Posts Tagged ‘Romy Vager’

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Melbourne’s RVG return with their highly anticipated second album, “Feral”.

Following their beloved 2017 debut ‘A Quality of Mercy’RVG perform the tricky alchemy of combining rock’s urgency, punk’s anarchy, and pop’s empathy to create a record that feels vital: Feral is a catharsis, a call to arms, and a forthright indictment of contemporary complacency. ‘Feral’ was recorded at Head Gap studios with producer Victor Van Vugt (PJ Harvey, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Beth Orton).

Internationally renowned, Van Vugt currently resides in Berlin, Germany and travelled to Melbourne to work with RVG. One of the producer’s key tenets is a sense of spontaneity, of capturing the essence of a song’s live performance, a concern that RVG prize above all else when recording, RVG return with new single “I Used To Love You” from their highly anticipated second album. RVG perform the tricky alchemy of combining rock’s urgency, punk’s anarchy, and pop’s empathy. A goodbye that’s devasting in its simplicity, ‘I Used to Love You’ is shattering, potent and powerful. Simple and sincere, the track breathes through the pain. “There’s a lot of power in reclaiming yourself but also a lot of sadness. I adore Tom’s video and feel like it captures the energy of the song perfectly.” Romy explains.

The band recorded the album’s instrumentals live to track, allowing their playing to be infused with the kind of electricity that has seen the band’s live show lauded across Australia and internationally.

‘Feral’ is RVG’s first full-length release in three years and marks the beginning of an exhilarating new era for the band. Both a cry for help and a call to action, this is an album that demands your attention.

RVG is Romy Vager, Reuben Bloxham and Marc Nolte.

From RVG’s new album ‘Feral’ (out 24 April 2020),

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Australian rockers RVG shared a cover of John Cale’s “Dying on the Vine,” which served as the b-side to their single “Alexandra.” “Dying on the Vine” is taken from Cale’s 1985 album Artificial Intelligence. RVG take Cale’s strange, synth-laden original and give it a healthy dose of surfy guitars. Frontwoman Romy Vager bares her whole heart with this vocal performance as sorrow drips out of every nook and cranny of her voice. RVG’s guitars are just as poignant as Vager’s rough rock warble—they twinkle with a bittersweet glow. 

RVG

A Quality of Mercy is the debut album from Melbourne band RVG—an acronym for “Romy Vager Group,” honoring namesake singer-songwriter, Romy Vager. The album was self-released quietly in early 2017, and is full of songs that are imaginative, passionate, and witty. Sometimes they’re sad and raw, too. But at their core, all of the songs—which are inspired by bands like Echo and The Bunnymen and The Go-Betweens. The LP is an eight-track collection of tight, incisive post-punk/retro-pop infused with a liberal dose of downcast catharsis, confessional lyrics and downright infectious hooks.

The roots of the music on A Quality of Mercy began taking shape when Vager moved to Melbourne from the South Australian city of Adelaide in 2004. She was 17 at the time, and she hadn’t come out as transgender yet.

“I’d just started dating someone, a friend from high school, and I said to them, ‘Do you want to move to Melbourne?’ And a week later, we were in Melbourne. I spent probably five years after that just trying to keep afloat, in varying degrees of poverty.

While A Quality of Mercy touches on the challenges of being trans, Vager says it’s not a strong theme as much as “an underlying current. A lot of the songs were about re-evaluating things and moving things about.” She refers to a line in Rowland S. Howard’s 1999 song “Dead Radio”: “‘What to ignite and what to extinguish’—I had that running through my head,” she says. All the songs are striking in their own way, and Vager certainly hadn’t anticipated their positive reception.

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