Posts Tagged ‘Lust For Life’

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This video features the tracks, Lust for Life and The Passenger, which are originally from the Iggy Pop album, “Lust for Life”. The album had been released about a month prior to the show, on the 29th of August. Most of the footage used here was shot for So it Goes; a British TV music show, presented by Factory Records founder, Tony Wilson on Granada Television between 1976 and 1977. So it Goes specialised in showcasing the punk rock scene of the day.

Manchester was the ninth date of the Lust for Life tour. The tour had started in Iggy’s then home city of Berlin on September the 12th and it would finish up two months later on the 18th of November at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. The musicians on the Lust for Life album had been The Idiot touring band of: Tony Sales – bass, Hunt Sales – drums, Ricky Gardiner – guitar, David Bowie – keyboard and backing vocals. Plus Carlos Alomar – guitar. However, by the time of the Lust for Life tour, Bowie and Gardner were gone, replaced by Bowie’s former lead guitarist from the Station to Station tour, Stacy Heydon, and multi-instrumentalist, Scott Thurston, on guitar, piano, synthesizer, harmonica.

Stacy Heydon, on how he came to be chosen for the Lust for Life tour “Iggy accompanied us throughout the Station to Station tour. He and Dave were best mates. I was approached by Jimmy. No doubt Dave gave his blessing”. Scott Thurston had already been a member of the 1973 – 74 live incarnation of The Stooges, and he had played on the Kill City material in 1975.

Stacy Heydon talking about the tour with Iggy: “The people in Manchester were among the best. Being mostly of English dissent I felt very much at home throughout the country. Jimmy was and is quite the entertainer. On countless occasions he would be sharing his extensive knowledge on things like French impressionists, psychology, various political systems, specific museum pieces and the like. Two steps later as soon as we’d taken the stage all bets were off. Being on tour with Mr Osterburg was not for the faint of heart but it did open my eyes to the immense wit and chameleon like qualities that he could extract from his psyche at will, and was the very fabric of his being. That said, whichever side of the cloth you happened to be with at any given time seemed to be the antithesis of the other. If it’s true that opposites attract, that little fucker must love himself as much as we all do!”

The material shot for So it Goes was shown on British TV about a month after the live show, on the 30th of October. Part of The Passenger was shown, a short interview with Iggy, and at the end of the show, part of Lust for Life, with credits played before the end of the song. Unfortunately, this broadcast led to the early demise of So it Goes. As John Cooper Clark states on his narration on “Anarchy in Manchester”, “Unfortunately for So it Goes, his (Iggy’s) noble onstage savagery led to the shows cancelation in late ’77. That FY appendage didn’t do it for Granada’s top brass.” And so the planned third series of So it Goes never happened.

A little extra material from the Iggy interview, and extra footage and different audio sources of the two songs from the live show have surfaced here and there. So as per my usual remit with these recreation videos, from the 10+ sources I could find, I have compiled all the best quality bits and pieces into one hopefully fluid and enjoyable whole. I could somewhat complete the two live performances. However no footage could be found for the first minute and a half of Lust for Life, so I used footage from another European date on the tour (possibly Amsterdam). It’s not a perfect match – Iggy is wearing different clothing and the venue and audience are obviously different, but better than a blank screen or omitting a large chuck of the track, I think. Frustratingly, in the multiple TV sets that are the backdrop to Tony Wilson’s intro, we see more footage from the show and two other Iggy interviews! What happened to that material?!

The amazing cover shot of Iggy leering into a Granada Televison camera was taken at the Manchester show by Kevin Cummings.

I am grateful to Easy Action for providing audio tracks and allowing me to use them on this video. The Manchester audio performances of Lust for Life and The Passenger are available to buy from Easy Action, as downloads and a limited edition 10” vinyl that has just been released this weekend.

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Lana del Rey has premiered the official music video for her latest single “White Mustang”. The video came out today and now her global fans can watch it on the internet.

The single “White Mustang” is taken from Lana’s fifth studio album “Lust For Life”. The single is co-written by Rick Nowels and Lana so you can expect some fire lyrics. In the opening verse, Lana is talking about packing her stuff and getting ready for the summer but he never called even though he took her number. Despite that, Lana likes her boy. Now with that kind of start to a song, I expect a lot of good things coming up in the remaining lyrics. I hope you’d enjoy how Lana has picturized this song. This video is just a killer.

In the music video, you will see Lana showing her killer looks on-screen. I absolutely adore how beautiful she looks and how she changes her emotion based on what she is singing in the song. You will see her dancing in the slow motion in the video.

Iggy Pop’s ‘Lust For Life’: 10 Things You Didn’t Know

It was love at first drum. You can’t mention Iggy Pop’s “Lust For Life” without mentioning the hypnotic infectious drumbeat that kicks off the title cut with a bang. The lyrics are some of Iggy’s best. “I’m worth a million in prizes” is one of the greatest lines in rock. When the third verse comes in, the listener knows all the words and what they don’t…they’ll make up. Lust For Life is often considered the best post-Stooges Iggy Pop album, it is the 40th anniversary of Iggy’s explosive solo album.

Iggy’s first three solo releases all came out in the same year – 1977. Lust For Life came out on the heels of Iggy’s first post-Stooges release, The Idiot. The album was a collaborative effort with David Bowie (who had previously mixed The Stooges last album, Raw Power) and was heavily influenced by German culture, as both musicians were living in Berlin at the time. The band went on tour and shortly after, they jumped into the studio to write and record. On tour, they’d been playing The Idiot and old Stooges cuts but during sound checks, the band started experimenting with ideas.

Recording for Lust for Life started in April and ended in June, with the album hitting the shelves on 9th September 1977. Not even half a year had passed since the release of The Idiot and there was a new rock n’ roll record from Iggy. During this time, Iggy had also made a third album, Kill City, a demo he recorded in 1975 but most labels were hesitant, due to Pop’s reputation at the time. After the success of Lust For Life, the smaller label Bomp! Records jumped at the chance to put it out in November of 1977.

While The Idiot sounds more atmospheric and experimental for Iggy, Lust for Life sees him return to straightforward rock’n’roll. In the studio, Bowie would sit at a piano and name famous rock songs and say, “Okay now we’re going to rewrite [insert song]” and knock it out while Iggy would record it. While Bowie co-wrote many of the tracks, it’s Iggy’s lyrical wit and musicality that truly shines, along with an excellent lean and mean backing band provided by brothers Tony and Hunt Sales for the rhythm section, Carlos Alomar and Ricky Gardiner on guitars and Bowie on keyboard and backing vocals.

The infectious riff on the title cut, ‘Lust for Life’ was inspired by the Morse code opening to the American Forces Network News in Berlin while David and Iggy were waiting for 70s buddy cop series Starsky and Hutch to start. Whereas the song’s lyrics heavily reference all the stripteases, drugs, and hypnotizing chickens that make up Beat novelist William S Burroughs’ book, The Ticket That Exploded.

Iggy has always been a less-is-more kind of songwriter, so when it came to his lyrics, he took direction from the kid’s show host, Soupy Sales, who instructed kids to write fan letters that were 25 words or less. Bowie was so impressed by the expediency of Iggy’s improvisational lyrics that he ad-libbed most of the lyrics on his Heroes album.

In the 1980s, Iggy was financially struggling and facing the same demons of his early career.
At this time, Bowie famously covered the song they co-wrote together from The Idiot, ‘China Girl’ for his album, Let’s Dance. However, it’s lesser known that Bowie also covered two songs from Lust For Life, ‘Neighborhood Threat’ and ‘Tonight’ on his album Tonight, which helped Iggy get back on his feet financially and get clean.

‘The Passenger’ is loosely based on a Jim Morrison poem from his collection called “The Lords/Notes on Visions” and while many Berliners may like to imagine Iggy riding along on their enviable public transit system, the song is actually written from his perspective of riding shotgun in David Bowie’s car, since Iggy was without a car or license at the time. The title also takes its name from Michelangelo Antonioni’s movie The Passenger starring Jack Nicholson, which Pop had spotted on a billboard in LA before decamping to Berlin.

With the success of The Idiot, RCA had given the newly popular Pop a rather large advance to make his follow-up. As Iggy recounted to biographer Joe Ambrose in his book, Gimme Danger: The Story of Iggy Pop:

David and I had determined that we would record that album very quickly, which we wrote, recorded, and mixed in eight days, and because we had done it so quickly, we had a lot of money left over from the advance, which we split.”

Iggy Pop Celebrates 40 Years Of ‘Lust For Life’ With Vinyl Reissue

Lana Del Rey

Backed by subtle R&B beats, the track is Del Rey’s signature, brooding pop-noir approach before blooming into a much more three-dimensional, cinematic affair – packed with vivid imagery of her imagination being sent back while enjoying the music and crowds of the California desert.

Describing the new album as ‘more socially aware’, Del Rey said of ‘Lust For Life’: “I started out thinking that the whole record was gonna have a sort of a ’50s-’60s feeling, kind of some kind of Shangri-Las, early Joan Baez influences.” “But I don’t know, as the climate kept on getting more heated politically, I found lyrically everything was just directed towards that. So because of that, the sound just got really updated, and I felt like it was more wanting to talk to the younger side of the audience that I have. I guess it’s a little more socially aware. It’s kind of a global feeling.”

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Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd have teamed up again for the third time to release for ‘Lust For Life’, the title track from Lana’s upcoming new album .

It’s the third time the pair have collaborated, with Lana featuring on ‘Prisoner’ from The Weeknd’s 2015 album Beauty Behind the Madness and on two tracks from his 2016 LP Starboy.

‘Lust For Life’ was debuted on BBC 1 this week. It’s the second time LDR has released new music this week, following a song she’d written after Coachella Festival .

Lana Del Rey performing Lust For Life. (C) 2017 Lana Del Rey, under exclusive licence to Polydor Ltd. (UK). Under exclusive licence to Interscope Records in the USA

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Last February one month after the death of his close friend and collaborator David Bowie ,Iggy Pop covered Bowie’s “The Jean Genie” at Carnegie Hall. Two weeks earlier, he had said in an interview that he’s probably “closing up” and retiring from the recording business after the release of his new album Post Pop Depression with Josh Homme. If Pop seems a little morbid these days, well, it’s nothing new. A hell-bent, self-destructive streak runs through his entire body of work; in fact, that streak long ago became his calling card, along with this feral, hair-raising baritone. Hard to believe he launched his music career innocuously enough as fresh-faced James Osterberg, the drummer of various ’60s garage bands in Michigan such as The Iguanas and the Prime Movers.

iggy Pop’s next band, The Stooges, hit the scene like a runaway earthmover. Not that the band was particularly popular during its time. Formed in 1967 when he was still going by the name Iggy Stooge, The Psychedelic Stooges (soon shortened), the group harnessed the jet-engine power of fellow Michigan band The MC5 while droning on in a spectacularly Neanderthal way. The Stooges’ self-titled debut appeared in 1969, produced by The Velvet Underground’s John Cale, and it turned psychedelia into something overwhelmingly new: simple, primal, brutal, and blazing the trail for a new style of music still a decade away, punk rock. On the album’s best-known track, “I Wanna Be Your Dog,” Pop howls in an lascivious imitation of Ron Asheton’s wah-wah guitar, celebrating sexual submissiveness while paradoxically playing up the group’s own aggressive, distorted domination.

As great as The Stooges was, it’s an album that all but painted the band into a corner—that is, until Fun House blew off the roof. The blueprint from the first album is dutifully carried over no one ever accused The Stooges of being eclectic but the band’s attack is deepened, sharpened, and given a far more insidious atmosphere of transgression and hedonism. On top of that, the decision to bring saxophonist Steve Mackay into the mix on songs like “1970” and the sinuous, swaggering title track lent a jazzy edge that only enhanced the album’s ominous atmosphere. And Pop’s blistered voice urges on the noise like a drug-pushing drill sergeant. At the start of the ’70s, as rock ’n’ roll was congealing into corporate slickness, Fun House ripped off the skin and pissed in the wound.

Three years passed between “Fun House” and its follow-up, “Raw Power”. The album was billed under the name Iggy And The Stooges, reflecting the new star power of its self-abusive front man, whose bloody, destructive stage performances were already becoming the stuff of legend. But the band itself had disintegrated in a haze of drugs and reformed in those three years, giving Raw Power a far more abrasive and hard-edged sound; co-produced by Pop and his admirer David Bowie, the album’s ear-shredding, in-the-red chaos kick started the punk movement. On songs such as “Search And Destroy,” guitarist James Williamson threatens to split the heavens with his unhinged solos; meanwhile Pop weaves a new mythology of rock decadence that teeters on the brink of sanity and reality.

Barring the officially released demo Kill City in 1977 (recorded in 1975 and credited to Iggy Pop and James Williamson), The Stooges’ time in the studio was long over by the time Pop began in solo career in earnest with The Idiot. Released in 1977, the year punk exploded, it took a different route than all the groups The Stooges had inspired; instead of raw power, the album bears the cool, dour, synthetic tones that co-produced and collaborator Bowie was about to use on his Berlin Trilogy (The Idiot was also recorded in Berlin). In a way, Pop is fish-out-of-place on Krautrock-inspired tracks like “Nightclubbing” and the ethereal “China Girl” (later turned into a hit by Bowie himself). But it’s exactly this bewildered displacement and fresh context that makes The Idiot such a welcome jolt in Pop’s career arc—one that stretched his formidable voice into strange new shapes.

The second of Iggy Pop’s Berlin collaborations with Bowie released in 1977, Lust For Life produced Pop’s most identifiable solo hit: the Bowie-penned title track, a thumping, sinewy anthem that gleefully hurls Pop’s suicidal image back at itself. Falling much closer to Pop’s raw rock wheelhouse than The Idiot, Lust For Life nonetheless produced one of his most sultry songs: “The Passenger,” whose slinky, menacing vibe taps into the dark poetry that Pop always has lurking beneath his bad-boy surface. With punk in full swing, the movement’s forefather claimed his snotty offspring while striking out on his own assured yet anarchic path.

Pop’s third solo album, New Values, was released in 1979—his first without Bowie. Instead it was produced by his old Raw Power cohort James Williamson, who also supplies guitar. Rather than sounding like a Stooges rehash, though, the album ventured forth into bold new territory: sleek, sculpted, and lean, songs like the nervy title track gave Iggy Pop a clean canvas on which to reinvent himself. Accordingly, his vocal range is fully explored for the first time on record: From spoken-word proclamations to supple yelps to stentorian moans, he’d finally settled into his solo-artist role as a sophisticated provocateur and enfant terrible—even while Williamson sets off Stooges-era guitar explosions.

The ’80s should have been the decade where Pop reaped his hard-earned artistic rewards. Instead, it was pretty spotty. In spite of a strong pool of collaborators (The Sex Pistols’ Glen Matlock, Blondie’s Clem Burke and Chris Stein, Patti Smith Group’s Ivan Kral, and Bowie sideman Carlos Alomar) the run of albums including 1980’s Soldier, 1981’s Party, and 1982’s Zombie Birdhouse reflect a desperate frenzy of weirdness, mediocrity, and experimentation with only sporadic bursts of brilliance. Following a four-year break from studio albums, 1986’s Blah Blah Blah was Pop’s attempt to court the mainstream; with David Bowie back in the producer’s chair, the record resulted in a minor hit and something of a calling card for Pop in the ’80s, a slick cover of Johnny O’Keefe’s rock ’n’ roll oldie “Wild One (Real Wild Child).” Pop’s rebelliousness comes off as canned, but the album gave Pop another lease on music life—although it wasn’t capitalized on by 1988’s Instinct, a middling hard-rock team-up with The Sex Pistols’ Steve Jones that feels like a washed-out echo of Raw Power.

In the ’90s, the alternative boom brought many borderline underground artists out of the shadows—Pop somewhat included. He came out swinging with 1990’s Brick By Brick, a substantial album that boasted appearances from members of Guns N’ Roses plus another minor hit—a genuinely stirring duet with The B-52s’ Kate Pierson, “Candy.” With a new generation of stars, led by Kurt Cobain, singing his praises, the decade might have been huge for Iggy Pop, but his next three albums of the decade (1993’s American Caesar, 1996’s Naughty Little Doggie, and 1999’s Avenue B) were mostly muddled and confused, each one lesser than the one before it. Pop’s status as an icon was cemented—especially after “Lust For Life” was resurrected by its appearance on the soundtrack to 1996’s movie Trainspotting but his inability to funnel that into another classic record was frustrating. Yet wholly in line with his perverse brand of self-destructive integrity.

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In the ’70s, few would have predicted that Pop would make it to the year 2000, let alone release some of his most intriguing music in the 21st century. That’s not to say 2001’s Beat Em Up and 2003’s Skull Ring are good—they aren’t—but two significant things happened to Pop’s career in the new millennium: One, he started dabbling in French pop , and jazz, and two, he also got The Stooges back together. His French-inflected albums, 2009’s Préliminaires (consisting of original songs) and 2012’s Après (comprising covers of everyone from Serge Gainsbourg to Édith Piaf), aren’t entirely successful, but they’re both brave and compelling in their own way, giving Pop’s ever-more-cavernous voice a new atmosphere to breathe. The Stooges’ two reunion albums, 2007’s The Weirdness and 2013’s Ready To Die, are wildly uneven—the second is much better—but there are flashes of real combustion to that decades-old chemistry. His new album, Post Pop Depression, once again relies on top-notch collaborators, in this case a group led by Josh Homme of Queens Of The Stone Age, and it’s one of Pop’s best solo albums since The Idiot, Lust For Life, and New Values—mostly because it draws heavily from The Idiot, Lust For Life, and New Values. But if Post Pop Depression is indeed Pop’s swan song, he’s going out on a note that’s both dignified and fittingly creepy.

The Essentials purchases,

1. The Stooges, Fun House (1970) More confident and corrosive than The Stooges’ self-titled debut a year earlier,Fun House is not only Iggy Pop’s most potent statement about the dark side of the modern psyche—it captures American civilization at the cusp of an epic comedown.

2. Iggy Pop, The Idiot (1977) The Idiot is as much a Bowie album as a Pop one, and that’s its strength: icy, experimental, starkly chiseled, and filled with both dreamy electronics, it gave Pop’s wild-man persona a chillingly robotic sheen.

3. Iggy And The Stooges, Raw Power (1969) If ever an Iggy Pop album explodes out of the speakers, it’s Raw Power. Savage and incediary, every second feels like it’s about to shake apart at the molecular level. And Pop has never topped his fierce, apocalyptic imagery here.

4. The Stooges, The Stooges (1973) There’s something endearingly numbskull about The Stooges’ eponymous debut—a psychedelic record that bulldozes over every flower in its path. But it’s also steeped in shadows and Pop’s pulsing, psychotic desire.

5. Iggy Pop, Lust For Life (1977) The title track of Lust For Life may have been used in one too many TV commercials for its punch to be fully retained, but Pop’s sophomore solo album as a whole remains a giddy, meaty match-up between Bowie’s vestigial glam stomp and Pop’s fiery abandon.

Thanks To The AV Club


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