Posts Tagged ‘Lee Pardini’

Courtesy of Big Hassle PR

Dawes return to their roots-rock origins for their seventh album, recorded with Nashville superproducer Dave Cobb. “Good Luck With Whatever” comes two years after their previous effort, Passwords, which found the band exploring textured modern rock with long time collaborator Jonathan Wilson. But early offerings from the new LP suggest something closer to the sound of the band’s first two albums: “St. Augustine At Night” is an intricate novella-style song that conjures classic Taylor Goldsmith epics like “A Little Bit of Everything,” while upbeat rockers like “Who Do You Think You’re Talking To?” finds the band channeling Eighties Petty. “In the past, I’ve definitely been more precious about the way I wanted the songs to sound, but that’s never as fun,” Goldsmith has said of Good Luck With Whatever. “The fact that we’re able to lean on each other and celebrate each other as individuals just makes us so much more excited about getting to play together in this band.”

The L.A. rock band Dawes will release their first new album since 2018’s Passwords later this year. Good Luck With Whatever is out October. 2nd on Rounder Records, and lead single “Who Do You Think You’re Talking To?” is out now alongside a fun new music video. The band, helmed by guitarist Taylor Goldsmith alongside his brother Griffin and their compadres Wylie Gelber (bass) and Lee Pardini (keys), recorded the new album at RCA Studios in Nashville, Tenn., with one of Music City’s most in-demand producers, Dave Cobb. “We’re a living breathing organism,” Pardini said in a statement. “People love to say, ‘this record sounds so THIS’ and ‘that record sounds so THAT,’ but to us, it just sounds like Dawes. We make records to document where we are at that time, but every time I check, it just sounds like Griff, Taylor, Wylie and me.”

Release date: October 2nd

Dawes press photo 2020

Dawes have released “St. Augustine At Night” as another preview of their first album for Rounder Records, and seventh studio release overall, “Good Luck With Whatever,” which is due on October 2nd. Says Goldsmith: “‘St. Augustine at Night’ is a song about one’s relationship to their hometown, but also is a song about the varying degrees in which we all watch our lives pass us by.”  The five-minute track strikes a confessional, reflective air, with simple accompaniment to frontman Taylor Goldsmith’s vocals by acoustic guitar and piano. The band, also featuring Griffin Goldsmith (drums), Wylie Gelber (bass) and Lee Pardini (keys), introduced “St. Augustine At Night” at some of their shows on their 2019 tour.

It’s been 11 years (next month) since L.A. rockers Dawes launched dual residencies that fueled the success of their debut album “North Hills” and cemented them as Southern California favourites. Six albums later, their take on Everyman classic rock has aged well — familiar, earnest, relatable music that wears like denim.

The quartet — Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith, Wylie Gerber and Lee Pardini — today announced that their seventh album, “Good Luck With Whatever,” will be out October. 2nd. It’s their first release for Rounder Records.

“In the past, I’ve definitely been more precious about the way I wanted the songs to sound, but that’s never as fun,” Taylor Goldsmith says of the album. “The music we make is everyone’s mode of expression, and the other guys all have chops that I don’t have and never will. The fact that we’re able to lean on each other and celebrate each other as individuals just makes us so much more excited about getting to play together in this band.”

The first single “Who Do you Think You’re Talking To?” is a saxophone short of a blue-jeaned Springsteen, the kind of tune you blare on the open road. “This song is about the way we bring our baggage with us as we move away from traumatic experiences and relationships,” Goldsmith says. “And the irony of sometimes our newer partners needing to be part of the processing more so than the folks who caused the trouble in the first place. It’s also about the other side of that coin — trying to assess a situation but knowing when not to take it personally and also finding a way to avoid over-analyzing.

“As a band, it was the first time we’ve ventured into certain grooves/arrangements for our tunes, so it was fun to push ourselves, see what felt natural and what we could get away with.”

The album was produced by six-time Grammy winner Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell) at Nashville’s RCA Studio A. Caitlin Gerard directs the video.

In June, Dawes released “Live From Richmond, VA,” a digital album with proceeds going to Reform Jails LA and Black Lives Matter LA.  In the midst of all this changing and learning and growing we have decided to release ‘Live From Richmond’ as a digital download on @bandcamp with 100% of our proceeds being split 50/50 between @reformlajails and @blmlosangeles. Please check out both organizations if you have the chance.
Yesterday someone I admire told me that this is the first time they have felt hopeful in years. I’ve got a lot of work to do and this is barely just the beginning….but I feel hopeful too. And that feels so good. I hope you enjoy the music. Link in the bio. – TG The band’s last studio album was 2018’s Passwords, the last of three on HUB Records. 

Band Members:
Wylie Gelber,
Taylor Goldsmith,
Griffin Goldsmith,
Lee Pardini,

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From the first downbeat, Good Luck With Whatever, the seventh studio Album by the Los Angeles based rock band Dawes, sets a tone all its own. The album unfurls with the crunchy chordal cadence of what could only be Goldsmith’s guitar. As the band quickly hop their way aboard this rhythmic rail car, we find ourselves thinking “Hey, these guys are pretty good. I’m so glad you dragged me to see some live music!” — “Still Feel Like A Kid” serves as a reminder that we all love a good filet, but there’s no shame in still ordering off the kids menu from time to time. You can hear the eye contact in the room, you can see the lyrics as they fly from Goldsmith’s mouth straight into your ears, you’ll find yourself singing along to a song you’re hearing for the first time. It’s fresh, it’s raw, it’s a four tiered seafood tower of all American ear candy. Think “I Don’t Wanna Grow Up, I’m A Toys R Us Kid” meets “I Wanna Be Sedated”.

Recorded at the historic RCA studios in Nashville Tennessee, the boys teamed up with six time Grammy award winning producer Dave “Corn On The” Cobb (Brandi, Jasi, Chrisi, Stergi, etc) and just decided to LET IT RIP. “We were out in Nashville for just under 730 hours, or 1 human month” says bass player and resident ‘problem child’ Wylie Gelber. “We wanted that sloth like urgency, that cold heat, that all knowing curiosity. And me thinks that’s what we got.” The arrangements are as lively as they are lovely, from the rapidly ruckus “Who Do You Think You’re Talking To” to the robustly restrained “St. Augustine at Night”. A culmination of their entire catalogue and career all wrapped up in nine tracks. If you don’t know Dawes by now, you will never never never know them…

Far from apathetic,Good Luck With Whatever is Dawes at their most unapologetic. It’s sympathetic and magnetic, 50% genetic and highly kinetic. Songs like “Didn’t Fix Me” and “Me Especially” showcase Goldsmith’s poetic prowess perfectly; a historian of the human condition, transforming turmoil into motor oil. Drop the tone arm down, turn the volume up, unplug the phone and if you still feel nothing… call a doctor.

This album is a celebration of each other and our closeness as a group. It’s the 4 of us live in a room not hiding behind any sort of studio magic. This band has made us stronger and brought us closer through the years and we’re recognizing that and are more proud of that than ever.

“This song is about the way we bring our baggage with us as we move away from traumatic experiences and relationships. And the irony of sometimes our newer partners needing to be part of the processing more so than the folks who caused the trouble in the first place.

It’s also about the other side of that coin – trying to assess a situation but knowing when not to take it personally and also finding a way to avoid over analyzing.

As a band it was the first time we’ve ventured into certain grooves/arrangements for our tunes, so it was fun to push ourselves, see what felt natural and what we could get away with.” Dawes began their journey in the San Fernando Valley back in 2009, it was the year of the Ox, but don’t be fooled, these guys are No Bulls#$t. Having played with, for, and against some of rock’n roll’s most illustrious icons, the merry men have picked up more than a few things when it comes to sticking around and what it means to be a true BAND. “Sometimes I wish I did hate my brother”, explains frontman/stuntman Taylor Goldsmith, “might sell us a few more books… but the reality is, I can’t get enough of the guy! Scariest part bout’ it all is, knowing we’re gonna be playing music together for a long, long time.”

Taylor Goldsmith (Guitar, Vocals) – Griffin Goldsmith (Drums, Vocals) Wylie Gelber (Sweet Sweet Bass) – Lee Pardini (Keys, Vocals)

Dawes “Wish Everyone Good Luck With Whatever” July 22nd, 2020

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Dawes: <i>Passwords</i> Review

Taylor Goldsmith and his band Dawes latest album release. “Passwords”, This Is Dawes’ sixth studio album, It features 10 new soft-rock songs indebted to Laurel Canyon circa 1972 and in particular the sound of Jackson Browne, with plaintive melodies, soothing piano and lyrical platitudes that are just unspecific enough to feel relatable, like the scenarios in self-help books. There’s the earnest, if self-satisfied, attempt to find common ground on “Crack the Case,” where Goldsmith murmurs rueful lyrics as piano and acoustic guitars mingle behind him. His regretful would-be lover on “Mistakes We Should Have Made” wishes he’d gone for the kiss despite the obstacles, his ardor framed by the prominent snap of a snare drum pushing a mix of acoustic guitar and keyboards, with distant backing vocals from the girls of Lucius. “Feed the Fire” slides around on a slippery guitar riff and shimmery synth parts, and Goldsmith reflects on empty ambition at the top of his vocal range in a way that calls to mind Private Eyes-era Hall & Oates.

Passwords, inspiration pulls guitarist/ singer Taylor Goldsmith, drummer Griffin Goldsmith, bassist Wylie Gelber, and keyboardist Lee Pardini into their most universal, topical territory to date. This is a record about the modern world: the relationships that fill it, the politics that divide it, the small victories and big losses that give it shape. Taylor’s writing is personal at points – the result of his recent engagement, which lends a sense of gravity and self-reflection to album highlights like “Time Flies Either Way” and “I Can’t Love” – but it also zooms out, focusing not on the director himself, but on everything within the lens.

Dawes' Taylor Goldsmith on the Secrets of <i>Passwords</i>

Some artists are naturally loathe to discuss their work in microscopic detail, lest any telling trade secrets be revealed. Not perpetually-disheveled Dawes frontman and main songwriter Taylor Goldsmith. At the mere mention of the Los Angeles group’s slightly sinister new sixth set Passwords, he sings like a canary over every last nuance of the Jonathan-Wilson-produced set, which opens with the Brontosaurus-stomping “Living in the Future” and the abject ode to apathy and ennui, “Stay Down.” And he holds nothing back.

“On one hand, it was important for me to start the record with those two tracks, since they were the bleakest of all he songs, and I felt like if the album were to end with either of those songs, we would have been sending a listener off in the wrong mood,” he explains. “And that’s a mood that we don’t believe in or subscribe to. Other more upbeat numbers like “Crack the Case” and “Time Flies Either Way” are a reaction to that attitude, so I was questioning certain things in life, of what it means to be alive at this moment in time.”

Elsewhere, he expands on these theories, like in “Feed the Fire,” wherein his need for stardom is the same flame that will eventually consume him, and on “I Can’t Love,” which—without cynicism—celebrates the new love he’s found with his fiancée, actress Mandy Moore. “And ‘Greatest Invention’ is a swan song to an image of a woman that never existed,” he says. “And the whole record is about where we’re living, how dark I might feel about it, and then finding some sort of purpose and some sort of meaning in a connection with just one person.”

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American band Dawes have announced a new studio album, their first since 2016’s We’re All Gonna Die. Called Passwords, it’s due out on June 22nd via the band’s own HUB Records. “Passwords” is described as an album “for and about the modern age” in a press release. “We’re living in such a unique moment in history,” said lead singer Taylor Goldsmith. “Many of these songs are an attempt to come to terms with the modern world, while always trying to consider both sides of the story.”

For the record, Dawes reunited with producer Jonathan Wilson, with whom the band recorded its first two albums. “Part of the DNA of Dawes was shaped by Jonathan, much like your first serious girlfriend dictates how you approach relationships for the rest of your life,” Taylor said. “Those first two Dawes records have a certain essence to them. We were figuring out who we were. When it came time to produce our sixth album, why not go back to the guy who started it all with us?”.

 

Full band performances, as well as Taylor’s vocal takes, were tracked live during recording in an effort to emulate the energy of their live performances. They also tease a “spacier, experimental approach” on a few songs due to the integration of keyboardist Lee Pardini, who joined the band in 2015.

Taylor also said there’s a “slight political implication” buried in the album’s titled, emphasizing “the idea that something so seemingly innocuous and frivolous can potentially shift the direction of a life or even a country.”

He added, “But more broadly than that, a password – this series of numbers, letters and figures – serves as a thin veil between a world you can see and understand, and one you can’t. That means songs can be passwords, too, because they’re a means of giving access to someone else’s perspective, thereby elaborating your own. Songs can unlock something in you, change something, tighten something, enlighten some-thing, or gain access into deeper corners, and that idea makes referring to a collection of songs as Passwords feel really good.”

Dawes will also be hitting the road later this summer with Jeff Lynne’s Electric Light Orchestra, who are embarking on their first North American tour in over 30 years.

DAWES New album Passwords available June 22nd.HUB Records