Posts Tagged ‘Jana Bahrich’

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On her latest project as Francis of Delirium Jana Bahrich attempts to piece together a sense of self-understanding while traversing a collision of reds and blues, various deep waterways, and oscillating ridges of guitar distortion. Like a rabid cartographer, the Luxembourg-based musician realizes that mapping our own humanity is messy and inordinately confusing. Her reflections result is the visceral, affecting EP “Wading”.

Wading joins Bahrich’s dynamic vocals—ranging from rare moments of fragile falsetto to volcanic yells—and spacious grunge-inspired compositions. There are bits of soaring guitars on the opening track “Lakes” that recall Explosions in the Sky, while grit-fuelled moments conjure the experiments of noisy forebears like Car Seat Headrest or Fontaines D.C. Bahrich’s post-punk/grunge/noise mixture is buttressed to fruition with producer/drummer Chris Hewett; especially poignant is the dramatic closer “I Think I’m Losing,” when Hewett collapses into the chorus. 

After last year’s All Change EP, her sophomore follow-up is an impressive continuation of Bahrich’s catalogue. “Wading” is an intimate snapshot of an upcoming artist figuring out how individuality manifests (and how it isn’t really individual at all); what happens when those closest to us leave? Are we still the same? How does one choose to make sense of life’s lessons? Are they meant to be metaphorical or literal? These are only a few of the questions Francis of Delirium pokes at amidst the riotously fun, melodically grounded instrumentation.

1. “Lakes”

“Lakes” sets up the rest of the EP by speaking about identity and a sense of self that eventually starts to erode until that idea of self is gone and changed. The main idea in “Lakes” is that we are all fed by other people (or other “rivers”) to eventually form who we are: one large lake fed by other water streams. We are essentially the amalgamation of hundreds of people rather than one singular person. A lot of my self identity was tied to the people in my community at school, so once those relationships shifted as I left school my identity was challenged. That anchor was no longer there, that structure was gone. The question I sort of pose throughout the EP is, who am I now as these relationships morph?

2. “Red”

“Red” is the pushing away of someone and justifying it with your anger rather than rationally discussing your feelings. It’s believing something you thought to be true and then that being switched. It’s the loss of trust in a relationship. You’re left angry and confused, unsure of yourself, or who to trust. Instead of communicating effectively, you start to push away, preemptively moving into isolation as a defense mechanism to stop yourself from more hurt. Simultaneously the song challenges the goodness I see in myself, as a good friend, someone filled with love is gone, which distances you from this idea of yourself even further. So you’re pushing away someone else and pushing away a version of yourself you enjoy.

3. “Let It All Go”

It’s set over one night at a party, and eventually resulting in the acceptance and letting go of a relationship that is broken. The song is very confessional so it’s written in this stream of consciousness, almost in a spoken word kind of way. “Let It All Go” chronicles a full commitment to isolation. To me the song feels like this vertigo, justifying and grappling and releasing. Trying to take back your anger from before, that how someone hurt you doesn’t matter and you can move past it: “I’m so sorry I was overbearing and I’m so sorry I thought this meant something.” Eventually there’s this acceptance, you have to let go. Although removing yourself is the healthier option, you also descend into a space of isolation.

4. “I Think I’m Losing”

It’s a reflection on everything that transpired in the previous songs, filled with self-doubt and uncertainty. A lot of the EP is pointing rage inwardly and this song reaches the peak of that. An entire question of the self, am I losing who I am? Was I good to the people who love me? Was everything that happened fabricated and blown out of proportion? Are my feelings valid? Was it all my fault pushing people away? Just a real good old spiral into uncertainty, imbalance, and emptiness. At the end of the day, though, maybe you should be feeling this, maybe you need to feel like you’re losing to motivate yourself to rebuild stronger and with more love and less anger at yourself and everywhere else.

As the EP progresses my perspective continues to distort. It felt interesting to take emotions that are rooted in truth and then pushing them to the extreme and exploring that heightened feeling.

Francis of Delirium deliver powerful homegrown indie rock on “Red.” The track comes ahead of their forthcoming EP “Wading” and follows the track “Let It All Go.” The Luxembourg-based duo offer choppy, repetitive verses against a fuzzy guitar, giving the band their signature grunge-infused indie sound. In the chorus, singer Jana Bahrich repeats, “It all turned red when it all made sense / and it all turned red,” which she explained in a statement as lyrically describing “the pushing away of someone and justifying it with your anger rather than rationally discussing your feelings. It’s believing something you thought to be true and then that being switched. It’s the loss of trust in a relationship.” The song arrived with an animated music video, created by Bahrich. 

Today the band are back with another new song from it, “Red,” which features the same sort of hypnotic repetition and surging urgency.

Red is the pushing away of someone and justifying it with your anger rather than rationally discussing your feelings. It’s believing something you thought to be true and then that being switched. It’s the loss of trust in a relationship,” the band’s Jana Bahrich said in a statement, continuing:

You’re left angry and confused, unsure of yourself, or who to trust. Instead of communicating effectively, you start to push away, preemptively moving into isolation as a defence mechanism to stop yourself from more hurt. Simultaneously the song challenges the goodness I see in myself, as a good friend, someone filled with love is gone, which distances you from this idea of yourself even further. So you’re pushing away someone else and pushing away a version of yourself you enjoy.

Most of this footage was taken by my grandfather around the 70s and part of the footage is of me as a child, me at the age I am now. Lakes explores identity and feelings of being lost. We are all bodies that feed into each other to make our own individual lakes. I found a great deal of identity through community and through isolation that sense of self was lost. Through the music video I wanted to find identity through family and heritage. I never really developed a relationship with my grandfather and I found a large sense of self through making the video. Many tears were shed.

Wading follows the band’s previous EP, 2020’s All Change. The band consists of 19-year-old singer/songwriter Jana Bahrich (from Vancouver, British Columbia) and drummer/producer Chris Hewett (from Seattle, Wash.), who’s several decades her senior.

Due on 9th April on Dalliance Recordings

Francis of Delirium is the combination of 19-year-old Jana Bahrich and Chris Hewett, who hail from Vancouver, CA and Seattle respectively, but now are based in Luxembourg where they currently reside and make music. They’re preparing the release of their new EP “Wading” via Dalliance Recordings and have recently let go of it’s passionate lead single “Let It All Go.”

Part pummeling garage rock and art-rock anthem with some Art Brut-esque delivery, it blossoms into something else with the vocals converging into an acapella-like moment before diving into a 90s garage rock finish. You can feel the emotion pouring out of Bahrich at every moment in a convincing raw fashion.

Throughout 2020 Luxembourg-based, Canadian-American two-piece Francis of Delirium gave us plenty of musical reasons to get excited about them and their powerful Equality Song also made it into our list of the favourite tracks of the year. Despite her young age charismatic songwriter Jana Bahrich writes very mindful and musically profound tracks that shouldn’t shy away from some true classics of indie rock history. There’s this special lo-fi vibe that makes these songs as timeless as they are fresh. A first EP was released last year, a follow-up called “Wading” is set for a release on February 12th. We also asked Bahrich about her personal thoughts and hopes for the upcoming year and here’s what she had to say:

“You can expect my favourite music we’ve made to be out in the world next year, my favourite video I’ve made so far to be out and for us to be doing everything we can to be putting on our best shows yet. My hope is for the world to get to a point where it is safe enough for artists to play to a packed audience/for us to play to a packed audience so that I would be able to stage dive and not fall straight to the ground, that would be pretty cool. That’s my lofty goal for next year, a stage dive.”

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Francis Of Delirium are a duo out of Luxembourg matching Jana Bahrich, a 19-year-old Vancouver native, with the significantly older drummer and producer Chris Hewett, who hails from Seattle. They’re dropping their new EP “Wading” in April on Dalliance Recordings, which has released music from the likes of Gia Margaret and Common Holly. It’s preceded today by “Let It All Go,” a talky and anthemic multi-segmented track that climaxes with Bahrich repeatedly yelling, “Aren’t you tired of being alone?!”

Francis Of Delirium is the product of an unlikely collaboration: Vocalist Jana Bahrich is a 19-year-old from Vancouver, drummer Chris Hewett is almost 30 years older and from Seattle, but the two met and teamed up in Luxembourg, of all places. Together, they’ve made spiky, grunge-inflected indie rock on Wading, a sophomore EP released this past spring. But the band is already changing, still in the early stages of crafting their sound: More recent singles “Come Out And Play” and “All Love” leaned in a more atmospheric, shoegaze-oriented direction, and they were the best songs Francis have released yet.

With an accompanying claymation-filled music video. “Let It All Go” unfurls with an energy on the brink of self-detonation. It’s a steamy, cathartic breakup song drawing on classic indie rock and emo, marked by Bahrich’s exasperated spoken vocals and climaxing with violently euphoric yelps of “Aren’t you tired of being alone?” Instead of shying away from the ugliness of relationships, it displays it shamelessly, while also lending self-forgiveness. Bahrich says the new single “feels like this vertigo, justifying and grappling and releasing.

An incredible mix of 90s grunge and millennial DIY from a duo we can comfortably call our favourite two-piece from Luxembourg. “All Change” is the debut EP by the Luxembourg-based, Canadian-American duo Francis Of Delirium, a band fast on the rise. First appearing back in January with the instantaneous track ‘Quit Fucking Around’, Francis Of Delirium have caught attention by making a powerful sound where 90’s grunge collides with indie folk and millennial DIY; different generations of rock explained in part by 18 year-old songwriter Jana Bahrich being thirty years junior to her collaborator Chris Hewett. 

A highly creative and self-contained duo, intimacy and vulnerability lies at the heart of their music, made impactful by Jana’s high energy vocals and genuine passion to connect with each member of the audience. All Change perfectly illustrates this, a five-track primer that not only delivers on their early promise but shows they’re just getting started.

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Limited Edition Black Vinyl LP + signed drawing [by FoD’s Jana Bahrich – exclusive edition of 250 First time on vinyl, 

 

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Francis Of Delirium are a somewhat surprising duo, consisting of 18-year-old singer and songwriter Jana Bahrich and collaborator Chris Hewett, some 30 years her senior. The pair didn’t even share a country, splitting themselves between Canada and the US, before settling in their current home of Luxembourg. What they do share is a love of 90’s grunge, the influence of bands like Alice In Chains or Soundgarden colliding with millennial bedroom pop to make something compelling and intriguing. The band are set to release their debut album, “All Change”, next month, and have this week shared a new single, “Ashamed”.

Discussing the track, Jana has suggested it touches on ideas of, “navigating how much of yourself you should be giving out to other people”, and often feeling inadequate for not sharing more of yourself with the world. Musically, as you’d perhaps expect from the themes, Ashamed is a tightly wound-affair, Jana’s rapid tumble of vocals colliding with crunchy guitar lines, in a tense unravelling of emotion. You can almost hear the ideas cycling through Jana’s head, shaping into rapidly formed thoughts before quickly dancing off somewhere else, the music mirroring the whirring of a sleepless mind. A fascinating collision of ideas,

Francis Of Delirium feels like an intoxicating blend, there’s a restlessness and an urgency here, a demand to be heard that we can only recommend you give into, it’s well worthy of your time.

Band Members
Jana Bahrich,
Chris Hewett,
Jeff Hennico,

“All Change” is out June 19th via Dalliance Records.