Posts Tagged ‘Morton Valence’

“After three brilliant, criminally overlooked albums, Another Country might be Morton Valence’s masterpiece, the purest distillation of their gradual shift to an ‘urban country’ sound. Hacker’s lyrical take on the poetry of the city has rarely been better, his melodies never stronger, his and Anne Gilpin’s voices rarely so simpatico. From opener Chinatown, the greatest song Calexico never wrote, to the two-part prison drama of First Night/A Tear For Every Year to The Hawkline Discotheque – suburban angst set to an infectious disco beat – this album never lets up. The arrangements are magnificent, by turns heartbreakingly intimate or spaghetti western-epic, and the linking soundscapes evocative. Another Country is a total triumph and you need to hear it.” – from my Narc review

Taken from the album ‘Another Country’ out on the 6th April 2015 on Bastard Recordings

MORTON VALENCE – ” Clouds “

Posted: December 21, 2014 in MUSIC
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Maverick genius, Robert ‘Hacker’ Jessett and honeyed singer Anne Gilpin, Morton Valence is a five-piece London-based rock band that loosely pitches its music as ‘urban country.’ Left is Valence’s third album – all put out on its own marvellously titled Bastard Recordings label – and maintains the free spirited inventiveness it is rightly renowned for. With typical understatement, the band itself describes the album as ‘a bunch of recordings that had literally been left languishing in Morton Valence’s archives which we felt deserved to see the light of day.’ It is actually a surprisingly cohesive collection and worthy of a place in your collection

Fronted by maverick genius, Robert ‘Hacker’ Jessett and honeyed singer Anne Gilpin, Morton Valence is a five-piece London-based rock band that loosely pitches its music as ‘urban country.’  “Left” is Valence’s third album – all put out on its own marvellously titled Bastard Recordings label – and maintains the free spirited inventiveness it is rightly renowned for. With typical understatement, the band itself describes the album as ‘a bunch of recordings that had literally been left languishing in Morton Valence’s archives which we felt deserved to see the light of day.’ It is actually a surprisingly cohesive collection and worthy of a place in your collection. The opening track is the startling “The Day I Went To Bed For 10 Years.”