Posts Tagged ‘Rachel Goswell’

The soft cavalry 01

The Soft Cavalry are a new duo featuring Rachel Goswell of legendary ’90s shoegazers Slowdive alongside her husband Steve Clarke. They are releasing their self-titled debut album on July 5th via Bella Union Records. This week they shared another song from the album, “Bulletproof,” via a video for the track. The striking black & white video features the band performing the song via sign language.

Goswell had this to say about the video in a press release: “For a long time now I have wanted to do a video that incorporates BSL (British Sign Language) due to my son being Profoundly Deaf with no hearing. He also has additional needs with CHARGE Syndrome that brings many added complications. I live within two worlds both Hearing and Deaf; and have learned a lot in the last nine years about the many barriers Deaf people can face in our society. One of the main points I was taught very quickly is how music is accessible to Deaf people. Of course music can be felt through vibration but visually I feel so much more could be done to enhance the experience. We made this video with the support of Sign Up BSL to translate ‘Bulletproof’ so that the song flows properly in BSL. Sometimes with signing videos – they can be a literal translation of the words (Sign Supported English) which will make little sense to the Deaf viewer. Our hope is that we have achieved this and also that one day as my son gets older and develops his language skills he will be able to understand this song.”

Previously they shared its first single, “Dive,” Then they have shared a video for “Dive.” Hand Held Cine Club directed the video, which fittingly featured a man contemplating taking a high dive into a public swimming pool.

Of the theme of the album, Clarke says: “It’s recovery versus new doubt. I’m there, in the middle. The word that kept coming back to me was ‘resilience.’ With the right mentality and people around you, especially family, we get through, and find a level of hope.”

Clarke’s brother Michael Clarke produced the album, which also features keyboardist Jesse Chandler (Mercury Rev, Midlake), guitarist Tom Livermore, and drummer Stuart Wilkinson.

Slowdive released a new album, a self-titled affair and their first full-length in 22 years, in 2017 via Dead Oceans.

Clarke has been a musician since the late ’90s, playing bass and singing backup vocals with various bands live and in the studio. But The Soft Cavalry is the first album he’s been in creative control of. He’s also been a tour manager, which is how he met Goswell, managing one of Slowdive’s reunion tours in 2014. He had been divorced since 2011 when he met her.

In a press release Clarke sets the scene for when he first met Goswell: “I was hung-over in the back of my van trying to work out how I was going to fit all the band’s gear into this confined space whilst I still had all of mine from the show that I’d played in London the night before. The second of two sold-out shows at Hammersmith Apollo with David Brent!”

A year later, Clarke and Goswell were living together. They got married in 2018. In the press release Clarke says that Goswell inspired him to focus more on his own music.

“I’d always had ideas but never felt that anything I had to say was worthy of anyone’s attention, let alone my own,” he says. “I wish that I could have done this 15 years ago but, in reality, I simply couldn’t have. But I’m not one to overly wallow. I’d rather plough the various levels of confusion into songs.”.

Advertisements

The Soft Cavalry - The Soft Cavalry

Slowdive’s Rachel Goswell has lent her talents to a number of projects over the last few years, from the supergroup Minor Victories to collaborations with Mark Kozelek and Beach Fossils. She also, of course, played a large part in Slowdive’s 2017 comeback album. The band’s music is a particularly British brand of intense cinematic drama. Melodic and timeless, the album lands in the atmospheric dimensions between Pink Floyd, Talk Talk and Mansun. A record radiating midlife crisis but equally enormous elation; a helix of fear and hope, aching for resolution. A record Steve emphasises that he “needed” to make.

Today, she’s announcing a new project named the Soft Cavalry, which is a duo with her husband Steve Clarke, who she married last year. In July, they’ll release their self-titled debut album. “I’d always had ideas but never felt that anything I had to say was worthy of anyone’s attention, let alone my own,” Clarke said of the collaboration. “I wish that I could have done this fifteen years ago but, in reality, I simply couldn’t have. But I’m not one to overly wallow. I’d rather plough the various levels of confusion into songs.”

Its lead single, “Dive,” is a contemplative sigh, unknotting thorny emotions with comparative ease.

Taken from the debut album by ‘The Soft Calvary’.

We are incredibly pleased to announce a special, one-off reissue of Mojave 3’s debut album, “Ask Me Tomorrow‘’, its limited to just 500 copies, pressed on seafoam green vinyl and with Vaughan Oliver and Chris Bigg’s artwork beautifully repurposed in a shiny gold mirror board sleeve.

‘Ask Me Tomorrow’ has been unavailable on vinyl since its release on 4AD in October, 1995 and original copies now change hands for three-figure sums. The reissue is timely as it follows the recent announcement of Slowdive’s fourth album, and this could well have been that record, but after being dropped by Creation following the release of ‘Pygmalion’, the band – reduced to a three-piece of Neil Halstead, Rachel Goswell and Ian McCutcheon – rechristened themselves Mojave 3 and experimented with stripped-down, acoustic songs, As a result, ‘Ask Me Tomorrow’ is essentially Slowdive Unplugged; It’s a very special record, with a unique, hushed grandeur all of its own.

‘Ask Me Tomorrow’ is actually an album of demos. Neil Halstead had started recording at his flat above a carpet shop on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Lancaster Road in west London – the very same place in which he conceived much of ‘Pygmalion’, which was inspired by his housemates Darren Seymour of Seefeel and Mark Van Hoen, who recorded electronica as Locust and Autocreation.

“I just wanted to try some songs, because ‘Pygmalion’ was so abstract,” explains Neil of this musical about-turn. “I wasn’t writing for a record at that point, just messing round on an acoustic and listening to a lot of Leonard Cohen and Nick Drake, Townes Van Zandt, Gram Parsons… This was even while ‘Pygmalion’ was being made, almost as a way to relax and change worlds.”

“I remember recording the vocals for ‘Love Songs On The Radio’ at Neil’s flat,” says Rachel Goswell. “We were also lucky to still have a publishing deal with EMI, so we were able to utilise their studio in central London for recording, too.”

Joined by Christopher Andrews on piano, they recorded a further three songs, live, during a one-day session. “We couldn’t separate the instruments, drums and vocals because the studio was so small,” explains Neil. “I think that’s why there is a lot of reverb over the tracks – everything bleeds into everything else. The only way to mix it was to push the room mics up and push the vocals up.”

With six songs completed they made some demo tapes, still marked with the name Slowdive, one of which was sent to Ivo Watts-Russell at 4AD, who initially ignored it for a couple weeks. “I thought, if they’d been dropped and 4AD wasn’t having a blazing success with anything, then what could we do that Creation couldn’t?” Ivo tells writer Martin Aston in his definitive 4AD history, ‘Facing The Other Way’. “But once I played the tape, I instantly adored it.” He wanted them to follow in the footsteps of the Red House Painters and make their demo their debut album.

However, Neil had since gone travelling in the Middle East, spending time in Jordan, Egypt and Israel: “I remember calling Rachel to check in and she said Ivo had heard the demo and loved it and that I should come back so we could record a few more tunes and put an album out on 4AD.”

On his return, they recorded three further songs in south London’s Blackwing Studios, with the assistance of former Chapterhouse guitarist (and future full-time Mojave member) Simon Rowe and, almost without trying, an album was complete.

“The thing I remember about working on ‘Ask Me Tomorrow’ is that the recordings came together pretty quickly and it all seemed so effortless,” says drummer Ian McCutcheon. “It was a really positive time, the complete antithesis to the final months of the Creation era.”

“I didn’t dream for a moment we would get picked up so quickly by another label and for it to be 4AD was just amazing,” reveals Rachel. “Creation to 4AD – the two greatest indie labels at that time.”

“The band name came while we were mastering the record,” explains Neil. “A friend of ours was at Abbey Road with us that day and 4AD were asking what we wanted to call the new project. She suggested Mojave because she thought the music had a wide-open, desert quality and so we thought, ‘Oh, maybe that could work…’ Of course, in true Spinal Tap tradition there was already a German band called Mojave, so we added the ‘3’ as we were a three-piece. That sort of became redundant later when we were six!”

But three was the magic number and, on October 16th, 1995 – just 252 days after Slowdive’s swansong was released – the metamorphosis was complete and Mojave 3 were born. What happened next? Well, just ask me tomorrow…

MOJAVE_3_ASK+ME+TOMORROW-497587

Image may contain: indoor

The remarkable thing about the Minor Victories self-titled debut album isn’t just the astonishing quality of the music produced but also the fact that the band members, as the sleeve notes point out – ‘never shared the same air.‘ Meaning that the album was created ‘remotely’ – ” by swapping ideas, songs, fragments and finished recordings via broadband connections.”  Given this way of working and the differing expectations ( ‘we probably didn’t start off with the same vision’ ) over what this collaboration should yield, the resultant album is a majestic, life-affirming triumph. ”

http://

Minor Victories, which features Rachel Goswell from Slowdive, Stuart Braithwaite of Mogwai, and Justin Lockey of Editors (and his brother James), released their debut album over the summer — the kind of soaring, textural (electronic-tinged) rock you might expect from such a wonderful collaboration.

minor victories

Minor Victories are:

Justin Lockey
James Lockey
Stuart Braithwaite
Rachel Goswell

101467

Eponymous debut album from Minor Victories, a brand new musical collaboration formed by Stuart Braithwaite (Mogwai), Rachel Goswell (Slowdive), Justin Lockey of Editors, and his brother James. The freedom, the immediacy, the swapping of ideas and incredibly, the fact that all four members have barely spent any time together recording or writing only adds to the heart of the project. Minor Victories unveils the real essence of what a group of talented individuals unshackled by convention can attain. Contributions feature a spectrum of musical tastes that converge from various parts of the UK and US unveiling something beyond the original vision of any of the contributors that pushes new boundaries and new sounds into hitherto uncharted waters that are merely the first steps into the musical world of Minor Victories.

The Editors have a  new album and have previewed the track  “Life Is A Fear” The video. Conceived, directed and edited by Rahi Rezvani. Taken from new album titled ‘IN DREAM’ to be released October 2nd: Tom Smith commented our new record is called In Dream, it’s out in October. Our last record was the sound of us learning to walk again, with new legs! In Dream, our first self produced album, is us diving into the computer, a real studio record, made in isolation by the 5 of us. Can’t wait for you all to hear it

http://

Editors frontman Tom Smith, the driving concept for his band’s forthcoming album, In Dream is to make a record that reflects his acts inclinations toward the disparate worlds of “both pop and experimental.” Today they’re sharing a brand new track, “The Law,” which accomplishes that goal by prudently enlisting Slowdives  legendary vocalist, Rachel Goswell as an airy complement to the track’s earthbound instrumentation.

Smith says that this new track is “as close to ‘I Got You Babe’ as [they] are ever gonna get,” which seems absurd when you hear the track immediately initiate shrill, deformed steel drums, and then the unvarnished truth when you begin to understand the call-and-response tenderness between Smith and Goswell’s vocals. The harsh, almost no-wave synth lines and percussion transition easily into a deep, but scratchy bass line. That throatiness is matched by Smith’s deep brooding questions: “What are you drinking/Can I get some?” Smith’s miserable character is then saved by Goswell’s signature dream-pop hush which advises him not to “let it get heavy.”

 

Slowdive have just reformed with their original members to play some shows and particular at the Primavera festival in Barcelona Spain,
http://www.slowdiveofficial.com