Posts Tagged ‘Transangelic Exodus’

Ezra Furman at Bowery Ballroom

Ezra Furman, currently on tour behind his latest release Transangelic Exodus, stopped by NYC’s Brooklyn Steel . Playing in front of a beautifully-designed set backdrop, Ezra played many cuts from the new record, such as the driving “Suck the Blood from My Wound” and anthemic single “Love You So Bad.” Ezra also played some older favorites like “My Zero,” and covered Kate Bush’s “Hounds of Love.”

Furman, who has released solo albums as well as albums with his bands Ezra Furman and the Harpoons and Ezra Furman and the Boy-Friends, identifies as gender fluid. A musician himself, he seems the ideal writer for an exploration into the many iterations of Lou Reed’s persona.

Ezra Furman has also penned the most recent installment in the 33 1/3 book series, which focuses on Lou Reed‘s classic album “Transformer”. Here’s the book’s official synopsis:

Transformer, Lou Reed’s most enduringly popular album, is described with varying labels: it’s often called a glam rock album, a proto-punk album, a commercial breakthrough for Lou Reed, and an album about being gay. And yet, it doesn’t neatly fit into any of these descriptors. Buried underneath the radio-friendly exterior lie coded confessions of the subversive, wounded intelligence that gives this album its staying power as a work of art. Here Lou Reed managed to make a fun, accessible rock’n’roll record that is also a troubled meditation on the ambiguities-sexual, musical and otherwise-that defined his public persona and helped make him one of the most fascinating and influential figures in rock history. Through close listening and personal reflections, songwriter Ezra Furman explores Reed’s and Transformer‘s unstable identities, and the secrets the songs challenge us to uncover.

Ezra Furman will be in Austin next week for SXSW, Ezra is also part of Willie Nelson’s “Luck Reunion” fest at his ranch during SXSW.

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Ezra Furman shares live performance video for “Driving down To L.A.”

With his new album Transangelic Exodus due for release 9th February via Bella UnionEzra Furman has  shared a live performance video of the track “Driving Down To L.A”Filmed at SPACE in Evanston, Illinois, over the course of a day, Furman and his band The Visions performed three songs from the new album live for the first time, an exclusive for an attentive audience. The band had been building and creating a special stage design to set the world of Transangelic Exodus.

Transangelic Exodus is a new landmark for the American singer-songwriter: “Not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” according to its author. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga.”

The music is as much of an intense, dramatic event, full of brilliant hooks, with an equally evolved approach to recorded sound to match Furman’s narrative vision. In honour of this shift, his backing band has been newly christened: The Boy-Friends are dead, long live The Visions. In other words, the man who embodies the title of his last album ‘Perpetual Motion People’ is still on the move… Or, in the vernacular of the new album, on the run.

Ezra furman transangelic exodus packshot

Ezra Furman will be live in-store at Rough Trade East to perform tracks from new album ‘Transangelic Exodus’, released 9th February on Bella Union. 

One of the breakout success stories of 2015 following the release of his hugely acclaimed album Perpetual Motion People, Ezra Furman releases his new album Transangelic Exodus in March. Transangelic Exodus is a new landmark for the American singer-songwriter: “Not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” according to its author. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga.”

The music is as much of an intense, dramatic event, full of brilliant hooks, with an equally evolved approach to recorded sound to match Furman’s narrative vision. In honour of this shift, his backing band has been newly christened: The Boy-Friends are dead, long live The Visions. In other words, the man who embodies the title of his last album ‘Perpetual Motion People’ is still on the move… Or, in the vernacular of the new album, on the run.

Ezra Furman live at Rough Trade East – London Thursday 8th February 2018

Today Bella Union Records are celebrating the release of Ezra Furman’s beautiful, pioneering, thrilling, tremendous new album “Transangelic Exodus”, which is available now via Bella Union! Transangelic Exodus is a new landmark for the American singer-songwriter: “Not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” according to its author. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga.”

Transangelic Exodus Ezra Furman’s second album for Bella Union, is a new landmark its  “not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” according to its author. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. ” The music is as much of an intense, dramatic event, full of brilliant hooks, with an equally evolved approach to recorded sound to match Furman’s narrative vision. In honour of this shift, his backing band has been newly christened: The Boy-Friends are dead, long live The Visions. In other words, the man who embodies the title of his last album Perpetual Motion People is still on the move… Or in the vernacular of the new album, on the run. His musical DNA remains intact – a thrilling, literate form of garage-punk rooted in The Velvet Underground, Jonathan Richman and ‘50s rock’n’roll.
Standout tracks include the album’s lead single Driving Down To LA, a sparse, but explosive, mix of doo-wop and digital crunch.

Another is the haunting Compulsive Liar. Transangelic Exodus addresses another kind of coming out, as Furman addresses his Jewish faith on record much more openly than before, from the shivery ballad God Lifts Up the Lowly (which includes a verse in Hebrew) to the exquisite Psalm 151 and the line “I believe in God but I don’t believe we’re getting out of this one” in Come Here Get Away From Me, a heady blend of rock’n’roll rumble and ghostly clarinet. Crossing between love, gender, sexuality and religion, and singing in solidarity with the innocent, persecuted, oppressed and threatened, Ezra Furman has soundtracked the current fear and loathing across America like no other, while pushing ahead with his own agenda, always on the move.

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“2016 was a hard year,” Furman notes in a statement. “While the political and cultural conversation devolved in a very threatening way, we travelled and toured a lot. We saw ourselves coming to the end of what we were, and we wanted to become something new.”

This sea change included an album full of memoir-like material, in which Furman opens up more about his personal journey of coming out as queer and gender-fluid, as well as addresses his Jewish faith. “Not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” explains Furman. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga.” Speaking about the concept behind the record, Furman continues,

“The narrative thread is I’m in love with an angel, and a government is after us, and we have to leave home because angels are illegal, as is harbouring angels. The term ‘transangelic’ refers to the fact people become angels because they grow wings. They have an operation, and they’re transformed. And it causes panic because some people think it’s contagious, or it should just be outlawed. The album still works without the back story, though. What’s essential is the mood — paranoid, authoritarian, the way certain people are stigmatized. It’s a theme in American life right now, and other so-called democracies.”

Furman cites Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly, Vampire Weekend’s Modern Vampires of the City, Kanye West’s Yeezus, and Angel Olsen’s Burn Your Fire For No Witness as influences on Transangelic Exodus.

acclaim for “Transangelic Exodus”

“Thelma & Louise meets Angels In America… Pop has plenty of angels, and Transangelic Exodus joins them in the firmament.” Mail On Sunday – 5 Stars ***** (Album of the Week)  “This is one of the most probing and pioneering avant–retro–pop albums of the age.” Classic Rock – 8/10

“By way of glam, garage rock, baroque’n’roll balladry and declamation, Furman fashions a bold and engrossing manifesto.” Sunday Times 

“Both sonically and lyrically, it’s an album that is explicitly, thrillingly transgressive, and is already an early contender for one of the albums of the year.” Uncut – 8/10

“His seventh album vibrates with fear, rage and fierce defiance… Transangelic Exodus feels like an appropriately angry response to a repressive political moment.” MOJO – 4 Stars ****

Furman’s music has been rethought, cut up, redrafted into something irresistibly modern. The songs are tremendous – melodic, unsettling and laugh–out–loud brilliant.” Q – 4 Stars ****

Transangelic Exodus sets out for fresh horizons with a full tank of passion, purpose, political rage, raucous invention and rock’n’roll fire.” Record Collector – 5 Stars ****

“A sense of defiance and unrest runs throughout Transangelic Exodus… Timely and uncompromising, it feels like a record of real importance.” DIY – 4 Stars ****

“This is a fascinating, mature set from an artist who feels as vital as ever.” DORK – 4 Stars ****

We loved Suck The Blood From My Wound, the last single Ezra Furman shared from his much anticipated new long player Transangelic Exoduswhich will be released on the 9th February on Bella Union Records.

Now we have his latest offering from the record, the jagged, agitated, and it must be said, spectacularly named “Maraschino-Red Dress $8.99 at Goodwill”.

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Ezra Furman

The Boyfriends are dead, long live The Visions. Describing upcoming album, “Transangelic Exodus”, Ezra Furman has suggested it is, “not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir. A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga”. We can’t be alone in thinking that’s the most exciting description of a record we’ve heard in many years. This narrative vision is matched in a different approach to recording and writing music, one that is accompanied by a change in backing band, or at least a re-christening of an old one.

Ahead of Tranangelic Exodus’ release in February, Ezra Furman has recently shared the video to his latest single, “Love You So Bad”. Propelled by an energetic string quartet, Love You So Bad is adventurous, inspired pop music; unique and intense, at once very Ezra Furman and entirely different to anything he’s previously produced. Lyrically, it’s a record of contrast and contradiction, surmised in the opening lines, “you know I love you so bad, I don’t believe in love”. Throughout the track, Ezra seems to question his place in the world, and how much of that was down to opportunity and fate; Ezra presents snapshots of a youth at, “the back of the classroom” in a “garbage, small town rat trap”. Perhaps the ultimate damnation of the injustice at heart of the track is presented in the off-hand way Ezra quips, “I always knew I was bad”. In a world where so many aren’t ever given the chance to make a life for themselves, Ezra Furman is singing for the downtrodden, persecuted and oppressed, and simultaneously stepping ever more confidently through his own personal journey; an artist always on the move and more vital than ever.

Transangelic Exodus is out February 9th via Bella Union. Click HERE for more information on Ezra Furman.

Ezra Furman will return with new album ‘Transangelic Exodus’ on 9th February 2018.

Transangelic Exodus is a new landmark for the American singer-songwriter: “Not a concept record, but almost a novel, or a cluster of stories on a theme, a combination of fiction and a half-true memoir,” according to its author. “A personal companion for a paranoid road trip. A queer outlaw saga.”

http://

Furman, who’s queer and gender-fluid, speaks from experience. “What’s essential is the mood—paranoid, authoritarian, the way certain people are stigmatised. It’s a theme in American life right now, and other so-called democracies,” he continued. The inclusion of the word “trans” in the album’s title was similarly deliberate.

Furman also said he wanted to make the new record feel “more original,” a process that involved multiple demo versions and rearrangements. He’s renamed his backing band for the occasion: formerly known as the Harpoons and then as the Boy-Friends, they’re now called the Visions. Truthfully, none of this information is required to enjoy “Love You So Bad”—it’s just a good song by Ezra Furman.

Ezra Furman tickets