Posts Tagged ‘Sam Genders’

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Tunng have released a new album, “Dead Club”, it came out on November 6th via Full Time Hobby. It’s a concept album about death and grief that’s also tied to a podcast of the same name. The album’s third and final single, “Scared to Death.” They also also shared episode 7 of the podcast, which features Swiss-born British philosopher and author Alain de Botton (listen to that here).

Tunng’s Sam Genders had this to say about “Scared to Death” in a press release:

“It’s inspired by my relationship to life, death, fear and acceptance and how my relationship to those four things has shifted in recent years, and especially since we began this project. On one hand I’m hugely drawn to rational thought and scientific knowledge as a way to solve problems and navigate life. On the other hand, I only seem to make real progress when I accept how little I know and really embrace that unknowing. “Maybe the unknowing helps me deal with life’s contradictions? “I’m unafraid of being dead but afraid to die.

“Life scares the crap out of me and yet I love life so much.

“Trying to make intellectual sense of the huge range of positive and negative feelings I have about life and death doesn’t always seem possible. Accepting the flow of experience however, without trying to understand it, does sometimes seem to work for me and make it all more manageable.” 

Tunng Presents…Dead Club Here’s what songwriter Sam Genders wrote about the track: It’s a song about how, by challenging taboos, we might arrive at a place closer to the truth and find ourselves better able to support each other as a result Whilst researching this project I’ve been struck by just how much of a taboo the subject of death is in our culture. Partly because of the ways in which people have responded when I explained what we were working on. One person was seriously worried I might be suicidal, and others clearly felt it was an odd thing to explore. Partly because of my own reactions. I often found myself nervous when talking about death or grief, or reaching for a socially acceptable way of phrasing an idea and struggling to find one. And yet, once the awkwardness has passed, I’ve also found that people are often eager to talk about how death and grief have affected their lives. Sometimes as if they’d be waiting far too long for the opportunity to unburden themselves. Interestingly I feel that in many modern settings people are more comfortable taking about sex than death.

We’ve journeyed so far in the last 60 years when it comes to talking about sex and I think you can make a very good case for that being a good thing. I expect the average person knows more about avoiding STIs or unwanted pregnancy, and is more likely to be comfortable with the idea of sexual pleasure or their own sexuality than ever before. I’m sure a lot of good has come from that. Now it seems like people are beginning to talk about death more. Imagine if we were so comfortable talking about death that everyone in our culture had the skills to support people who are grieving or to plan for the end of life for themselves or a loved one. It seems like there’s so much to gain. Palliative care is one obvious example of how more knowledge and awareness might help people live better lives. The song was inspired in part by my conversation with palliative care physician and writer Kathryn Mannix and her wonderful book ‘With The End In Mind’. Lyrically the song has clearly been through the Tunng filter. I wrote the words with a fantastical, almost comic book quality in places but it’s not flippant. I think these are genuinely important ideas.”

Previously Tunng have shared the album’s first single, “A Million Colours,” accompanied by an animated video. Then they shared its second single, “Death is the New Sex,” .

Some musical partnerships are so strong, intuitive and natural that they almost can’t be separated due to the natural magnetism present in the relationship. One such tight knit songwriting family are Tunng, and their new album Songs You Make At Night reunites founding members Sam Genders and Mike Lindsay (fresh from his LUMP side project with Laura Marling) and the rest of the Tunng gang for the first time since 2007’s Good Arrows.

“We really wanted to do a Tunng record going back to the original line up,” Lindsay says. “there was a real magic in the early records that we all wanted to capture again in this one.”

Since forming in 2003 and over the course of five albums, Tunng are a group that have explored the boundaries between acoustic and electronic music, becoming synonymous with the folktronica genre before moving into territory that managed to both evade that label and continue to redefine it. Songs You Make At Night finds a group of people reconnecting with a previous collective state to bring out something new and forward-looking. “We’re all so different but each bring something essential, something Tunng to the party. Be that to the studio, to the stage, to the van, or to the pub. I think that the new songs Mike and Sam have crafted between them have brought out the best in all of us.” confirms singer Becky Jacobs.

Songs You Make At Night is also Tunng’s most electronic-leaning to date. Take lead single ABOP which brings the Moog right to your face, with a heavily swung frazzled 808 pigeon beat that builds into a magical folk pop feast.

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Songs You Make At Night’s tone, theme, lyrics, mood and characters exist in a fluctuating state between night and day (“I got very much into the idea of a dark underwater world suffused with pockets of light and beauty and some of the songs grew out of that.” says Sam Genders), the conscious and unconscious. Crepuscular in its nature, Lindsay explains the all-encompassing title. “I think it’s also important to stress the songs you make at night not, we make at night. Then the word “songs” can mean a multitude of things. It can mean songs, or dreams, pillow talk or actions and decisions, moves, and can be very personal… the thoughts that keep you awake at night.”

released August 24th, 2018

Tunng syman fth314 sleeve preview

Some musical partnerships are so strong, intuitive and natural that they almost can’t be separated due to the natural magnetism present in the relationship. One such tight knit songwriting family are Tunng, and their new album Songs You Make At Night reunites founding members Sam Genders and Mike Lindsay (fresh from his LUMP side project with Laura Marling) and the rest of the Tunng gang for the first time since 2007’s Good Arrows. “We really wanted to do a Tunng record going back to the original line up,” Lindsay says. “there was a real magic in the early records that we all wanted to capture again in this one.”

Since forming in 2003 and over the course of five albums, Tunng are a group that have explored the boundaries between acoustic and electronic music, becoming synonymous with the folktronica genre before moving into territory that managed to both evade that label and continue to redefine it. Songs You Make At Night finds a group of people reconnecting with a previous collective state to bring out something new and forward-looking. “We’re all so different but each bring something essential, something Tunng to the party. Be that to the studio, to the stage, to the van, or to the pub. I think that the new songs Mike and Sam have crafted between them have brought out the best in all of us.” confirms singer Becky Jacobs.

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Taken from the forthcoming album “Songs You Make at Night” out 24th August 2018.