Posts Tagged ‘Time To Go Home’

 

Time to Go Home artwork

Seattle post-punk female four piece return with their second album and their first for Sub Pop offshoot, Hardly Art. ‘Time to Go Home’ sees Chastity Belt take the nights out and bad parties of their past to their stretching points, watch the world around them break apart in anticipatory haze, and rebuild it in their own image with stunning clarity before anyone gets hung over. Cool, twangy and languid guitars meet vocals dripping in melancholy.

Let yourself be swept away by this stunning, meditative clip for Chastity Belt’s “Lydia,” off of their widely-acclaimed 2015 album “Time to Go Home”.

Chastity Belt is a rock band consisting of four friends – guitarists Julia Shapiro and Lydia Lund, bassist Annie Truscott, and drummer Gretchen Grimm. They met in a tiny college town in Eastern Washington, but their story begins for real in Seattle, that celebrated home of Macklemore and the Twelfth Man. Following a post-grad summer apart, a handful of shows and enthusiastic responses from the city’s DIY community led them, as it has countless others, into a cramped practice space. They emerged with a debut album, No Regerts, sold it out faster than anyone involved thought possible, and toured America, a country that embraced them with open-ish arms. Now they’re back and the tab is settled, the lights are out, the birds are making noise even though the sun isn’t really up yet: it’s Time to Go Home, their second long-player and first for Hardly Art.

In the outside world, they realized something crucial: they didn’t have to play party songs now that their audience didn’t consist exclusively of inebriated 18-22 year olds, as it did in that college town. Though still built on a foundation of post-post-punk energy, jagged rhythms, and instrumental moves that couldn’t be anyone else’s, the songs they grew into in the months that followed are equal parts street-level takedown and gray-skied melancholy. They embody the sensation of being caught in the center of a moment while floating directly above it; Shapiro’s world spins around her on “On The Floor,” grounded by Grimm and Truscott’s most commanding playing committed to tape. They pay tribute to writer Sheila Heti on “Drone” and John Carpenter with “The Thing,” and deliver a parallel-universe stoner anthem influenced by Electrelane with “Joke.”

Recorded by José Díaz Rohena at the Unknown, a deconsecrated church and former sail factory in Anacortes, and mixed with a cathedral’s worth of reverb by Matthew Simms (guitarist for legendary British post-punks and one-time tourmates Wire), Time to Go Home sees Chastity Belt take the nights out and bad parties of their past to their stretching points, watch the world around them break apart in anticipatory haze, and rebuild it in their own image with stunning clarity before anyone gets hung over.

TRACK LISTING

1. Drone
2. Trapped
3. Why Try
4. Cool Slut
5. On The Floor
6. The Thing
7. Joke
8. Lydia
9. IDC
10. Time To Go Home

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Meet the women of Chastity Belt in their charming new music video for “Cool Slut,” off of them acclaimed new record Time to Go Home, out now on Hardly Art Records. Chastity Belt is a rock band consisting of four friends – guitarists Julia Shapiro and Lydia Lund, bassist Annie Truscott, and drummer Gretchen Grimm.

They met in a tiny college town in Eastern Washington, but their story begins for real in Seattle, that celebrated home of Macklemore and the Twelfth Man. Following a post-grad summer apart, a handful of shows and enthusiastic responses from the city’s DIY community led them, as it has countless others, into a cramped practice space. They emerged with a debut album, No Regerts, sold it out faster than anyone involved thought possible, and toured America, a country that embraced them with open-ish arms. Now they’re back and the tab is settled, the lights are out, the birds are making noise even though the sun isn’t really up yet: it’s “Time to Go Home”, their second long-player and first for Hardly Art Records.

Recorded by José Díaz Rohena, Time to Go Home sees Seattle four-piece Chastity Belt take the nights out and bad parties of their past to their stretching points, watch the world around them break apart in anticipatory haze, and rebuild it in their own image with stunning clarity before anyone gets hung over. Time to Go Home is their first full-length for Hardly Art.

Chastity Belt performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded March 28th, 2015.

Songs:
Dull
Time To Go Home
Drone
Joke

Members: Julia Shapiro Gretchen Grimm Lydia Lund Annie Truscott

In the outside world, they realized something crucial: they didn’t have to play party songs now that their audience didn’t consist exclusively of inebriated 18-22 year olds, as it did in that college town. Though still built on a foundation of post-post-punk energy, jagged rhythms, and instrumental moves that couldn’t be anyone else’s, the songs they grew into in the months that followed are equal parts street-level takedown and gray-skied melancholy. They embody the sensation of being caught in the center of a moment while floating directly above it; Shapiro’s world spins around her on “On The Floor,” grounded by Grimm and Truscott’s most commanding playing committed to tape. They pay tribute to writer Sheila Heti on “Drone” and John Carpenter with “The Thing,” and deliver a parallel-universe stoner anthem influenced by Electrelane with “Joke.”

Recorded by José Díaz Rohena at the Unknown, a deconsecrated church and former sail factory in Anacortes, and mixed with a cathedral’s worth of reverb by Matthew Simms (guitarist for legendary British post-punks and one-time tourmates Wire), Time to Go Home sees Chastity Belt take the nights out and bad parties of their past to their stretching points, watch the world around them break apart in anticipatory haze, and rebuild it in their own image with stunning clarity before anyone gets hungover.

Let yourself be swept away by this stunning, meditative clip for Chastity Belt’s “Lydia,” off of their widely-acclaimed 2015 album Time to Go Home. 

The not-so-secret weapon wielded on Seattle punk group Chastity Belt‘s second album is performative lassitude. Time To Go Home is full of slow, hazy songs whose tempos and degrees of exerted energy are an exact inversion of their weighty subject matter. Feminist political statements are couched in eye rolls, designed to combat sexism by belittling it. The record is mellow, yet cohesive — so an interesting thing happens when one of those songs is plucked from its context and turned into a single, as is the case with “Lydia,” the video for which we’re premiering here: That languorous vibe comes across as downright pretty.

Chastity Belt’s music isn’t abrasive, and never ugly. But “Lydia” in particular uses a guitar line that approaches sunny, and is the only one of the album’s 10 tracks to feature Lydia Lund’s vocals, which is softer than that of front woman Julia Shapiro. For the video, director Shaun Libman married the vulnerability and accessibility of Lund’s voice with equally dreamy visuals. Libman describes the artistry of the video’s set —constructed from hand-cut paper scenery, and filmed in striking black and white — as “an experiment. We were hoping we could shoot the paper in such a way that it would look dreamy and strange, both delicate and sturdy. Every shape and curve…embodies the emotional state of the main character.”

Time To Go Home is a punk album, and “Lydia” is a punk song. But Lund’s voice, as well as the song and video it inspired, have a softness and warm spaciousness that stand out from the rest of the record’s practiced cool.

Time To Go Home is available now on Hardly Art.

Filmed on the band’s Spring 2015 tour, this new music video offers a candid look at life on the road with Seattle band Chastity Belt. “Joke” can be heard on Time to Go Home, out now on Hardly Art records.Take earplugs, tampons, eat air when you’re hungry and never look fanboys in the eye are the Seattle girl band’s top tips for taking the gruelling out of touring, Straight out of Seattle’s DIY scene are Chastity Belt – a slacker rock band made up of friends and females Julia Shapiro, Lydia Lund, Annie Truscott and Gretchen Grimm. Their new album, “Time to Go Home”, includes an anti-slut-shaming anthem Cool Slut. The band made the video themselves and it includes a lot of footage of gals being gals, drinking wine, skipping, dancing, playing the harp, roller blading and playing the clarinet – just your typical gal stuff.

Chastity Belt’s latest creation is “Joke”, another perfect depiction of modern femininity. In their new video – premiered below – the band give a snapshot of life on the road: drinking, driving, working out, sinking celebratory shots and taking selfies.But what else can we learn from Chastity Belt about being band chicks? To help us out, the band have knocked together a failsafe girl guide to tour survival.

What to eat while on the road
Touring can be tough on the body. You’re immobile for hours, and filling stations don’t provide the healthy, zero-sugar, low-cal, gluten-free, vegan snacks that girls like us require. To keep down the cals, when I’m feeling hungry I like to take in a big breath of air.

What to pack
Loads and loads of tampons! On the road, it’s hard to keep track of what day it is. You never know when Aunt Flow is coming to town. Our van is stocked with supersized tampons and jumbo pads, just in case Flow shows up uninvited with hefty suitcases.

How to get your beauty sleep
Make sure to pack plenty of earplugs and eye pillows. With these two key items, you can sleep wherever you want, whenever you want. Never resist the urge to fall asleep, no matter the situation. If you’re feeling tired at a show, take a nap in the back corner of a venue: anything to prevent those nasty bags under your eyes.

How to deal with fans
Avoid eye contact, especially with fanboys. Engaging with fans even the slightest bit gives them a false sense that you are on their level. You are NOT on their level. Fans are untamed animals. You have to teach them that you are completely superior if you expect them to idolise you. Unless they’re hot, actually. In which case, definitely go talk to them.

The band are about to embark on a US tour with Courtney Barnett, before headlining eight UK shows in October.

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Indie rockers Chastity Belt are fans of dark humor, and know just when to use it to their advantage. Case in point their new single “Joke”. Chastity Belt is not the kind of band to shy away from making a statement. Back in 2010, Julia Shapiro, Gretchen Grimm, Lydia Lund, and Annie Truscott formed the band in Walla Walla, Washington, and they’ve since relocated to Seattle where they’re part of the city’s thriving music scene. They sing about feeling antisocial in a place with a reputation for social freeze,” chips and dip, and nip-slips—among other delights. One of their publicity shots ranked number one on a list of the most painfully awkward band photos,” and they’ve earned a reputation for their tongue-in-cheek approach to pretty much everything.

The band’s first album, No Regerts was a gently sardonic (and well reviewed) gem, and on March 23rd, Chastity Belt will release their second album Time to Go Home, on Hardly Art. Take a first listen to their new track, “Joke,”

“Let’s light everything on fire,” singer Julia Shapiro utters matter-of-factly, plotting a perfectly sardonic escape plan for when life gets to be too much to handle. Later on the track (arguably the best off the forthcoming Time To Go Home LP), Chastity Belt’s strategy is put into motion, as the Seattle natives fade away into a blaze of dreamy and meandering guitars,