Posts Tagged ‘Bury Me At Makeout Creek’

Image may contain: 1 person

Mitski has shared a new live video shot during her run of four sold-out shows at Brooklyn Steel in New York City last year. The video shows her passionate, emotive performance of the fan favorite “Drunk Walk Home” from her 2014 album Bury Me At Makeout Creek. The Brooklyn Steel shows were part of an ongoing series of tours behind her hit record Be the Cowboy, which was widely considered to be among the best albums of 2018.

“I asked filmmaker Derrick Belcham to film some of the four Brooklyn Steel dates we did at the end of last year’s U.S. tour, mostly to commemorate the first big Be The Cowboy tour, especially since I knew we wouldn’t repeat the same set again after that round of tours,” Mitski said in a statement. “Now that we’ve started to tour a new set this year, I wanted to put this video out as a goodbye to this old set, and a thank you to everyone who came to the shows last year.”

Belcham is a Canadian filmmaker based in Brooklyn, N.Y., who, prior to directing “Drunk Walk Home” for Mitski, has worked with artists like Philip Glass, Paul Simon, Laurie Anderson and Steve Reich.

“Drunk Walk Home” recorded live at Brooklyn Steel on December 1st, 2018. ‘Be The Cowboy’ Out Now on Dead Oceans.

Mitski is currently on tour in the American South with Bay Area songwriter Jay Som.

The first half of the album’s opening track is a beautiful, restrained ballad, which aches with quivering vulnerability. The second half of that same track is a screeching, thumping rock song. And the rest of the album continues in this brilliantly contradictory vein, layering Mitski’s emotive, scale-leaping vocals over squelchy rock riffs and a sea of noise. Its lyrics, too, are astoundingly beautiful.

Mitski’s broad, tremulous vocals and sly humor recall  maybe Angel Olsen, while the equal split between unencumbered acoustic pining and pummeling, mid-fi indie rock respectively aligns her with labelmates Frankie Cosmos.  And it lays out a compact scene of domestic bliss, littered with specificities—a lover who wears socks in bed, reads Objectivist poetry, and serves as the breeze in her Austin nights. The final acknowledgement of romantic contentment occurs less than three minutes into the album Bury Me at Makeout Creek and by its bitter end, the only thing that can bring Mitski any  comfort is the thought of dying with a clean apartment (“They’ll think of me kindly/ When they come for my things”).

The way an outsider might view her narrator is duly noted just by the loaded title of the song “Townie”—this is someone who’s stuck around far too long after the party ended and almost certainly has a distorted perspective as to whether it was any fun to begin with. “Townie” previews a horrible night out with all the protraction and morbid glee of a suicide pact. Her images are startlingly violent—she wants a love that falls like a body from the balcony, she’s holding her breath with a baseball bat  and sing-along hooks, Mitski shouts, “I’m not gonna be what my daddy wants me to be…I’m gonna be what my body wants me to be,” a call for freedom that’s galvanizing from a teenage perspective, but increasingly sad as songs like “I Don’t Smoke” and “Drunk Walk Home” lay out the terrible life plan the body of this self-described 25 year-old “tall child” has for her.

Though not necessarily nostalgia, the sound of Bury Me at Makeout Creek is inventive and resourceful in a ’90s-indie way. The choruses here soar like power pop, but are subdued by tempo and fidelity, while cheap drum machines are deployed as much for their tone as their rhythm. And even when Bury Me has full band arrangements, everything calls attention to the narrator’s loneliness—awkwardly thumbed basslines, slapdash drumming, a mocking chorale on “Carry Me Out”, organ drones that could pass for someone nodding off on the keys.

http://

The craft here is obvious, as is the accruing confidence of someone who’s developed a compelling voice in obscurity. Mitski can lay on the emo melodrama (“One word from you/ And I would jump off of this ledge I’m on, baby”) just enough so things aren’t too real and mundane, and while these songs are first-person and personal, they’re meant for an audience.

Mitski Miyawaki is starting to gain a bit of separation from her band; Bury Me at Makeout Creek still sounds like a breakthrough album.

Of all the disparate sounds to be found on Mitski’s 2013 self-released LP Retired From Sad, New Career In Business“, there is none more devastating than her vocal quaver on the song Square.” The song is a chronicle of a decaying relationship, a convoluted interrogation of why things seem so complicated when “God’s very simple and love shouldn’t burn.” Mitski’s pointed lyrical turns-of-phrase have a tendency to silence her audience with their simplicity, She recently performed at SXSW. Earlier this month, Don Giovanni Records announced that they will release the deluxe edition of Mitski’s 2014 record “Bury Me At Makeout Creek”, which will include a series of extra bonus tracks. A live piano version of “Square” will follow the record’s concluding song “Last Words Of A Shooting Star.”

http://

Mitski Miyawaki knows how to balance fragility with aggression. “Bury Me At Makeout Creek” is emotionally draining; sometimes it pummels so unrelentingly you can’t breathe, and other times it whispers and looks away shyly. Though Bury Me At Makeout Creek is Mitski’s third LP, it’s her first since learning to play guitar (the other two are heavily orchestral), which means it translates better into the grimy basement world. But Makeout Creek isn’t a Colt 45 party album; it’s an album that nestles itself in your chest cavity and then starts to expand, crushing all your other organs. I know that doesn’t sound very nice, but it is. “First Love/Late Spring” is such a good song I want to cry every time I hear it, even if I felt really good when I started listening to it. And that means something. – LP

http://

Mitski Miyawaki knows how to balance fragility with aggression. “Bury Me At Makeout Creek” is emotionally draining; sometimes it pummels so unrelentingly you can’t breathe, and other times it whispers and looks away shyly. Though Bury Me At Makeout Creek is Mitski’s third LP, it’s her first since learning to play guitar (the other two are heavily orchestral), which means it translates better into the grimy basement world. it’s an album that nestles itself in your chest cavity and then starts to expand, crushing all your other organs. I know that doesn’t sound very nice, but it is. “First Love/Late Spring” is such a good song I want to cry every time I hear it, even if I felt really good when I started listening to it. And that means something.