Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Ocean Blue’

Chewing is the solo project of Local Natives’ Nik Ewing. He has announced a new album where he covers Dennis Wilson’s 1977 classic “Pacific Ocean Blue” in its entirety as part of Turntable Kitchen’s Sounds Delicious Series. He has shared two tracks from it: “River Song” (which features the rest of Local Natives) bandmates and “Moonshine” (which features Cults). The album was released December 21st.

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Ewing had this to say about the album in a press release: “With zero hyperbole, driving across LA can take half an hour or four days. One of the more manageable times I drove across the city, it took me 37:15, the length of Pacific Ocean Blue by Dennis Wilson. Like many important first album listening experiences, the entire environment surrounding that listen burnt into my memory. It was like that sad, dark album was made specifically for that specific sad, dark drive across LA. A haunted, outcast Beach Boy who still sung simple Beach Boy lyrics like ‘I’m sorry, I miss you’ but whose weathered voice is painfully more honest without the hollow late ’70s shine from his band (who seemingly didn’t miss him that much).

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The first single from Chewing’s full album tribute to Dennis Wilson’s Pacific Ocean Blue featuring Local Natives.

“I really love when artists give their own radical take on a song (Jukebox by Cat Power is criminally underrated IMO). Luckily this album isn’t as ‘sacred’ as if I covered Pet Sounds in its entirety, which allowed me a lot more liberty. I wanted to re-imagine this album in a much darker and ambient context: to flow like a lost mixtape, to sound cohesive with all the voices (and trumpet, hi Nico!) weaving in and out throughout (and obviously I couldn’t NOT have my band contribute beautiful, lush harmonies to a Beach Boy cover album).”

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The 12th release in the SOUNDS DELICIOUS limited edition vinyl subscription series. Chewing featuring Local Natives, Cults, POP ETC, Evan Voytas, and Nico Segal reimagine and pay tribute to Dennis Wilson’s Pacific Ocean Blue by covering it in its entirety.

denis wilson

It was 31 years ago today, that the world lost Dennis Wilson. Dennis was the only member of The Beach Boys who was a surfer. To many, Dennis was the perfect example of the Southern California surfing lifestyle.
Dennis Wilson was the son of Audree Neva (née Korthof) and Murry Gage Wilson. He spent his family years with his brothers and parents in Hawthorne, California. Dennis’ role in the family dynamic, which he himself acknowledged, was that of the black sheep. Though anxiety-filled and aggressive at times, he was also sensitive and generous. Possessed with an abundance of physical energy and a combative nature, Dennis often refused to participate in family singalongs, and likewise avoided vocalizing on the early recordings that Brian made on a portable tape recorder, but Dennis would sing with his brothers late at night in their shared bedroom on a song, Brian later recalled as “our special one we’d sing,” titled “Come Down, Come Down from the Ivory Tower.”
Wilson released his debut solo album Pacific Ocean Blue in 1977. His collaborators on the album included Daryl Dragon (the ‘Captain’ of Captain & Tennille) and Gregg Jakobson. The album peaked at No. 96 in the U.S. and sold around 300,000 copies, matching that year’s Beach Boys album Love You. Pacific Ocean Blue performed well critically and continues to maintain a cult following. Wilson’s trademark gravelly and melancholy vocals resonate throughout the work. The expanded Sony Legacy edition was voted the 2008 Reissue of the Year in both Rolling Stone and Mojo magazines.Succeeding years saw Wilson battling alcohol abuse. Smoking had taken a toll on his voice, although the resultant gravelly effect helped define him as a singer. On December 28, 1983, shortly after his 39th birthday, Wilson drowned at Marina Del Rey, after drinking all day and diving in the afternoon to recover items he had thrown overboard at the marina from his yacht three years prior.

Dennis Wilson‘s body was buried at sea off the California coast (33°53.9′N 118°38.8′W) by the U.S. Coast Guard on January 4, 1984. His song “Farewell My Friend” was played at the funeral. As non-veterans of the Coast Guard and Navy are not allowed to be buried at sea unless cremated, Dennis’ burial was possible due to the intervention of President Reagan