Posts Tagged ‘Ivy Trip’

Waxahatchee - <em>Ivy Tripp</em> (Merge)

Home-recorded DIY punk rock does not have to sound like aural dogshit. Case in point: Katie Crutchfield and a couple of friends rented a house in Long Island, played around with the acoustics in different rooms, and knocked out a handful of songs about longing and frustration. They walked away with a huge, gleaming song-cycle, a towering heap of melodies and feelings. And if they can make something they did on their own sound this amazing,

Waxahatchee, the solo musical project of Katie Crutchfield, is named after a creek not far from her childhood home in Alabama and seems to represent both where she came from and where she’s going. Ivy Tripp drifts confidently from its predecessors and brings forth a more informed and powerful recognition of where Crutchfield has currently found herself. The lament and grieving for her youth seem to have been replaced with control and sheer self-honesty. “My life has changed a lot in the last two years, and it’s been hard for me to process my feelings other than by writing songs,” says Crutchfield. “I think a running theme [of Ivy Tripp] is steadying yourself on shaky ground and reminding yourself that you have control in situations that seem overwhelming, or just being cognizant in moments of deep confusion or sadness, and learning to really feel emotions and to grow from that.”

Over the years, Katie Crutchfield has proven herself a master of the form: ’90s-inflected, nasally, home-recorded punk. Ivy Tripp is yet another subtle but meaningful step forward from what she’s been doing in various iterations for a decade now. It’s the perfect fall record: the crunch of leaves, the crisp morning air can be felt in every note. It’s the sound of stumbling and brushing the dirt off, feeling like shit, not knowing where to go or what to do next. It’s a record for wanderers, for those of us who are unable to or refuse to settle down

Recorded and engineered by Kyle Gilbride of Wherever Audio at Crutchfield’s home on New York’s Long Island—with drums recorded in the gym of a local elementary school—Ivy Tripp presents a more developed and aged version of Waxahatchee. “The title Ivy Tripp is really just a term I made up for directionless-ness, specifically of the 20-something, 30-something, 40-something of today, lacking regard for the complaisant life path of our parents and grandparents. I have thought of it like this: [Waxahatchee’s last album] Cerulean Salt is a solid and Ivy Tripp is a gas.”

Waxahatchee performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded May 3, 2015.  Katie Crutchfield performs four songs from her new album “IVY TRIPP” live on KEXP Radio, Can’t get enough Waxahatchee? Same here. That’s why we’ve rounded up some of the best video sessions from the past few months of the Ivy Trip  tour

Songs:
Under A Rock
(Less Than)
The Dirt
La Loose

If you’ve been eagerly awaiting Waxahatchee’s new album Ivy Tripp, you don’t have to wait until its release next week to get a peak at Katie Crutchfield’s latest hazy, sometimes melancholy tunes. You can stream the entire album here. And, for those of you who weren’t lucky enough to catch Waxhatchee’s shows at SXSW two weeks ago, you’ll still be able to catch them during festival season this summer at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago.

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Katie Crutchfield (aka Waxahatchee) describes her new album, “Ivy Tripp”. And of course, she’s right, it certainly is a Waxahatchee record. The songs are a little rough around the edges (some critics call it “DIY”) with lyrics that are at times intimate, at times stubborn and private. There’s the distant and hazy memory of ’90s singer-songwriters. But this time things are slightly different – there’s a little more steel to the sound.

The single “Under a Rock” is described by Crutchfield as “angrier” than previous work and it shows – there’s the painful sense that someone’s leaving you knowing full well they’ll be better off for it by the time they get to the horizon – “it’s that kind of anger that leads to something productive. In that sense its a positive emotion and it’s a hopeful song.”

The song is accompanied by a video, premiered here, that was shot at Philadelphia’s Golden Tea House (sadly, it was the final piece of music recorded at the venue as it closed down shortly afterwards) and continues that acclaimed DIY aesthetic. Much like Katie Crutchfield’s recording process –

 

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Few songwriters capture the feelings of directionlessness and transition quite like Waxahatchee’s Katie Crutchfield. Katie Crutchfield has announced a new Waxahatchee album, Ivy Tripp, out on April 7th from her new label, Merge Records. She produced her new record once again with Swearin members Kyle Gilbride and Keith Spencer, who both worked as co-producers on the last Waxahatchee album, “Cerulean Salt”. Along with the album announcement, she also shared a new track called “Air”.

Ivy Tripp has been described as a “developed and aged version of Waxahatchee.” “My life has changed a lot in the last two years, and it’s been hard for me to process my feelings other than by writing songs,” says Crutchfield in a press release. “I think a running theme (of Ivy Tripp) is steadying yourself on shaky ground and reminding yourself that you have control in situations that seem overwhelming, or just being cognizant in moments of deep confusion or sadness, and learning to really feel emotions and to grow from that.”

In support of the new album, Waxahatchee will embark on a US tour with The Goodbye Party and Girlpool. Looks like this spring will be a season filled with raw indie-rock feels.