Posts Tagged ‘Linda McCartney’

McCartney on stage playing guitar and singing.

5-episode Documentary series about the fascinating musical career of Paul McCartney. Episode 1 focuses on 1970-1975. this is a most outstanding documentary, probably the best I have seen on McCartney done with flair, care, expertise and with such a touch of magic that by making it so very special it easily transcends the usual formulaic dirge we’ve been given over the years about The Beatles and their solo careers. I sincerely hope that MPL gets wind of this and realises what a genius they could add to their stable or at least get involved with future McCartney projects. This also will mean such a great deal to the true fans who transcended from The Beatles to the Solo Beatles including myself. Ironic that as Paul was slipping into depression in the autumn of 69 while we were all bathing in the wonderment of Abbey Road…. Without question though imo 70/71 was Pauls finest, the quartet of McCartney/Ram/ Wild Life still retain such a magical aura all of their own.

I loved BOTR & Venus & Mars, but it’s always those first 3 albums I return to again and again. For anyone’s interest Little Lamb Dragonfly on the Red Rose Speedway album was actually recorded in the Ram sessions, and when you learn that fact you realise that it really does belong on Ram. The essential inclusion (and often overlooked) thoughts, feelings and observations of Denny Seiwell , Denny Laine & Henry McCulloch are so vital to the first Wings lineup and very moving too. Their own words reflect how much respect they had for Paul, and really it shows how sadly too they were let down financially leaving Denny Seiwell  and Henry no alternative but to leave. Had Paul perhaps paid the same attention to their payments of salaries that he did to his music they would have never walked out. Linda sadly got a lot of stick at the time but her vocal harmonies (with Denny too) were pure magic and a musical legacy her to be rightly proud of.

As the Beatles were breaking up in 1969–70, McCartney fell into a depression. His wife helped him pull out of that condition by praising his work as a songwriter and convincing him to continue writing and recording. In her honour, he wrote “Maybe I’m Amazed”, explaining that with the Beatles breaking up, “that was my feeling: Maybe I’m amazed at what’s going on … Maybe I’m a man and maybe you’re the only woman who could ever help me; Baby won’t you help me understand … Maybe I’m amazed at the way you pulled me out of time, hung me on the line, Maybe I’m amazed at the way I really need you.” He added that “every love song I write is for Linda.”

One of my favourite elements about this series is how much input there is from people who actually got the chance to work and collaborate with McCartney. Having that kind of “outside” perspective is especially useful when one’s main subject is not very much given to self-examination. And it’s amazing to see how much love and respect Paul creates around him, more clearly observed in the people whose feelings didn’t get distorted by hurt, envy, and bitterness.

5-episode Documentary series on Paul McCartney’s fascinating music career. Episode 2 spans 1975-1980,

Following the addition of guitarist Henry McCullough, Wings’ first concert tour began in 1972 with a debut performance in front of an audience of seven hundred at the University of Nottingham. Ten more gigs followed as they travelled across the UK in a van during an unannounced tour of universities, during which the band stayed in modest accommodation and received pay in coinage collected from students, while avoiding Beatles songs during their performances. McCartney later said, “The main thing I didn’t want was to come on stage, faced with the whole torment of five rows of press people with little pads, all looking at me and saying, ‘Oh well, he is not as good as he was.’ So we decided to go out on that university tour which made me less nervous … by the end of that tour I felt ready for something else, so we went into Europe.” During the seven-week, 25-show Wings Over Europe Tour, the band played almost solely Wings and McCartney solo material: the Little Richard cover “Long Tall Sally” was the only song that had previously been recorded by the Beatles. McCartney wanted the tour to avoid large venues; most of the small halls they played had capacities of fewer than 3,000 people. Wings followed Band on the Run with the chart-topping albums Venus and Mars (1975) and Wings at the Speed of Sound (1976). In 1980, McCartney released his second solo LP, the self-produced McCartney II, which peaked at number one in the UK and number three in the US. As with his first album, he composed and performed it alone. The album contained the song “Coming Up”, the live version of which, recorded in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1979 by Wings, became the group’s last number-one hit. By 1981, McCartney felt he had accomplished all he could creatively with Wings and decided he needed a change. The group discontinued in April 1981 after Laine quit following disagreements over royalties and salaries.

5-episode Documentary series about the fascinating musical career of Paul McCartney. Episode 3 focuses on the 1980s. McCartney participated in Live Aid, performing “Let it Be”,

In September 1989, they launched the Paul McCartney World Tour, his first in over a decade. During the tour, McCartney performed for the largest paying stadium audience in history on 21st April 1990, when 184,000 people attended his concert at Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.That year, he released the triple album Tripping the Live Fantastic, which contained selected performances from the tour.

5-episode Documentary series about the fascinating musical career of Paul McCartney. Episode 4 focuses on the 1990s.

In 1991, McCartney performed a selection of acoustic-only songs on MTV Unplugged and released a live album of the performance titled Unplugged (The Official Bootleg). During the 1990s, McCartney collaborated twice with Youth of Killing Joke as the musical duo “the Fireman”. The two released their first electronica album together, Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, in 1993. McCartney released the rock album Off the Ground in 1993. The subsequent New World Tour followed, which led to the release of the Paul Is Live album later that year

5-episode Documentary series on Paul McCartney’s fascinating music career. Episode 5 is a “double album” covering some of Paul’s greatest works spanning a total of two decades: Part 1 focuses on 2000-2010, Part 2 covers 2010-2020.

In 1997, McCartney released the rock album Flaming Pie. Ringo Starr appeared on drums and backing vocals in “Beautiful Night”. Later that year, he released the classical work Standing Stone, which topped the UK and US classical charts.[155] In 1998, he released Rushes, the second electronica album by the Fireman. In 1999, McCartney released Run Devil Run. Recorded in one week, and featuring Ian Paice and David Gilmour, it was primarily an album of covers with three McCartney originals. He had been planning such an album for years, having been previously encouraged to do so by Linda, who had died of cancer in April 1998.

McCartney did an unannounced performance at the benefit tribute, “Concert for Linda,” his wife of 29 years who died a year earlier. It was held at the Royal Albert Hall in London on 10th April 1999, and was organised by two of her close friends, Chrissie Hynde and Carla Lane.

McCartney’s enduring fame has made him a popular choice to open new venues. In 2009, he played to three sold-out concerts at the newly built Citi Field, a venue constructed to replace Shea Stadium in Queens, New York. These performances yielded the double live album Good Evening New York City later that year. McCartney remains one of the world’s top draws.

Photo of Paul in his London garden.

LIMITED EDITION 50th ANNIVERSARY HALF-SPEED-MASTERED VINYL RELEASED FOR RECORD STORE DAY 2020

In June, 2020 one of the greatest solo debuts in rock history, Paul McCartney’s McCartney, will receive a special 50th anniversary release in a limited edition half-speed mastered vinyl pressing for Record Store Day.

Originally released in April 1970, one month before The Beatles’ swansong ‘Let It Be’, McCartney  saw Paul getting back to basics. Writing every song and playing every instrument (with backing vocals from Linda McCartney), the eponymous album represented a creative rebirth, bursting with new ideas, experiments, playfulness and freedom. Sonically, McCartney’s bare-bones home recording aesthetic imbued the album with an authentic lo-fi spirit, a much sought after sound that continues to retain a contemporary edge 50 years on. In contrast to the professional difficulties that came with the demise of the world’s most iconic band,

Paul was personally enjoying the contentment of family life as a newly married father. In a Q&A released at the time, Paul described the theme and feel of the album as, “Home, family, love.”  This is obvious from the opening notes of Lovely Linda throughout the album, with tracks like ‘Every Night’ and ‘Man We Was Lonely’ musing on how much Paul’s life had improved—and nowhere more poignantly than on the tour de force ‘Maybe I’m Amazed’. Paul’s timeless tribute to Linda would be recognized as one of contemporary music’s great love songs, and remains a staple of Paul’s live set to this day, never failing to inspire tears of joy with its refrain of “Maybe I’m a man in the middle of something that he doesn’t really understand. Maybe I’m a man. Maybe you’re the only woman who can ever help me. Baby won’t you help me understand”.

Linda’s presence is also felt in the album’s iconic artwork: the front cover’s bowl of cherries photographed by her on holiday in Antigua, and the back cover’s portrait of Paul with daughter Mary as a baby, photographed on the family’s farm in Scotland where some of the album was also written. 50 years and counting, McCartney offers an incredible insight into the mind of one of the world’s greatest ever songwriters. The homespun spirit of the album and Paul’s taste for experimentation capture a unique moment in time: The very first steps of an unparalleled solo career that has seen Paul McCartney release decades worth of critically acclaimed commercial blockbuster albums including RAM, Band on the Run, Venus and Mars, Tug of War, Pipes of Peace, Flowers in the Dirt, Flaming Pie, Memory Almost Full, and most recently 2018’s-charting Egypt Station.

The 50th anniversary Record Store Day limited edition of McCartney was pressed from a master cut by Miles Showell at half speed using the original 1970 master tapes at Abbey Road Studios. It was made as a vinyl specific transfer in high resolution and without digital peak limiting for the best possible reproduction.

McCartney Tracklisting:

Side one:
The Lovely Linda
That Would Be Something
Valentine Day
Every Night
Hot as Sun/Glasses
Junk
Man We Was Lonely

Side two:
Oo You
Momma Miss America
Teddy Boy
Singalong Junk
Maybe I’m Amazed
Kreen-Akrore

Ram is a studio album by recording artists Paul and Linda McCartney, released 17th May 1971 on Apple Records.The album was recorded amid Paul McCartney’s legal action in Britain’s High Court to dissolvethe Beatles‘ partnership, following their break-up the year before. The only album credited to the couple, Ram was the second of two albums that McCartney released between quitting the Beatles and forming his own band, Wings. He and Linda recorded it in New York with guitarists David Spinozza and Hugh McCracken, and future Wings drummer Denny Seiwell. Its release coincided with a period of bitter acrimony between McCartney and his former bandmate John Lennon, who perceived verbal slights in the lyrics to songs such as “Too Many People“.

On release, the album was received negatively by the majority of music critics, although opinion has become more favourable in subsequent decades. A commercial success nonetheless, Ram topped the national albums charts in Britain, the Netherlands and Canada. Three singles were issued from Ram: “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey“, which became McCartney’s first number 1 hit in America, The Back Seat of My Car and Eat at Home. The album was reissued in May 2012.

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a fun song McCartney wrote about his real uncle Albert. The nonsensical lyrics pertain to the happy, sort of crazy things people do when they are in the company of their families. The song is actually relatable to all people who have had enjoyable times with their families – uncles, aunts, cousins, brothers, sisters, grandparents, etc. The joyous feel to “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” struck a chord with people overseas in America. The song quickly reached #1 on the billboard charts very shortly after it was released.

Paul McCartney and his family flew to New York City in October 1970 to begin working on the follow-up to McCartney.

While McCartney had featured him on every instrument, for Ram Paul decided to hold auditions for musicians, bringing some in under the guise of a session to record a commercial jingle. Auditions were held in an attic on 45th Street for three days,[where David Spinozza was tapped for guitar duties, after being asked by Linda, before auditions moved to a basement, where Denny Seiwell was recruited on drums. McCartney later claimed to have found Seiwell “lying on a mattress one day in The Bronx“. Midway through the sessions, Spinozza was replaced by Hugh McCracken when Spinozza became unavailable.

The basic tracks for the album were taped at Columbia’s Studio B from 12th October to 20th November 1970 before the McCartneys returned to their Scottish farm for the Christmas holidays. Work continued at Studio B and A&R Recording Studios, New York, from the second week of January 1971 through to February. Playing guitar or piano and singing at the same time, Paul chose to overdub his bass later on. Although it was a collaborative project, Linda’s vocal duties were mostly limited to singing harmonies and backing Paul, who sang almost all of the lead parts; however, Linda sang co-lead vocals on Long Haired Lady. The New York Philharmonic was brought in by McCartney to play on Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey“, “Long Haired Lady andThe Back Seat of My Car“, as well as the McCartneys’ forthcoming, non-album single Another Day“. Paul and Linda’s daughter, Heather, sang backing vocals on “Monkberry Moon Delight“.

In July 1971, Northern Songs and Maclen Music sued Paul and Linda McCartney for violating an exclusive rights agreement by collaborating on the song Another Day“, released three months before Ram. Although six of the eleven songs on Ram were also co-written with Linda, both parties agreed the issue of royalties for the album could be decided at a later date.The lyrics to Paul McCartney & Wings’ classic “Another Day” which was originally released as a single in 1971, but never appeared on original copies of any album. Re-releases of the album Ram include “Another Day,” but it is also featured on their greatest hits albums. This particular recording came from Wingspan: Hits and History Disc 1

In June 1972, ATV announced that “all differences between them have been amicably settled” and Paul and Linda signed a new seven-year co-publishing contract between ATV and McCartney Music. The sessions also produced songs such as “Dear Friend”, released on Wings debut album, Wild Life (1971), and  Little Woman Love“, as well as tracks featured on Wings’ 1973 album Red Rose Speedway: “Get on the Right Thing“, “Little Lamb Dragonfly” and Big Barn Bed“. It has recently surfaced that “I Lie Around”, issued as the B-side to Wings’ 1973 single “Live and Let Die”, was taped during the sessions. Also recorded was the first incarnation of Seaside Woman“.

The album was mixed at Sound Recorders in Los Angeles. By early 1971, the project was completed, along with “Another Day” and its B-side,Oh Woman, Oh Why“. In addition to the songs released on Ram and the first two Wings albums, McCartney recorded the following tracks during these sessions: “Hey Diddle”, “A Love for You”, “Great Cock and Seagull Race”, “Now Hear This Song of Mine”, “Rode All Night”, “Sunshine Sometime” and “When the Wind Is Blowing”.

In 2009, two tribute albums featuring all of the songs from the album were made available for digital download:

See the source image

Paul McCartney and Wings“Listen to What the Man Said” presents as a breezy romp, but sessions for the smash single were actually a painstaking drag. That is, until a key contributor came in and nailed his part on the very first try. “It was one of the songs we’d gone in with high hopes for,” McCartney said in 1975. “Whenever I would play it on the piano, people would say ‘Oh, I like that one.’ But when we did the backing track, we thought we didn’t really get it together at all.”

“Mainly we’re coming here to make our own album,” McCartney told local reporters back then. “I don’t like to come to a place and use too much of the local talent, because you get people saying, ‘Oh, they’re taking our style.” But New Orleans worked its way into the proceedings anyway.

Wings stayed at the Le Richelieu Hotel in the French Quarter, right in the middle of the annual Carnival festivities. During a break from recording, Paul and Linda dressed as a pair of clowns then actually waded into the crowds on February 1975, as revelers celebrated Mardi Gras. Wings went back the next day to complete a raucous future b-side called “My Carnival,” before returning to the still-unfinished “Listen What the Man Said.”

Dave Mason of Traffic fame happened to be in town on tour, so a frustrated McCartney brought him in. “A couple of the guys from Wings came by to the see the show, and we had a day off the next day,” said  Mason “They said: ‘Why don’t you come down to the studio? I’m sure Paul would love to see you.’ So, I just stopped by, and they happened to be cutting ‘Listen to What the Man Said.’ Paul was, like: ‘Hey, c’mon, you should sit in with us.'”

McCartney still remained dissatisfied. At this point, a song that ended up as the gold-selling lead single from Venus and Mars seemed to be going absolutely nowhere. Mulling it over, McCartney hit upon another idea: “We thought it would be great to have a very technical musician come in and do a great lyrical solo,” That’s when someone in the studio mentioned that Tom Scott, the well-known jazz saxophonist, lived nearby. “We said, ‘Yeah, give him a ring, see if he turns up,’ and he turned up within half an hour!” McCartney said. “There he was with his sax, and he sat down in the studio playing through. The engineer [Alan O’Duffy] was recording it. We kept all the notes he was playing casually. [Scott] came in and I said ‘I think that’s it.’ He said ‘Did you record that?’ I said yes, and we listened to it back.”

The instrumental track for “Listen to What the Man Said” was finally complete. “No one could believe it, so [Scott] went out and tried a few more,” McCartney told Gambaccini, “but they weren’t as good. He’d had all the feel on this early take, the first take.”

As McCartney completed the vocal, O’Duffy added a barely heard Easter egg, positioned right after Paul sings “soldier boy kisses girl.” “I do remember exactly that it was lovely Linda who did the kiss on a microphone during one of the vocal takes,” O’Duffy said in Luca Perasi’s Paul McCartney: Recordings Sessions. “I made a point of making sure it was audible in the mix later at Wally Heider Studios.”

Issued on May 16, 1975, “Listen to What the Man Said” became Paul McCartney and Wings‘ eighth consecutive and the fourth of their seven total No. 1 singles.

Mason and Scott became part of a group of outside collaborators on Venus and Mars. Toussaint played piano on “Rock Show.” Local legends George Porter Jr. and Benny Spellman appeared on “My Carnival.” O’Duffy also hired trombonist and arranger Tony Dorsey, an area native; Dorsey then brought in some college buddies to complete the horn section.

In a final nod to his Big Easy surroundings, McCartney attached a pre-song sentence to “Listen What the Man Said”: “Alright, okay, very good to see you down in New Orleans, man – yeah reet, yeah yeah,” he mumbled, impersonating Meters guitarist Leo Nocentelli. McCartney later invited the Meters to play at the release party for Venus and Mars, held aboard the Queen Mary out of Long Beach, Calif.

As a further addition to the Paul McCartney Collection of Re-issues the two Wings albums VENUS AND MARS and WINGS AT THE SPEED OF SOUND were issued at the end of September 2014, originally recorded in 1975 and 1976 they were made available as a standard 2CD set and a deluxe 2CD 1 DVD and Book with 135 pages of photos and memorabilia, all included unreleased tracks and demos. these releases are following the superb sets of BAND ON THE RUN, McCARTNEY and McCARTNEY II and the live set WINGS OVER AMERICA,

ram

Paul and Linda McCartney released the album RAM, the second solo album from McCartney after the acrimonious Beatles Split and the ongoing issues within the management and legal side and the formation of the band WINGS, recorded between November 1970 and April 1971 at Columbia Studios and AR Studios in New York City.
The song “RAM ON” from the albums first side was reprised on the second side before the final track in a similar vein to the Beatles “Abbey Road” album medley . there were three singles issued “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”, “The Back Seat Of My Car” and the song “Eat At Hope” . Reviews were harsh at the time and Lennon had spoken that it was Muzak to his ears, but decades later the album has received praise for its big melodies and orchestral trippery.
check out music blog site Aquarium Drunkard who released a LA band members cover of the whole album.