VARIOUS ARTISTS – ” Shake The Foundations: Militant Funk & The Post-Punk Dancefloor 1978-1984 ” Cherry Red Box Set

Posted: January 22, 2021 in Classic Albums, MUSIC
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

If you know Gang of Four, PiL and The Slits inside and out, this three-disc box sets heads mostly to the fringes of the original post-punk disco scene

Making for a nice follow-up to the EXEK reissue is this new three-disc compilation of scratchy disco from the original post-punk era. The mix of funk, disco, punk, dub and bleak industrial noise is formative to this writer and its a sound that will forever be appealing to me, whether it’s the original article (Gang of Four, ESG, PiL, The Slits, The Pop Group), the ’00s second-wavers (Liars, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Radio 4, Franz Ferdinand), and more recent acts like EXEK or Working Men’s Club.

For those who think they’ve heard it all, as well as folks who only casually know the heavy hitters, new three-disc compilation “Shake The Foundations: Militant Funk & The Post-Punk Dancefloor 1978-1984” opens a few new doors and brushes the dust off some forgotten acts from the era. While it doesn’t have Gang of Four, The Slits or Au Pairs — probably for budgetary reasons — it does have great tracks from lesser-known acts like Medium Medium, The Higsons, PiL bassist Jah Wobble, punk poet John Cooper ClarkeGlaxo Babies, Blue Rondo A La Turk, Specials-offshoot Fun Boy Three, pre-Breakfast CluSimple Minds, very early Haircut 100Ian Dury, Bauhaus offshoot Tones On TailVisage, Furniture, Family Fodder, and more. There are also plenty of bands who are new to me, including The Chicken Granny, Viscous Pink, and C Cat Trance.

Bill Brewster, who wrote the great history of DJing, Last Night a DJ Saved My Life and compiled this box set, says he took the same approach to this collection as he would a DJ set. “The important thing was not to impress James Brown, emulate the Fatback Band or wear Kraftwerk’s game-face. The point was to have a go. ‘Shake The Foundations’ is not a comprehensive look at post-punk, so much as a shakily hand-drawn map of a particular area. It’s what happened when the post-punk fallout collided with the dancefloor, and forty years later we’re still feeling its effects.” 1980 single that also appeared on their Nine Months To The Disco debut album. Tony Wrafter, Dan Catsis and Charlie Llewellin eventually left and formed Maximum Joy with singer Janine Rainforth.

Shake The Foundations: Militant Funk & The Post-Punk Dancefloor 1978-1984 is out March 26th via Cherry Red Records. You can check out the full tracklist and preorder the album here and meanwhile this is the compilation’s title inspiration, Glaxo Babies’ “Shake the Foundations”:

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