Posts Tagged ‘Pip Blom’

pip blom debut album boat 2019

Promising young indie rocker’s Pip Blom are looking to break beyond the canals of their Amsterdam hometown with new album “Boat”. Due out through Heavenly Recordings. “Boat”  was first recorded by Dave McCracken at Big Jelly Studios in Margate on England’s southeast coast. It was then mixed by Dillip Harris in — of all places — a shipping container that sat along the banks of the Thames in East London.

Based on the title and various studio locations, Blom clearly has a fascination with water and travel. But it turns out those themes were already on her mind well before she and her band even began working on their debut LP. “Before we had even made the album I decided that I wanted to call it Boat. I envisioned a really big cruise ship in the 10,000-times bigger ocean. When I think of boats I think of journeys, traveling, going somewhere and having a goal. And I think that that has been what the last couple of years have been for us.”

The bouncy lead single, “Daddy Issues”, and its music video, a “love letter to classic cinema.” Blom broke Boat down Track by Track.

“Daddy Issues”:
We decided to play this song for the second time when we had to play a pretty important gig in London. We had already played it the day before in Manchester, and our managers weren’t the biggest fans. They said, “Are you sure you want to play it in London too?” We were very stubborn and said, “Yes, we are going to make it work.” When we finished the gig, our managers ran up to us and said, “This is such a good song, you guys were right, think it’s definitely a single.” And look where we are now!

“Don’t Make It Difficult”:
There are a few songs on this record that have demo parts in them. Me, Dave and Dilip agreed on the fact that sometimes there’s no point in trying to beat a demo part. The bridge guitar that goes round and round in your ears is the perfect example of that. We tried to record a different one in the studio, but it wasn’t close to this one. I feel quite proud that we’ve used parts that I recorded at home with a crappy amp and a mic hanging from a duct-tape thread. It gives an extra personal touch to the record that means a lot to me.

“Say It”:
We recorded the album in two legs. “Say It” was saved for the last leg. We thought it wouldn’t be too difficult to play that one, but because of all the changes in dynamics and parts it was a hard song to record live. It took more time than expected, but I think we captured the energy from the studio perfectly. I really like the combination between the gentle and soft singing in the verses and the quiet though busy instruments that bring the singing to a next level.

“Tired”:
This song is the most straightforward song on the record if you ask me. When I started off writing songs I didn’t have a clue how many varieties you can have in terms of song structures. “Tired” is one of the oldest songs of the record and thus the most straightforward one. I am really happy that this one has made it to album because it represents us as musicians very well. It’s not about doing the most difficult things, it’s about the melody and the energy.

“Bedhead”:
This is the song we had the most discussions about. Gini is not a big fan of the drum computer. We tried multiple times to rehearse this song without it but it didn’t go anywhere. It sounded very weird and not cool. So after lots of conversations between us, the band, we asked Dave (the producer) what he thought. He immediately said that we should keep the drum computer in. We did, and I think it really works. I am very happy that we had a chance to step away from just the regular band vibes and add something to the album that’s not really common in the indie scene.

“Tinfoil”:
I really tried creating something different with this track. I don’t know a lot about different keys and tempos but I wanted to make song that’s in 3/4 instead of 4/4. I had never tried it before so it was quite the experiment. I always start off with guitar and drums. And after I came up with a guitar part that I liked, i decided I wanted this song to sound ominous and kind of sexy. The rest is history.

“Ruby”:
Al
and Mike were the technicians at the studio. One day Al was in and helped with recording “Ruby.” I was messing around a bit with my crappy Behringer delay pedal when Al turned around and said, “Wow, that’s really cool, you should use that.” Dave came running down the stairs and said, “Yes yes yes! Let’s record this.” We used it in the bridge and I think it really lifts up the entire part. It sounds weird, like aliens, but that’s what I like about it.

“Set of Stairs”:
When we started rehearsing the songs for recording, this was one of the songs that felt right immediately. Especially the verses are so full of energy. We recorded this one in the first leg. But when we went back home and had a listen to all rough edits, I wasn’t happy with the way I sang it. So the first thing we did when we returned to the studio was sing it again. It needed spice.

“Sorry”:
This song is my personal favorite. It was really hard to sing the chorus. I am not a trained singer and this was really high for me. After five takes of the high backings, my voice was completely gone. I loved recording those though; Dave and I were together in one room and his energy helped me so much to nail it in the end. When I wasn’t able to sing it in tune, he turned around with and said with his thick Scottish accent, “That’s awesome. We’re almost there.”

“Aha”:
This was a weird one. I always make demos and send them to everyone else. And when I make those demos, I usually stick to a maximum of two guitar parts because we’ve got two guitarists. I am not sure what happened to “Aha,” but the chorus in the demo had seven guitars playing different stuff. During the recording process we tried to stick to the same rule with just using two guitar parts. But “Aha was the exception. This one needed mayhem. And it’s there.

Blom and her band, called Pip Blom,

Exclusive: Pip Blom Share Eerie, Seaside "Ruby" Video

Dutch indie rocker Pip Blom and her band are preparing to release their debut album Boat, out on May 31 via Heavenly Recordings / PIAS. After a searing showing at SXSW last month (their first set of U.S. dates), the band have shared the video for “Ruby,” premiering exclusively at Paste.

After 2018’s solid Paycheck EP and recent single “Daddy Issues,” the 22 year-old singer/songwriter’s new song “Ruby” is another rapturous gem of post-punk adjacent indie rock. With clamoring guitars and vocals that range from sassy to melancholic to euphoric, “Ruby” embodies the ephemeral rush of joy you get from a gentle beachside breeze.

Set on the seaside, the music video captures Blom visiting a UFO hypnotherapist after catching a glimpse of something eerie. The video’s director Raymond van Mil said of the cryptic clip, “We made a few jumps in our imagination, and we were explicitly not trying to explain or illustrate the lyrics. We started with flamingos. Apparently there are two distinct families standing some 20 meters apart on one exact place in Zeeland/the Netherlands. We went there and were in amazement, it looked so alien in the Dutch landscape. From there the UFO story unfolded and was fun. Was it a dream? A memory? A documentary? Only Pip knows.”

Ruby, Video by Raymond Van Mill. Shot on analog film, Super 8 – Kodak Ektachrome / Kodak TriX

‘Ruby’ taken from ‘Boat’ LP out 31st May on Heavenly Records.

Pip Blom have shared a brand new video for their latest single ‘Daddy Issues’, directed by Edward Zorab.

“The video is a love letter to classic cinema, but also a cautionary tale,” says frontwoman Pip Blom. “Our culture makes it too easy to fall in love with things which aren’t real, and if you’re not careful you can end up in a sort of groundhog day cycle of self-induced disappointment. I think the surreal narrative of the video encapsulates that in quite a self aware way.”

‘Daddy Issues’ is the first single taken from Pip Blom’s upcoming album ‘Boat’

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‘Come Home’ is the second single off of Pip Blom’s brand new debut EP, PaycheckHailing from Amsterdam, the band is named after its 22-year-old guitarist, singer, and songwriter. This song totally nails that whole ‘effortless effort’ vibe heaps of singers aim for but most miss. The band just supported The Breeders on their European tour, so it looks like I’m not the only one picking up what they’re putting down. Watch this space! they wil be your next fav band.

“Come Home” appears on the ‘Paycheck’ EP (10″ vinyl) on Persona Non Grata Records. In stores November 9th, 2018.

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A strong contender for 2018’s fastest rising newcomer, it would be fair to say Amsterdam-native Pip Blom is having a very good year. Pip’s supported the likes of The Breeders & Franz Ferdinand, garnered radio plays and playlists from every station in the land, and generally made some utterly wonderful records.  As we all await the hotly anticipated debut album, Pip continues to tease with next months release of another EP, Paycheck.

This week Pip has shared the latest track from the EP, in the shape of Come Home. Quite possibly her darkest and most angular-release to date, the track builds around twangy-guitars and rumbling bass, before an almost Radiohead-like drum beat adds some winning propulsion. It’s a track that bristles with tension, Pip’s voice, fuzzy, at times engulfed in the music as she seems to dissect a failing relationship, “I’ve tried hard to keep a distance, not to get too much involved, think that you’re indecisive, I know I have had enough”. It’s a different Pip Blom, a darker, arguably less accessible version than we’ve heard on record before, and she sounds all the more intriguing for it.

Paycheck EPis out October 5th via Nice Swan Records

Image may contain: 2 people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments and guitar

Amsterdam-based Pip Blom has announced details of her new single, ‘Babies Are a Lie’, the first song on a AA single to be released via Nice Swan Records on 16th October.

Since first airing her angst-ridden brand of lo-fi indie last year, Pip Blom hasn’t been one to hang around. Four singles released in quick succession introduced her music to listeners far wider than her native Netherlands, with airplay across the likes of American radio station KCRW, BBC Radio One and 6 Music ensuring songs Pip had simply uploaded to the Internet hit hundreds of thousands of streams.

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Pip Blom is more than just an underground interest. The effortlessly catchy chorus, even dares to repeat the line, “don’t you want to get it out of my head”, as if something that hook-laden was even possible to shift. With UK dates coming up in October, we should probably get used to Pip Blom never standing still.