Posts Tagged ‘Andy Jones’

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A frenetic London trio made up of Oli Burslem & Andy Jones (who were born in the black country in the West Midlands& raised in the suburbs) joined by kiwi drummer Elliot Rawson who bangs the drums.

They then moved to London and started selling curiosities in markets, which led to them meeting other musicians (a family table to Spiritualized’s John Coxon, an antique german map to Bill Drummond, a chair to a caribou member, a model ship to a scottish band – not that one – and an antique dildo to a peace associate). they also put on an artwork exhibition with Thurston Moore. in the meantime, songs were written in a basement of a furniture store in east London. it was dark and Yak were born.

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A shambolic mix of psychedelic blues and manic punk, ripping open the cushions of a vintage paisley couch and lighting the stuffing on fire . For Fans of: The Birthday Party, A Place to Bury Strangers, Kurt Vile

You Should Pay Attention to this London trio Yak’s introduction to Jack White’s Third Man Records was a 10-minute stoner rock take on folk standard “Cumberland Gap,” a distant cry from Lonnie Donegan’s frenetic skiffle version that was a hit in the Fifties. According to the group’s gregarious singer-guitarist an ex-thrift store operator who used to host jam sessions in the shop’s basement. White’s friend Ben Swank of Soledad Brothers saw their live performance and the rest is garage-rock history. Following up hard-charging Fat Possum singles “Hungry Heart” and “Plastic People,” the No EP just arrived on Third Man. Its three songs capture the group’s blistering live energy and sinister melodic leanings in just over seven minutes. Produced by Pulp bassist Steve Mackey, the EP was recorded while bassist Andy Jones was in denial about a broken finger, which didn’t slow him a bit. 

They Say: The No EP didn’t take much time,” Burslem says. “We got it mixed, then sent it to Third Man and they were really into it. It was kind of a painless experience. We tried not to fuck around with the initial live recordings we had that day. All of the bands we like, it’s not too edited, I suppose. Once you start editing conversations or editing anything, it can kind of lose the charm of it. I always have loads of ideas. I sit at my desk here with notes, loads of nonsense. I try and fill my brain with as much clutter as possible, and then we get together as a band and vomit it all out. Loaded with amp-rattling feedback and Burslem’s unfiltered musings at the top of his lungs, “No” is a sludgy garage stomper.

Yak