Posts Tagged ‘Iron & Wine’

With the release of the second track, “Midnight Sun,” from the new collaborative album between Calexico and Iron and Wine  “Years to Burn” comes a new video featuring animation by Jonny Sanders and illustrations by Sam Beam. The illustrations came out of over 100 paintings Beam did while creating the album cover.

Calexico’s lead singer Joey Burns said of the process behind the new song:

Sam sent some demos the week before we met to record the album. Based on the feel of those demos I wrote the song “Midnight Sun” the day I got to Nashville. I arrived at our rental house the day before everyone else and was happy to find a piano, old pump organ and guitar to do some writing. I was up late and came up with a tune that would bridge both bands’ worlds. I started with a drone in F# and was curious as to where it would take me.

‘Years to Burn’

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Calexico (Joey Burns and John Convertino) and Iron & Wine (Sam Beam) have announced “Years to Burn”the trio’s first collaboration since their 2005 In the Reins EP, not to mention their first full-length album together—due out June 14 via Sub Pop/City Slang. Our first taste of the album has arrived, as well, in the form of its idyllic lead single “Father Mountain.” Rounding out all this good news is an extensive set of North American, European and U.K. joint tour dates, more of which will be added in the weeks to come.

Burns, Convertino and Beam recorded their new album at Nashville’s fabled Sound Emporium studio with producer Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margo Price). Years to Burn features 10 new compositions spanning eight distinct tracks, with Beam handling the bulk of the songwriting alongside Burns, Convertino and their studio contributors: longtime Calexico trumpet player Jacob Valenzuela and Paul Niehaus on pedal steel, with frequent Beam collaborators Rob Burger (Tin Hat Trio) on piano and Sebastian Steinberg (Soul Coughing, Fiona Apple) on bass.

“Life is hard. Awesome. And scary as shit. But it can lift you up if you let it,” Beam says of the album. “These are the things Joey and I write about now. And the title can encapsulate a lot of things. Years to Burn could mean you’re cocky, you’ve got it made. Or, our life is ours to burn, to be inspired. Or you’re burned by life, brutalized. It’s an ambiguous title, because life is complicated. Let’s not talk like teenagers about love, desire, pain, ‘cause we’re not teenagers. And that’s not a bad thing.”

Texan indie rockers Calexico are long term collaborators with Iron and Wine AKA South Carolina songwriter Sam Beam have already worked together on their incredible ‘In The Reins’ EP which they brought out in 2005. They have just announced and extensive Autumn tour which takes them right across the UK in November.

“This project had to find the right time,” adds Burns. “We’re all different people than we were in 2004, and music helps to bridge some of the gaps. For all the things going on in our world and in each of our lives, this connection, this friendship, this love that we have—this album is a vehicle for that bond. It’s a chance to see where we’re at, take stock and be there for our friends.”

The inner peace that comes with that age and experience certainly shines through on “Father Mountain,” a jangly, pastoral reverie that takes on the fuzzy haze of fond memories slowly fading. “Everyone knows and they don’t know / chandelier light ain’t low / They just watch as the time goes,” sings a wistful Beam, looking back on simpler days.

Listen to “Father Mountain” with Calexico and Iron & Wine

The band will perform Our Endless Numbered Days in its entirety (and with an orchestra) in Cincinnati, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

Sub Pop Records and Iron & Wine will celebrate the 15th anniversary of Our Endless Numbered Days with the release of a newly expanded deluxe edition on CD/2xLP/DL worldwide on March 22nd, 2019. This version will feature eight previously never before heard demos, new artwork, and a 12-page booklet including liner notes from author Amanda Petrusich. You can now hear the demo version of “Passing Afternoon” here.

Iron & Wine received its second Grammy nomination in two years as “Best Folk Album” for 2018’s Weed Garden. Their previous nomination was for “Best Americana Album” for 2017’s Beast Epic.

Sam Beam, aka Iron & Wine, released Our Endless Numbered Days, his second album, in March of 2004. It followed his seemingly out of nowhere debut arrival, The Creek Drank the Cradle (2002) which was a quiet word of mouth treasure. Our Endless Numbered Days was recorded in Chicago and was the first in a string of releases to be produced by Brian Deck (Red Red Meat, Modest Mouse, Ugly Casanova, etc.).

Our Endless Numbered Days, which has sold over 556,000 copies, marked many firsts for Beam both professionally and personally and as Petrusich so rightly calls it in her liner notes “Our Endless Numbered Daysis a timeless record about the passage of time.”

Upon its release SPIN called the record a “masterwork” one that is “self-assured, spellbinding, and richly, refreshingly adult.”  Pitchfork, which gave the original album “Best New Music,” had this to say, “An astoundingly progressive record: Beam has successfully transgressed his cultural pigeonhole without sacrificing any of his dusty allure.”

Our Endless Numbered Days (Deluxe Edition)is now available for pre-order from Sub Pop Records. 

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Iron & Wine have shared a new single off their forthcoming EP Weed Garden.

The six-song EP will be released via Sub Pop records on August. 31st, and according to Sam Beam, the band’s main creative force, the title of the new EP stems from getting “into the weeds” of the songwriting process.

The Weed Garden EP will act as the follow-up to Beam’s Beast Epic LP, and you can listen to the first single, “What Hurts Worse,”  Iron & Wine will be releasing the new EP “Weed Garden” – featuring material that was part of the writing phase for Beast Epic, but for various reasons went unfinished

Iron & Wine follow up their 2018 Grammy-nominated full-length Beast Epic with the EP Weed Garden, a collection of material that began about three years ago. The six-song EP features songs that were part of the writing phase for Beast Epic, but went unfinished. They were part of a larger narrative for principal songwriter Sam Beam, who ran out of time to get them where they needed to be for inclusion on Beast Epic. Weed Garden also includes the fan favorite “Waves of Galveston.”

While on tour in the fall of 2017, the final pieces of material took shape and a sense of urgency prevailed in bringing these characters full circle. To resolution. To completion. In January of 2018, Beam and company hunkered down in Chicago at The Loft recording studio to capture these six songs.  No more, no less.

Weed Garden joins the good company of previous Iron & Wine EP’s – The Sea & the Rhythm, Woman King, In the Reins – and in 2018’s attention-span challenged world that’s not a bad thing.

‘Weed Garden’ (Release date: August 31, 2018)

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This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)” is a song by the band Talking Heads, released in November 1983 as the second single from their fifth album Speaking in Tongues. The lyrics were written by David Byrne, and the music was written by Byrne and the other members of the band, Chris Frantz, Tina Weymouth and Jerry Harrison.

Here are three different covers of a beloved song “different” because part of the fun is showcasing how artists that, in theory, are very different nonetheless share the same influences. three pretty slick covers of Talking Heads’ “This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)” . It’s a song that David Byrne has described as a long song:

“That’s a love song made up almost completely of non sequiturs, phrases that may have a strong emotional resonance but don’t have any narrative qualities. It’s a real honest kind of love song. I don’t think I’ve ever done a real love song before. Mine always had a sort of reservation, or a twist. I tried to write one that wasn’t corny, that didn’t sound stupid or lame the way many do. I think I succeeded; I was pretty happy with that.”

it was a full-blown love song. [..] With “This Must Be the Place”, the band simplified their sound dramatically, condensing their sonic palette to the level of small EKG blips (having switched instruments for a lark, this was nearly all they were able to reliably deliver chops-wise) and wringing out only a few chords.”

Throughout the Stop Making Sense version, Byrne and his bandmates perform by a standard lamp, while close-up images of various body parts are projected onto a screen behind them. As revealed on the commentary to the film, the body parts belong to Byrne and his girlfriend (later wife) Adelle Lutz who was also known as Bonnie. When the song reaches a bridge, the musicians step back and Byrne dances with the lamp, a reference to Fred Astaire’s similar dance with a coat-rack in the film Royal Wedding. During the song, Weymouth is seen playing a rare Fender Swinger electric guitar, instead of her usual bass.

We have different studio recorded versions of the tune including a somewhat orchestral take on the tune by Kishi Bashi; a shuffling, playful version by Sure Sure; and A stirring cover of Talking Heads’ “This Must Be The Place (Naïve Melody)”  a sweeping, pensive version by The Lumineers.

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And, if you’re looking for even more Naive Melody you can check out a few live versions of the tune by Car Seat Headrest & Naked Giants , Arcade Fire, Iron & Wine, and MGMT. Honestly, so many people have tackled this tune that this collection just scratches the surface. Enjoy!

The song was covered live by the Montreal-based band Arcade Fire, and is featured as the B-side to their single “Neighborhood #3 (Power Out)”. Their version features David Byrne on guest vocals.

Iron & Wine and Ben Bridwell of Band of Horses performed the song on their covers album Sing into My Mouth. The album’s title is from a lyric in the song.

And finally a nice cover from the excellent Scottish band Admiral Fallow

Released 35 years ago this month, Talking Heads’ SPEAKING IN TONGUES was the group’s commercial breakthrough following a trio of acclaimed albums with producer Brian Eno. The collection includes the quartet’s first Top Ten hit, “Burning Down The House,” the follow-up single “This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)” is  noteworthy. Atypically for the band, “it’s a real honest kind of love song,” said lyricist David Byrne. “I don’t think I’ve ever done a real love song before.” The melody is purposefully simple, with group members switching from their usual instruments to play it, and that simplicity may explain its popularity in soundtracks and cover versions. Cited by Pitchfork as one of the 50 best songs of the 1980s,

SONG OF THE DAY - This Must Be The Place