Posts Tagged ‘Shore’

Image may contain: plant, grass, tree, outdoor and nature, text that says 'FLEET FOXES SHORE'

Fleet Foxes have shared a new video for “I’m Not My Season” off their latest album “Shore”, which was released digitally last fall via Anti-Records and will be released on all physical formats on February 5th, 2021.

Shot at St. Ann & the Holy Trinity Church in Brooklyn, NY, the performance was filmed as part of ‘A Very Lonely Solstice Livestream’ in December 2020 and the video was directed by longtime Fleet Foxes collaborator and frontman Robin Pecknold’s brother Sean Pecknold.

Fleet Foxes’ Robin Pecknold will commemorate the release of Shore on vinyl & CD at independent record stores with a virtual in-store performance, streaming on Wednesday, February 10th at 6pm PT / 9pm ET. Fans can get access to the mini solo set by pre-ordering the album now at their local indie retailer, or by purchasing ‘Shore’ in the store or curbside on the weekend of its release, ‘Shore’ is available on an exclusive crystal clear 2LP vinyl set at independent record stores only. A limited edition Fleet Foxes art print is also available by Bailey Elder. 

Praised by critics upon release, “Shore” topped year-end lists placing on numerous lists including The New Yorker, NPR, Pitchfork, USA Today, Stereogum, Rolling Stone, and more stateside.

Image may contain: 2 people, outdoor

Perhaps no song on Fleet Foxes’s excellent 4th LP, “Shore”, illustrates the album’s concept of celebrating life amid our inner demons’ best attempts to thwart it quite like “Can I Believe You.” Singer Robin Pecknold literally talks to his mind about the struggle to communicate with his own thoughts, impulses and anxieties and in vintage Fleet Foxes fashion, that conversation is washed in bucolic beauty. On an album that Pecknold produced on his own throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, he found incredible ways to involve his band and collaborators. On “Can I Believe You,” it’s an edited megamix chorus of 500 fans on Instagram who sent clips to Pecknold of them singing the hymnal. It’s a gorgeous and thoughtful representation of how strange, but still magnificent, making music in 2020 can be.

Fleet Foxes released their fourth album, “Shore”, on the Autumnal Equinox. With this in mind, it’s hard not to hear it as a perfect fall companion, and especially the fall 2020 companion. It’s music that’s vibrant and full of life in a climate that has been harsh and dreary and full of let-downs. Robin Pecknold’s vocals are strong and hopeful, opening up a new blue sky for the days to come. The band has grown a lot through their career, and Shore reads like they’ve brushed off the unnecessary bits that might have held on from past albums, resulting in tracks are strong from beginning to end. “A Long Way Past The Past” shines as a standout track, carrying through Pecknold’s Laurel Canyon folk-inspired harmonies and beautifully blended guitar and horns. As Pecknold sings, “And oh man, was it that much better then? We were left alone, we were proud of our pain,” he has a moment of reflection—what seems so hard now might not feel so bad later. 

“Can I Believe You” by Fleet Foxes from the album ‘Shore’, available now

Image may contain: plant, grass, tree, outdoor and nature, text that says 'FLEET FOXES SHORE'

Fleet Foxes have annouced the release of their surprise new album titled ‘Shore’.  The album news was shared today (September 22nd) to mark the beginning of the autumnal equinox. It was first teased with posters displayed around Paris at the weekend. ‘Shore’ follows the band’s 2017 album ‘Crack-Up’, and was recorded in New York, Paris, Hudson, Los Angeles and Long Island City between September 2018 and September 2020. The band’s fourth record features contributions from Uwade Akhere, Hamilton Leithauser, Grizzly Bear’s Chris Bear and Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, and others

“I see “Shore” as a place of safety on the edge of something uncertain, staring at Whitman’s waves reciting ‘death’,” frontman Robin Pecknold said of the new album in a statement. “Tempted by the adventure of the unknown at the same time you are relishing the comfort of the stable ground beneath you. This was the mindset I found, the fuel I found, for making this album.”

The album comes complete with an accompanying film, also entitled Shore. It was shot in Washington, Oregon and Idaho on 16mm film by Kersti Jan Werdal. “I listened to the album while driving, and observationally shot landscapes that I felt resonated with the music, yet also stood on their own,” Werdal explained.

“The film is intended to co-exist and engage with the album, rather than be in a direct and symbiotic relationship with it. The urban and narrative scenes interact with the more surreal landscapes, rather than sit in opposition of one another. My hope is that the film, much like the album does, reflects optimism and strength.”

Speaking of the new album, Pecknold added: “Since the unexpected success of the first Fleet Foxes album over a decade ago, I have spent more time than I’m happy to admit in a state of constant worry and anxiety. Worried about what I should make, how it will be received, worried about the moves of other artists, my place amongst them, worried about my singing voice and mental health on long tours. I’ve never let myself enjoy this process as much as I could, or as much as I should. “By February 2020, I was again consumed with worry and anxiety over this
album and how I would finish it. But since March, with a pandemic spiralling out of control, living in a failed state, watching and participating in a rash of protests and marches against systemic injustice, most of my anxiety around the album disappeared. It just came to seem so small in comparison to what we were all experiencing together.

“In its place came a gratitude, a joy at having the time and resources to devote to making sound, and a different perspective on how important or not this music was in the grand
scheme of things. Music is both the most inessential and the most essential thing. We don’t need music to live, but I couldn’t imagine life without it. It became a great gift to no longer carry any worry or anxiety around the album, in light of everything that is going on.”

Fleet Foxes’ last album, 2017’s ‘Crack-Up’, was given the four-star album review, writing: “Some may be unconvinced by the ambitious leap Fleet Foxes have made on album three, but there’s really no doubting the first-rate intelligence behind this uncompromising and ever-changing piece of work.” Pecknold:  I wanted to make an album that celebrated life in the face of death, honouring our lost musical heroes explicitly in the lyrics and carrying them with me musically, committing to living fully and vibrantly in a way they no longer can, in a way they maybe couldn’t even when they were with us, despite the joy they brought to so many. I wanted to make an album that felt like a relief, like your toes finally touching sand after being caught in a rip current. I wanted the album to exist in a liminal space outside of time, inhabiting both the future and the past, accessing something spiritual or personal that is untouchable by whatever the state of the world may be at a given moment, whatever our season. I see “shore” as a place of safety on the edge of something uncertain, staring at Whitman’s waves reciting “death,” tempted by the adventure of the unknown at the same time you are relishing the comfort of the stable ground beneath you. This was the mindset I found, the fuel I found, for making this album.

Elsewhere in the statement, Pecknold wrote that, next year, the band will release nine more songs, “co-written from the ground up with [Fleet Foxes members] Morgan Henderson, Skyler Skjelset, Casey Wescott, and Christian Wargo.”

Fleet Foxes are to release their fourth studio album “Shore” . The bright and hopeful album, released via Anti-Records, for a February 5th street date. In addition to the album, a 16 mm road movie of the same name by Kersti Jan Werdal that showcases the landscapes of the Pacific Northwest.