Posts Tagged ‘Girls Names’

girlsnames

On their fourth album, Northern Ireland’s Girls Names plunge themselves down into a dark, dark place. It’s not as immediate as previous efforts, but I think I like this new one more than anything they’ve done so far. It brings to mind the moody “difficult” post punk the Sound’s All Fall Down and Comsat Angels’ Sleep No More.

‘Karoline’, the latest song to be taken from our new album Stains on Silence, out 15th June on Tough Love Records

Girls Names - Stains on Silence Released on 15th June Hand-numbered, ultra clear vinyl w/ poster - limited to 200 copies Pre-order here

Girls Names release their new album, Stains on Silence, on 15th June. The album is available on several different vinyl formats, with two different front covers:
black vinyl w/ cream cover
orange vinyl w/ black cover (indie stores only -300 copies)
ultral clear vinyl w/ black cover & poster (online only – 200 copies)

It stands to reason that many vital albums come critically close to never being made. The eight-track upshot of doubt, upheaval and financial strain, Stains on Silence by Girls Names is one such release.

Following 2015’s blitzing Arms Around a Vision, and the parting of drummer Gib Cassidy just over a year later, the Belfast band suddenly found themselves facing down a looming void. “There was a finished – and then aborted – mix of the album, which was shelved for six months,” reveals Girls Names frontman Cathal Cully. “We then took a break from all music and went back to full-time work. We chilled out from the stress of rushing the record and not being happy with it, as well as being skint with no impending touring on the cards and constantly having to worry about rent.”

The stumbling blocks that proved a strain became the album’s defining breakthrough. Recorded in various locations including Belfast’s Start Together Studio with Ben McAuley, Cully’s home and the band’s practice space, spontaneous creation, cut-up techniques and self-editing took centre-stage for the first time. “We started tearing the material apart and rebuilding, re-editing and re-recording different parts in my home in early Autumn last year,” says Cully. “When we got them to a place we were happier with we went back into Start Together Studio with Ben McAuley to finalise the mixes to what they are now.”

Where AAAV proved a brazen statement of intent, Stains on Silence bounds forth as its feature-length comedown. What could have seen the band buckle became an opportunity for approaching things tabula rasa. During its two-year transmutation, Cully, bassist Claire Miskimmin and guitarist Philip Quinn had a single aim for their fourth album: to make an old-fashioned record clocking in around 30 to 35 minutes in length that made the listener reach straight for repeat. From the Bang Bang bar-summoning swoon of opener ‘25’ and the submerged disco doom of ‘Haus Proud’ to the rapt, dub-leaning ‘Fragments of a Portrait’, Girls Names have excelled in their goal by forging an LP of synchronous nuance and defiance.

Marked by the presence of drum machines and programming throughout, these eight masterfully-woven tales are once again commandeered by founder Cully, whose words, understated yet defiant, mine purpose and meaning from the mire (“I want to bathe again, I want to swim again / In a pool of twisting bodies, blackened gold.” — ‘25’). But while Stains on Silence came critically close to never being made, having lived with it, reconfigured it, and guided its metamorphosis from flickers of inspiration and half-formed schemes, it’s both a statement of pure perseverance, and a head-on confrontation with ambivalence that couldn’t be more assured.

Tour dates
June
15th – Blackbox, Belfast
19th – Moth Club, London
20th – Oporto, Leeds
21st – Old Hairdressers, Glasgow
22nd – Night People, Manchester
23rd – Whelans, Dublin

Primitive Desire is an 11-track collection of the first ever studio sessions by Girls Names, recorded in 2009 in Belfast. It compiles their debut EP originally released on Captured Tracks, the eight songs that originally featured on the long-out-of print You Should Know By Now mini-EP released on Tough Love, and a here-to-unreleased bonus track.

Primitive Desire is exactly as labeled and provides fans with a document of the band’s early years as a two-piece, fuelled by a distinct nervous energy and nascent dark edge that would manifest itself much more obviously on subsequent albums. Pressed on to limited edition green vinyl. 1000 copies in total. Artwork by Ryan O’Reilly.

http://

Image may contain: text

Our new album, Stains on Silence, is now available to pre-order on limited edition ultra clear vinyl, and comes with a different colour sleeve and poster. Only 200 copies.

It stands to reason that many vital albums come critically close to never being made. The eight-track upshot of doubt, upheaval and financial strain, Stains on Silence by Girls Names is one such release.
Following 2015’s blitzing Arms Around a Vision, and the parting of drummer Gib Cassidy just over a year later, the Belfast band suddenly found themselves facing down a looming void. “There was a finished – and then aborted  mix of the album, which was shelved for six months,” reveals Girls Names frontman Cathal Cully. “We then took a break from all music and went back to full-time work. We chilled out from the stress of rushing the record and not being happy with it, as well as being skint with no impending touring on the cards and constantly having to worry about rent.” 

The stumbling blocks that proved a strain became the album’s defining breakthrough. Recorded in various locations including Belfast’s Start Together Studio with Ben McAuley, Cully’s home and the band’s practice space, spontaneous creation, cut-up techniques and self-editing took centre-stage for the first time. “We started tearing the material apart and rebuilding, re-editing and re-recording different parts in my home in early Autumn last year,” says Cully. “When we got them to a place we were happier with we went back into Start Together Studio with Ben to finalise the mixes to what they are now.”

Where AAAV proved a brazen statement of intent, Stains on Silence bounds forth as its feature-length comedown. What could have seen the band buckle became an opportunity for approaching things tabula rasa. During its two-year transmutation, Cully, bassist Claire Miskimmin and guitarist Philip Quinn had a single aim for their fourth album: to make an old-fashioned record clocking in around 30 to 35 minutes in length that made the listener reach straight for repeat. From the Bang Bang bar-summoning swoon of opener ’25’ and the submerged disco doom of ‘Haus Proud’ to the rapt, dub-leaning ‘Fragments of a Portrait’, Girls Names have excelled in their goal by forging an LP of synchronous nuance and defiance. 

http://

Marked by the presence of drum machines and programming throughout, these eight masterfully-woven tales are once again commandeered by band founder Cully, whose words, understated yet defiant, mine purpose and meaning from the mire (“I want to bathe again, I want to swim again / In a pool of twisting bodies, blackened gold.” — ‘25’). But while Stains on Silence came critically close to never being made, having lived with it, reconfigured it, and guided its metamorphosis from flickers of inspiration and half-formed schemes, it’s both a statement of pure perseverance, and a head-on confrontation with ambivalence that couldn’t be more assured. 

Releases May 4th, 2018

On September 16th, Girls Names will release Revisionism, a 5-track EP of remixes featuring Mikey Young from Total Control, Broken English Club, Shift Work, Group Zero, and Tom Furse of The Horrors

The Belfast quartet Girls Names will release Revisionism, a collection of remixes of their work by other musicians and producers, this Friday and you can listen to all of the remixes above right now.

The remixes capture the bleak essence of Girls Names‘ music and transform the five songs into pieces for the dance floor. While Mickey Young of Total Control has turned ‘Zero Triptych‘ into a synth-driven, almost vaporwave-indebted, jam, Broken English Club goes for a fully fledged acid-electro attack on ‘A Hunger Artist’. The Group Zero makes ‘Malaga’ sound almost like it was recorded by Factory Floor and finally, The Horrors’ Tom Furse finds a way of reducing ‘I Was You’ to its barest, droning remnants.

http://

http://

http://

‘A Hunger Artist’ is the second song to be taken from Girls Names third album, “Arms Around a Vision”, out 2nd October 2015.

Where ‘Reticence’ was all primordial clang and clatter, recalling the best moments of early ’80s no wave and its forerunners – think Glenn Branca and Rhys Chatham’s respective guitar ensembles – bookending one of the most immediate, accessible songs the band have ever written at its core, ‘A Hunger Artist’ is an altogether more colossal and meandering beast.

While its chiming guitar introduction might again bear passing resemblance to Branca’s deft melodic interplay, its much quicker to cut to the chase. And what a chase it is: leading you over moonlit autobahns and down dark European back alleys. Drawing to mind Neu! and Roxy-era Eno, the Northern Irish quartet lay down a motorik groove that rarely lets up across its almost six-minute runtime, allowing gossamer synths and insistent bass to dance atop with aplomb.

Alongside this, the band are set to return to London for a one-off show this October (the 19th) at the historic 100 Club: a not-to-be-missed opportunity to see Arms Around a Vision brought to stunning life in the live setting.

UK/EU Live Dates
July 16th | Bagnacciuga, Fano, Italy
July 17th | Bolognetti Rocks, Bologna, Italy
July 18th | A Night Like This Festival, nr. Turin, Italy
Oct 19th | 100 Club, London TICKETS

 

http://

Northern Ireland’s Girls Names return this autumn with their third full-length album, “Arms Around a Vision”, due for an October 2nd release via long-term home, Tough Love Records.

Pre-order LP, CD or limited edition cream vinyl
smarturl.it/GirlsNames.ToughLove

“We look to Europe for inspiration. For romance. For the idea of a better life,” says the band’s frontman, Cathal Cully, when discussing the album. “For me, living in Belfast just makes you focus on your own art.”

Girls Names formed in Belfast, but they’ve long considered themselves a European band. The distinction is important – their vision of Europe is one of weird, labyrinthian histories, blackest-ever-black coffee, and long drives to dismal places. Romantic notions for those of a certain disposition, but behind the thousand-yard stares they’ve always been a soft-hearted lot. As the title of Arms Around a Vision would suggest, they’re all set to let love in.

The band initially came together as a relatively lean two-piece back in the summer of 2010, but over the course of a handful of EPs and three very different albums, they’ve grown in number and ambition. Their last album, The New Life, was an unexpected underground hit in early 2013, taking the band around the world and garnering much critical praise, culminating in nominations for both the Northern Irish and Irish Music Prizes. Emboldened by the reception to that record, in March they returned with an 11-minute single that was played in full on Radio 1 and, typically, does not feature on their new album. Girls Names like to do things a little differently.

On Arms Around a Vision, they’re more widescreen than ever but also more direct and aggressive. The bass, drums and guitars are still there, but so are saxophones, organs, detuned broken guitars and pianos, and even sheets of metal assaulted with hammers. Conceptually, Arms Around a Vision acts as a love letter to European elegance – Italian futurism, Russian constructivism, Germany’s Zero Group and both Neubaten and Bowie’s Berlin.

Love and pain, romance and fucking. It’s all in there somewhere. Grand claims, perhaps, but in an ever bleak world, why not skygaze? The album opens with ‘Reticence’, a song in two parts that’s half metallic knockout, half midnight swagger. It sounds unlike anything they’ve ever done before, and is a perfect primer for an album that treads a course between Eno-era Roxy sleaze, Birthday Party dissonance and M.E.S’ three R’s: repetition, repetition, repetition.

As confident as it sounds, hardship has equally played a role in shaping Arms Around a Vision. “I’m not starving or anything, but I’ve practically been living hand to mouth since I was 22,” confirms Cully. “Most guitar music now is just a playground for the rich middle classes and it’s really boring and elitist. We’re elitist in our own way, in that we’re on our own and you can’t fuck with us when we’ve nothing to lose”. The near-6 minute ‘A Hunger Artist’ tackles that subject full on, addressing that age old adage of suffering for one’s art.

While the songs aren’t narrative-driven as such – the band still generally favour abstraction and ambiguity – there is a consistent underlying message: “We’ve got nothing. We’ve never had anything. And we don’t expect to. The only person I ever wanted to impress was myself. I’ve never got anywhere close to succeeding in doing that until this album. I’m proud of it. I think I can start saying I’m a musician now.”

Tracklisting:

1. Reticence
2. An Artificial Spring
3. Desire Oscillations
4. (Obsession)
5. Chrome Rose
6. A Hunger Artist
7. Málaga
8. Dysmorphia
9. (Convalescence)
10. Exploit Me
11. Take Out the Hand
12. I Was You

http://

Last we heard from Irish indie-pop outfit Girls Names, they had switched up their style on the elegant, entrancing 2013 album The New Life, looking towards the gleaming guitars and dark surfaces of vintage 1980s post-punk. Now they’re zoning out even further with the awesome eleven-minute single “Zero Triptych,” which will see release on 12″ via Tough Love Records.  Not only did I think it was the best name for a group of artists I’d ever heard, but their ideas, outlook and, most importantly, work struck a chord with me, Not quite a conventional ‘song’, nor EP, we knew about a year and a half ago that this piece of music was evolving into something not conventionally defined in the classic rock/pop vernacular. It’s essentially three different sections intertwined, hence the ‘triptych’., I don’t think this is something we’d have ordinarily tried were it not for the confidence we gained from touring a new line-up around Europe, when we learned to be a new band

taken from the second album this four piece from Belfast have recorded two albums “Dead to Me” and “The New Life”