash: Return of the Last Gang in Town, “The Clash agreed to headline the 1st January 1977 Roxy opening night, thus beginning the new year with a highly symbolic act.

It was the Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren, in his characteristically mercurial fashion, who pulled his clients out of the gig at the last minute as a result of the fallout following the Pistols infamous TV appearance on the Today show. Still, the symbolism of the turn of events is not exaggerated. The memorably turbulent, not to mention capacity-defying, performance was the first of a series of overtures that would propel the Clash past the perpetually embattled Sex Pistols as the U.K. punk rock hierarchy.

 

The Roxy’s reign, on the other hand, would be tragically short-lived: it shuttered its doors in April 1978, little over a year after its grand opening. But not before cementing its legacy by cycling through the gambit of prominent English punk acts of the era, from street-punk squatters like Crass and Slaughter and the Dogs to art-school post-punks Wire and Siouxsie and the Banshees . Despite the brevity of the Roxy’s run, the bands it hosted and movement it helped launch proved bigger and more lastingly influential than the Clash and their contemporaries could have ever predicted.

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The Roxy Club London WC2

The Clash’s first album came out in 1977, the same year the Sex Pistols historic album “Never Mind The Bollocks”  debuted — though the Clash self-titled LP was delayed two years in the U.S., where it was given a revised track listing and a release after their second album came out in the States.

It was an exciting time for rock ‘n’ roll. The politically potent and emotionally charged songs on The Clash represented a new era. “No Elvis Beatles or the Rolling Stones” as one of their songs memorably declared.

On this day (April. 8th) in 1977: The Clash released their debut, self-titled LP on CBS Records in the UK (& a thousand new punk bands were born!); it reached number 12 on the UK albums chart, but would not be released in the US until 1979 (with a modified track listing); the album’s front cover photo, shot by Kate Simon, was taken in the alleyway directly opposite the front door of the band’s ‘Rehearsal Rehearsals’ building in Camden Market; drummer Terry Chimes did not appear in the picture as he had already decided to leave the group – he was credited as ‘Tory Crimes’ on the sleeve…Recorded between three weekend sessions 10th-27th February at the CBS studios 3 in London and the National Film School studios in Beaconsfield, By the third of these sessions the album was recorded and mixed to completion, with the tapes being delivered to CBS at the start of March. It cost £4000 to produce.

The subject of the opening track, Janie Jones, was a famous brothel owner in London during the 1970s. Remote Control was written by Mick Jones  after the Anarchy Tour and contains pointed observations about the civic hall bureaucrats who had cancelled concerts, the police, big business and especially record companies. CBS decided to release the song as a single without consulting the band. I’m So Bored with the USA, developed from a Mick Jones song, entitled “I’m So Bored with You”, condemns the Americanization of the UK. White Riot was The Clash debut single. The song is short and intense, punk style of two chords played very fast (5 chords in total song). Lyrically, it is about class economics and race. Career Opportunities, the opening track of the second side of the album, attacks the political and economic situation in England at the time, citing the lack of jobs available, and the dreariness and lack of appeal of those that were available.

“Protex Blue”, sung by Mick Jones, is about a 1970s brand of condom. It was inspired by the contraceptive vending machine found in Windsor Castle toilets. The song ends with the shouted phrase “Johnny Johnny!”, “johnny” being a British slang term for a condom.

 

The version of “White Riot” featured on here was not recorded for the album. Instead, they used the original demo version, recorded at Beaconsfield Studios before the band signed to CBS.

Junior Murvin’s Police & Thieves was added to the album when the group realised that the track listing was too short. Another cover the band played at these sessions was Bob Marley’s “Dancing Shoes”. Garageland was written in response to NME writer Charles Shaar Murray’s damning review of a Clash early appearance at the Sex Pistols Screen on the Green concert – “The Clash are the kind of garage band who should be returned to the garage immediately, preferably with the engine running”It was the final track recorded for the album.

Tracklist

Janie Jones
Remote Control
I’m So Bored with the U.S.A.
White Riot
Hate & War
What’s My Name
Deny
London’s Burning
Career Opportunities
Cheat
Protex Blue
Police & Thieves
48 hours
Garageland

Here is an amazing documentary, which tells the story of Joe Strummer, former Clash frontman and defining figure of British popular music.
As a Celebration of his life and his music, with exclusive interviews from band members, close friends, roadies and fans, this film gives an insight into the artist whose sudden death in 2002 came as a shock to the music world.
Interviewees include Mick Jones, Topper Headon, Jonny Green, Glen Matlock, Pennie Smith and more. Also featured is music from Joe Strummer,The Clash and The Mescaleros. You can see footage of performances of Tommy Gun, Graceland, London Calling, White Riot and many many more.

Narrated by Robert Elms

Documentary Chapters:
Chapter 1. First Impression
Chapter 2. Early Days
Chapter 3. Punk… So What Was That All About?
Chapter 4. Leader of the Pack
Chapter 5. The Fans
Chapter 6. We Gotta Move On
Chapter 7. Backlash
Chapter 8. Amerika
Chapter 9. The Man Behind the Mask
Chapter 10. Words and Music
Chapter 11. “I Am Not Che Guevara”
Chapter 12. That Split
Chapter 13. The Wilderness Years
Chapter 14. The Mescaleros
Chapter 15. Joe At 50
Chapter 16. Deja Vu
Chapter 17. Joe R.I.P
Chapter 18. Legacy
Chapter 19. Strummerville
Chapter 20. Memories

 

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After two albums of increasing ambition (the two-LP ‘London Calling‘ was followed by the triple ‘Sandinista!’), and a two-year recording break, the Clash’s classic lineup returned with their final album, a lean, song-centered effort. ‘Combat Rock’ which made them MTV stars, thanks to the hit singles “Rock the Casbah” and “Should I Stay or Should I Go.” But the album goes deeper than that, finding inspiration in some new corners, despite the increasing tensions among band members during recording. This was the last hurrah for guitarist Mick Jones and drummer Topper Headon … and the Clash. 

It was the fifth studio album from the Clash and the penultimate album, Released on CBS records in May 1972 and spent 61 weeks in the charts, recorded at Ear Studios in London between September 1971 and january 1972 and Electric Lady studios in New York, originally planned as a double album with a working title of “Rat Patrol from Fort Bragg” with mixing done by Mick Jones the band were dissatisfied with the result and internal wrangling within the band bought in Glyn Johns and reduced the running order to a single album major tracks were Should I Stay , Should I Go, Straight To Hell and Rock the Casbah, during promotion for the album Joe Strummer sported a Travis Bickle Mohican haircut.

The Band were Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Topper Headon and Paul Simonon,