Posts Tagged ‘Russian’

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Russian shoegaze band Pinkshinyultrablast were apparently finishing up their third album — the follow-up to 2016’s “Grandfeathered” — when they released “Find Your Saint” a couple months ago. It’s unclear if they’re officially done with it by now, but either way the band has shared a new song to tide us over. The gorgeous “In The Hanging Gardens” finds the group leaning more into gauzy synths than before, but losing none of their epic sweep.

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Grandfeathered

The St. Petersburg five-piece created something of a stir with their debut album Everything Else Matters in early 2015 and the interest in the release stemmed from more than the fact that nobody had heard a Russian shoegaze band before. Despite its obvious influences, there was a depth to the music that implied Pinkshinyultrablast were a band who weren’t afraid to take a step into the unknown and push at a few boundaries. Their new album “Grandfeathered” shows this indeed to be the case as it is more experimental and powerful than its predecessor, managing to be both exhilarating and captivating. Opener ‘Initial’ begins with a long drawn out single note that gives no hint at the multi-layered gem to come, the song throbbing like a dub remix whilst overlayered in Cocteau Twins’ shimmering vocals. ‘Glow Vastly’ follows in the same pattern, the vocals here just managing to keep to the surface while a heavily distorted barrage of guitars and drums attempts to submerge them, the whole occasionally infiltrated by light bursts of melody that tantalise briefly before disappearing into the depths. ‘I Catch You Napping’ flies backwards and forwards between pop serenity and frenzied distortion and is quite excellent, while ‘Kiddy Pool Dream’ opens to a squeal of feedback and embraces MBV noisescaping, something also witnessed in the crushing ‘Comet Marbles’ and ‘Mölkky’. The single ‘The Cherry Pit’ is also a headrush of contrasting forces, while the closing title track moves between tempos with uncommon grace. From a band who had found themselves embraced by supporters of a very precise genre, this is a brave album, a potent blend of force and fancy. All credit to Pinkshinyultrablast for stepping out of the comfort zone to deliver such a fiercely charged offering and all the more credit for producing one of such quality.

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The Russian Shoegazer band released this EP as far back as 2009  so with the new release of the single “Ravestar Supreme” at the end of this month and a superb debut album from late last year called “Everything Else Matters”  Ethereal female vocals hang over tribal beats and amazing blazing guitars in “Cocteau-esque” sonic haze.
This band is the only unit that gives The Joy Formidible a run for their money in the dreampop world.
“Blaster” is the highlight here. Everything is good on this early release. But nothing compares to whats coming next from this Russian band Favorite track: Blaster. 
Hands down one of the best ‘shoegaze bands to come across.  All 4 tracks on this E.P. are fantastic. I hope the forthcoming live shows can come close to this. I love ‘Ode to Godzilla’
pinkshiny

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Happy release day! This limited second pressing is selling fast:
Pinkshinyultrablast, are a  five-piece band from Saint-Petersburg in Russia, and set to release their debut album ‘Everything Else Matters’ in January 2015.

Hailing from a city more synonymous with the State Conservatory rather than a gang of shoegaze addicts, they’ve been compared to Lush. But this is no mere throwback tribute – due to their sharp, icy electronics and ability to subvert the genre, bringing something new to the table. They possess not only the spirit of late 80s/early 90s British bands like Ride, but also machine-made sounds of the same era from Sabres Of Paradise or Global Communication, not to mention wider vibrations like Cluster, Popul Vuh, Terry Riley and Philip Glass.

pinkshinyultrablast

Disdain for a stagnant scene can often be a driving force of creativity; the band say of St Petersburg that, “we realised the local indie scene was totally boring and wanted to play something radically different”. That vision has been realised – this is an album brimming with playful melody and finely-crafted songwriting. Imagine the scope of a Caribou record, fronted by Elizabeth Fraser , The band take their name from an Astrobrite album, an act who were, according to the band, instrumental in how they “researched spaces between ambient, heavy guitar and pop music” .The spaces are what stand out, the production creates a dream-like affair, while space to breathe and reflect on the beauty of the music is accommodated. There is a sparseness to the album that in turn gives spaciousness, even expansiveness.