Posts Tagged ‘Kim Deal’

The Pixies“Doolittle” is to be thirty years old this month, it was the second studio album by American alternative rock band Pixies, released in April 1989 on 4AD Records. The album’s offbeat and dark subject material, featuring references to surrealism, Biblical violence, torture and death, contrasts with the clean production sound achieved by the newly hired producer Gil Norton. Doolittle was the Pixies‘ first international release.

Pixies released two singles from “Doolittle”, “Here Comes Your Man” and “Monkey Gone to Heaven”, both of which were chart successes.  “Debaser” the opener from that classic album, “Debaser” is a lot of people’s favourite Pixies song. When they play it live, it’s a guaranteed catalyst for chaos on the floor. Played live or on record, it’s a song that illustrates the alchemy that the Pixies are capable of at their peak. If you strip it down to its base elements, there’s really nothing to it ,  Black Francis’ nonsense lyrics – nominally inspired by the Buñuel/Dali surrealist film Un Chien Andalou, but essentially meaningless, though well-suited to being barked out by the frontman, Along with Joey Santiago’s four-chord riff and simple finger-picked accents and Kim Deal’s characteristic bassline for beginners.

Of course when it all comes together, driven by one of David Lovering’s best performances on drums and executed with passion and panache and more enthusiasm than a band that’s starting to fall apart should be able to muster, it’s a majestic, superlative, enduring, adrenalized, alt-rock classic. augmented by Kim’s backing vocals. Joey doesn’t have to shred when he’s making such an uplifting, joyous noise and that bassline – well, that’s trademark Pixies.

This album “Doolittle” still sounds sensational three decades on – from Debaser through to Gouge Away. The Pixies, at their best, aren’t so much a band as a group of alchemists.

Despite being issued on hi-res SACD in the past this is the Doolittle‘s debut in 5.1. Kevin Vanbergen has created the new surround mix from the original analogue multi-tracks.

This new edition will also feature an HD transfer of the original stereo mix by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab. The album was reissued back in 2014 for its 25th anniversary. The album has been cited as inspirational by many alternative artists, while numerous music publications have ranked it as one of the most influential albums ever. A 2003 poll of NME writers ranked Doolittle as the second-greatest album of all time.

This blu-ray audio of Doolittle was released on 9th December and is on Amazon in the USA and is available to pre-order from the 4AD Records store.

Pixies
  • Black Francis – vocals, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar
  • Kim Deal – bass guitar, vocals, acoustic slide guitar on “Silver”
  • Joey Santiago – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • David Lovering – drums, lead vocals on “La La Love You”, bass guitar on “Silver”

pixies-bluray-wallet-inside

Advertisements

'Pacer'

Released in the immediate aftermath of the runaway success of The Breeders’ platinum-selling second album,Last Splash, and the Pixies calling it a day the first time round, The Amps are an important part of the Kim Deal canon.

First intended as a solo project, The Amps instead grew into a fully-fledged band with Jim MacPherson from The Breeders joining on drums and Dayton, OH musicians Luis Lerma and Nate Farley on bass and guitar respectively.  Releasing just one album, “Pacer”, in 1995, and after a whirlwind of touring with the likes of Foo Fighters, Guided By Voices and Sonic Youth, Kim returned them to the shelf, leaving behind one of her most intriguing chapters.

With the first vinyl repress on 4AD Records “Pacer” is finally getting the reappraisal it richly deserves.

The Amps released just the one album ‘Pacer’ back in 1995 – featuring Kim Deal, Jim MacPherson, Nate Farley and Luis Lerma. You’ll often hear a couple of Amps tracks when The Breeders play live

Image002

Being released this November as part of Record Store Day’s sister Black Friday event is a faithful repress of the 12” version of The Breeders’ Safari EP, complete with Shinro Ohtake’s 1983 charcoal drawing Nairobi VIII adorning its cover. Originally released in April 1992, sandwiched between their first two albums (Pod and Last Splash), The Breeders’ Safari EP came at a time when Kim’s Pixies commitments were winding down and her new band were on the cusp of releasing a platinum-selling album.

Their first record to feature Kim Deal’s twin Kelley, the EP was recorded in two studios with the bulk coming from a session in New York, which provided an early version of Do You Love Me Now?, Don’t Call Home and a cover of The Who’s So Sad About Us. The title track, Safari, was recorded separately in London by Kim, Josephine Wiggs and drummer Jon Mattock (Spacemen 3 / Spiritualized).

Image result for the breeders

The Breeders perform Cannonball on Later… with Jools Holland on BBC Two (22nd May 2018). Kim Deal emerges from the wreckage of alt-rock heroes the Pixies with her twin sister, Kelley, on guitar and a freewheeling, shaggyheaded, bighearted mess of a song. “Cannonball” was one of the weirdest radio hits of the Nineties – or any decade before it.The Breeders busted out an old favorite on Tuesday night’s episode of the live BBC late-night show Later…with Jools Holland with a performance of their 1993 breakthrough hit “Cannonball.” The Deal sisters and company also played “Wait in the Car,” the first single off of their fantastic  2018 album All Nerve.

Marvel at the extreme, head-on closeup of Kim Deal’sface as she sings, “I know you’re a real cuckoo” and that weird camera angle seemingly shot from under drummer Jim Macpherson’s seat.

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people on stage

Earlier this year, record label 4AD announced the long awaited release of The Breeders‘ fifth album ‘All Nerve’, out on 2nd March. It’s an album five years in the making, with work beginning after a string of shows to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their second album ‘Last Splash’. Since this is their first album release in 10 years, and marks the reunion of the ‘Last Splash’ lineup of Kim and Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs, and Jim MacPherson,

The Breeders‘ first four albums will be reissued on vinyl by 4AD next month. All of the Breeders’ previous albums  Pod, Last Splash, Title TK, and Mountain Battles – will be re-issued on vinyl on 18th May.

With their new album All Nerve released last month, The Breeders have now confirmed plans to reissue their first four albums on vinyl . The reissues will arrive via 4AD, with their debut Pod from 1990, 1993’s Last Splash, Title TK from 2002 and their last album before their extended hiatus, 2008’s Mountain Battles all the subject of the reissue plans.

The band will play a handful of shows in the UK and Ireland in late May folllowing the release of the reissues taking in dates in Belfast, Dublin, Edinburgh, Leeds and London, before returning for a further few shows in July.

The Breeders continue to tour their latest album All Nerve with further European dates announced for November.  The group will also play two shows before FYF Festival in July.  Currently on the road in North America,

Pod

Pod,

The 1990 debut featuring the line-up of Pixie’s Kim Deal, Throwing Muses’ Tanya Donelly, the Perfect Disaster’s Josephine Wiggs and Slint’s Britt Walford, was recorded by Steve Albini.  Kurt Cobain listed the record as one of his top three favourite albums saying, “the way they structure [the songs] is totally unique.”  Critically acclaimed when it came out, Pod’s legacy lives on It was “blissful mindfuck of a record,” and ranked it in their Best Albums of the 90s.

Back in 1989, and with tension mounting in the Pixies between Kim Deal and Black Francis, The Breeders‘ first demo’s were recorded between Kim and Throwing Muse‘s Tanya Donnelly after they met while touring together in their respective bands. This would lead to the release of debut album ‘Pod’ in 1990, an album which would receive critical acclaim from the music press. It’s rough, visceral, owing largely down to the simplistic production which allows the attitude with which the band play their instruments to carry through the record. No where is this more apparent than on the incredibly original interpretation of The Beatles‘ ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, a track injected with attitude here. The true strength of this album is in listening to it as a collective whole, as each song lends something to the experience. Their best was yet to come however…

Last Splash,

Recorded in 1993 by what is now regarded as the ‘classic’ Breeders line-up of Kim and Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs and Jim Macpherson.  Including the twisted pop singles ‘Cannonball’ and ‘Divine Hammer’, it has become one of the defining albums of the 90s.

What else? The Breeders‘ quintessential 1993 album ‘Last Splash’ followed on from the warped and jagged ‘Pod’ by throwing caution to the wind, producing an erratic, distorted, and yet intensely textured masterpiece of 90’s alt-rock. The results of their almost sarcastic jab at the crossover between chart success and the alt-rock/grunge movement landed Kim and the band with unexpected commercial success; ‘Last Splash’ would eventually go platinum in the United States, and lead single ‘Cannonball’ filled dance floor’s up and down the country. While ‘Cannonball’ is still their most recognisable song, ‘Last Splash’ delivers throughout, taking a number of detours along the way; ‘Invisible Man’, with it’s grinding, hazy guitar hooks and string arrangement; ‘Do You Love Me Now?’, with it’s brooding, chugging guitar in ode to feeling lovesick; and ‘Flipside’, a sub 2 minute instrumental blast of sheer joy, with a playful guitar line and copious amounts of cymbal smashing. ‘Last Splash’ presents The Breeders at their best; inventive, eccentric, effortlessly cool, and full of a vigour lost among the grunge crossover bands of the early 90’s.

Title Tk [Explicit]

Title TK

2002’s Title TK saw the band work with Steve Albini once more, with the Guardian saying it was “a welcome return to punky pop that knows how to flex some melodic muscle.”  The album has been out of print on vinyl since its release. Ending a 9 year hiatus, The Breeders came back in 2002 with ‘Title TK’, a tuneful yet melancholy and skeletal album at odds with their previous work. It drifts between different tones seemingly on a track by track basis, a little unsettled and unsure of itself, yet there are moments here of brooding which are reminiscent of early work by PJ Harvey; in the dark punk sounds of ‘Little Fury’ and ‘Son Of Three’, and in the soft ballad ‘Off You’.

On release, critics weren’t as enthralled with ‘Title TK’ as they had been with previous album ‘Last Splash’, lamenting the albums lack of creative flare and citing an unoriginal re-recording of ‘Full On Idle’ (originally recorded by Kim Deal’s other side project The Amps) as evidence of this. Retrospective listeners, however, have noted that ‘Title TK’ works more under the pretext of a concept album; a record about the absence of things, or about losing things and making do in order to move forward.

Mountain Battles

Fourth album Mountain Battles, a perfectly formed album of 13 miniatures in 36 minutes engineered by Steve Albini, was originally released in 2008.  Like Title TK before it, Mountain Battles has been out of print since its release.

Another gap followed the release of ‘Title TK’ before The Breeders were ready to release their most recent album ‘Mountain Battles’. With a more stable lineup this time around, ‘Mountain Battles’ sees progression from ‘Title TK’ in terms of attitude; it’s more optimistic, defiantly so, and finds the band willing to return to throwing in tracks from left field. ‘Istanbul’ is an understated eastern-style chant, while ‘Regalame Este Noche’ provides a hint of Spanish slow-dance to the proceedings. Although it takes a little time to warm up, ‘Mountain Battles’ is a largely successful return to the spiky, inventive sound The Breeder‘s had used so effectively during their earlier years.

All Nerve

All Nerve

The Breeders’ fifth studio album, saw the iconic line-up of Kim and Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs and Jim Macpherson reunite for the first time since the release of the platinum-selling album Last Splash. Released earlier this year, critics and fans welcomed them back with open arms and they scored their highest chart positions – including top 10 in the UK – in 25 years.

The Breeders - New European Tour Dates, Back Catalogue Vinyl Reissues

Image result for surfer rosa images

Surfer Rosa is one of those perfect debut albums, that lets you know what you’re in for right out of the gate. The blueprint for the album, and for so much of the guitar-based music that followed over the next decade or so, is set within the first minute of the lead track, “Bone Machine.” David Lovering’s spare yet ferocious drums, the sound of them so vast that you wonder if he’s actually playing an oil rig. Kim Deal’s muscular, melodic bassline, underpinning but never overstepping. Joey Santiago drawing blood out of a few crystal-sharp notes of guitar. Black Francis (aka Frank Black) yelping for sixteen bars of agitated verse over a relative lull of music before Santiago yanks the song back into a chorus of blistered lips and “uh-oh!”—the first instance of the loud/soft motif that the band further refine and recalibrate through another dozen frenetic and thrilling songs, most of which combust around the two-minute mark.

The Pixies made Surfer Rosa not long after their formation in Boston, Massachusetts, and just a few weeks after the release of their debut mini album, Come On Pilgrim. Both releases were themselves culled from a March ’87 demo, The Purple Tape, which included embryonic versions of several Surfer Rosa songs: “Break My Body,” “I’m Amazed” and the album’s most straightforwardly hardcore moment, “Broken Face.” At the urging of their British label, 4AD Records, Surfer Rosa saw the Pixies replace Purple Tape producer Gary Smith with a relatively unknown recording engineer, Steve Albini, who was best known at the time for his work with his own band, Big Black. After a get-to-know-you dinner at Lovering’s place, the band and Albini set to work on the record at the newly opened Q Division Studios in Somerville, a few miles north of Boston, which had ironically been recommended to them by the ousted Smith.

Famously opposed to both the title “producer” and the concept of receiving royalties on albums he worked on, Albini was paid a flat fee of $1,500 for his ten days of work on the album, out of a total recording budget of $10,000. He would be similarly forthright in his critiques of the band’s performances, alternately hailing them as “genius” or dismissing them entirely.

In press interviews at the time, the band would characterize Albini as a “brainiac” who loved lo-fi and instruction manuals but had little enthusiasm for “anything human-sounding”—the result of which meant that those ten days of recording were spent honing guitar and drum sounds, with vocal parts left until the very last evening. Special effects were eschewed in favor of an abrasive, unadorned—and soon to be much copied style that found its perfect foil in the Pixies’ deceptively delicate (and often delicately played) songs. Even overdubbing was generally avoided. “He hates overdubs,” Deal had told Melody Maker.

Though the two would later on form a deep friendship (as evidenced by their joint panel at this year’s SXSW festival), Deal was somewhat dismissive of Albini’s methodology in subsequent interviews. But Albini always had a fan in Black Francis. “I like him because he likes loud,” he exclaimed in the same interview. “All the needles were on red. He totally overloaded the tape.”

Assistant engineer John Lupner, meanwhile, was struck by the lengths Albini went to authentically capture the particular sound of Q Division Studios. Not everything was quite so meticulously planned, however. According to John Murphy—Deal’s husband at the time—the abrupt end to “Where Is My Mind?” came about by accident, as a result of the tape running out while the band was playing. “The tape started to go click click click,” he told Frank and Ganz, “and they went, ‘Well, we got most of it.

If there’s an overarching theme to Surfer Rosa, it’s a Lynchian scratching away at the underbelly of modern life to reveal tales of voyeurism, incest, and other deviant behavior. Francis put these preoccupations—that include a rather ahead-of-its-time portrayal, in “Bone Machine,” of a pedophile priest (or “preachy-preach” in Pixies vernacular)—down to his “real hardcore Pentecostal” upbringing. It’s not all about molestation, though. Two songs (“Broken Body” and “Tony’s Theme”) reference superheroes, while several others draw on a six-month period Francis spent as an exchange student in Puerto Rico the inspiration for both the Spanglish lyrics in “Vamos” and “Where Is My Mind?” with its dreamy evocation of snorkeling “in the Car-ibb-e-an.”

Though vocals were left until the final day of recording, they were by no means an afterthought. Indeed, the interplay between the band’s two vocalists, Francis and Deal, would become another Pixies trademark. In keeping with his vérité style, Albini abandoned studio trickery in favor of natural acoustics. Deal’s two most memorable vocal performances—her lead on the bouncing, pop-toned single, “Gigantic” and the oo-oohs that run throughout “Where Is My Mind?”—were recorded in the bathroom, its natural echo proving preferable, as far as Albini was concerned, to any available studio effect. The latter song’s false start jarring and seemingly throwaway on first listen is instructive as to the attention to detail from both band and engineer. Deal’s first ooh, which precedes Francis’s curt instruction to “Stop,” has a sharp rawness to it. When her voice returns in the song proper, it’s engulfed in an underwater haze much more befitting the lyrical reverie.

There are further spoken interjections elsewhere: some within the songs, such as the aforementioned opening to “Bone Machine” and Deal’s similar announcement that “Tony’s Theme” is about “a superhero named Tony,” and some in between. “I’m Amazed” begins with Deal mid-sentence, gossiping about a teacher who’s “into field-hockey players.” “Oh My Golly!” ends with Francis yelling “You fuckin’ die!” at her. He goes on to clarify that he’d done so in jest, in response to her warning that no one mess with her equipment.

Surfer Rosa was released in March 1988 in the UK and remained available only as an import in the United States until late summer, when 4AD signed a North American distribution deal with Rough Trade. Initial U.S. pressings paired the album with Come On Pilgrim. The two works were then reissued separately in 1992, after Elektra Records took on the 4AD catalogue.

Having received largely positive press notices, Surfer Rosa sold solidly in the interim, if unspectacularly—perhaps in part because, like so many landmark albums, it found itself a little far ahead of the curve. Winning the hearts and minds of college radio and Melody Maker (which named the album the best of 1988) would not yet yield widespread success. The album did not go gold in the U.S. until 2005, by which time the Pixies had disbanded, lain dormant for a decade, and then reunited for the first of several deservedly lucrative world tours.

By then, of course, Surfer Rosa had been well and truly canonized as one of the most influential albums of its time, with Nirvana and myriad others taking the Rosa model and running with it, many of them queuing up both to sing its praises and to summon Steve Albini to work his magic to record his own band’s album In Utero . Kurt Cobain listed it as his second favorite album of all time (after Iggy and the Stooges’ Raw Power)

Among the earliest advocates for the band, meanwhile, was one of rock’s greatest statesmen, David Bowie, who would later lament, “I thought it was a hell of a shame that America didn’t recognize its own with the Pixies.” His 2002 album Heathen includes a well-judged cover of Rosa’s “Cactus,” a short and sweet ballad about a prisoner so desperate for something—anything from his wife that he ends up begging her to smear her dress with blood and “send it to meeee.”

Another important step in the album’s elevation came a few years earlier, with David Fincher’s clever use of “Where Is My Mind?” in a pivotal scene toward the end of Fight Club. Since then, that song in particular has become so inescapable that you’ll even hear gentle piano renditions in HBO prestige dramas. Surfer Rosa regularly appears on all-time “best-of” lists online and in print.

Pixies
  • Black Francis – vocals, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar
  • Kim Deal – bass, backing vocals, vocals on “Gigantic” (credited as Mrs. John Murphy)
  • Joey Santiago – lead guitar
  • David Lovering – drums
No automatic alt text available.
‘All Nerve’ – the first new album from The Breeders in a decade – reunites band members Kim and Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs and Jim Macpherson, the lineup behind the iconic and platinum-selling record, ‘Last Splash’.
The quartet returned to the stage in 2013 to celebrate the album’s 20th anniversary and have been quietly working on new material since then.
Featuring the tracks ‘Wait In The Car’ and title track ‘All Nerve’, recording took place at Candyland, Dayton, Kentucky, with Mike Montgomery; Electrical Audio, Chicago, with Steve Albini and Greg Norman; and with Tom Rastikis at Fernwood Studios, Dayton, Ohio.
Artwork was conceived by Chris Bigg, who has worked with The Breeders since their first album, ‘Pod’. ‘All Nerve’ is released on CD and 180g black vinyl with digital download card. It’s also available to us pressed on 180g orange vinyl with alternate artwork and digital download code. Released via 4AD Records.

‘All Nerve’, the new album by The Breeders, will be released on March 2nd 2018 on 4AD Records.

The album is available on standard black vinyl, indie-exclusive orange vinyl (w/ alternative cover), CD and digital services. It is available to pre-order now. Bundle options are available from the band and 4AD, including the final ‘Wait In The Car’ 7” and t-shirts:

 Tracklist:
1.Nervous Mary
2.Wait In The Car
3.All Nerve
4.MetaGoth
5.Spacewoman
6.Walking With A Killer
7.Howl At The Summit
8.Archangel’s Thunderbird
9.Dawn: Making An Effort
10.Skinhead #2
11.Blues At The Acropolis
No automatic alt text available.

Breeders All Nerve Art.jpg

American alternative-rock heroes The Breeders have announced the details of their first new album in 10 years, “All Nerve”, out on March. 2nd,

The band’s classic lineup of Kim and Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs and Jim Macpherson will return for their new album. The Breeders returned to the stage in 2013 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their LP, Last Splash, and have been working on new material since then. A 2018 album release was confirmed back in November.

Lead All Nerve single “Wait in the Car,” released back in October, is a vindictive alternative-punk track featuring The Breeders’ trademark bratty lead vocals and a “Teenage Kicks”-like guitar riff. “All Nerve” itself is a dynamic track that ping-pongs between subdued verses and crunching choruses.

Revisit “Wait in the Car” and check out venues for The Breeders’ world tour dates.

The Breeders have released two albums since the turn of the century, but their forthcoming record will be the first made with the lineup of Kim Deal, Kelley Deal, Josephine Wiggs and Jim McPherson since 1993’s Last Splash. They recruited Steve Albini to help out recording drums on a few tracks, and the album promises to feature a contribution from Courtney Barnett, too. If last year’s raucous “Wait in the Car” is any indication of what to expect, it should be a good time.

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people on stage

The Breeders are back. You can watch the lyric video to their latest track, “Wait in the Car,” is their first new music since 2009’s Fate to Fatal EP, with their last full-length, Mountain Battles, came out the year before that. However, it’s not, as of now, scheduled for inclusion on an upcoming album

The barely two-minute track opens up with the sounds found on that tweet, some power chords followed by Kim Deal shouting, “Good morning!” Its video was directed by Chris Bigg and Martin Andersen, who created the video out of 800 still images.

The song will be released on three separated colored vinyl 7-inch singles. Fans attending their upcoming tour will be able to purchase an orange vinyl copy backed with a cover of Amon Düül II’s “Archangel’s Thunderbird” that they recorded with Steve Albini. Then on October 27th, a yellow vinyl version, with their take on Devo‘s “Gates of Steel” as the b-side, will arrive in select independent record shops. They have yet to announce details for the third single, a red vinyl 45 with a cover of Michael Nesmith’s “Joanne” on the flip side. Pressings of all three will be limited to 1,500 copies.

The Breeders are: Kim Deal (vocals and guitar); Kelley Deal (guitar and vocals); Jim Macpherson (drums); Josephine Wiggs (bass). They are currently recording a new album.

The Breeders will head to Europe for two weeks before returning home to open a pair of shows for Arcade Fire. Then, they’ll begin a headlining tour of the U.S. in November.

A brilliant debut single of lilting folk-rock concealing a bleak heart and featuring the hushed vocals of none other than Kim Deal of the Pixies.

Having previously worked as a songwriter around France, London and Dublin, Mark McCambridge played his first show as ARBORIST in early February 2013, opening for James Yorkston in Belfast. A solo tour of Ireland followed before impressive performances led to notable support slots alongside Low, Cat Power, Mark Mulcahy and Alasdair Roberts.

Now based out of Belfast and surrounded by a band of well-travelled musicians, Arborist’s music is measured and mature while remaining starkly modern. Centred around McCambridge’s soaring vocal and unique lyrical style, it speaks of bleak truths (Leonard Cohen, Bill Callahan, Jason Molina) but delivers them with an assured soulfulness (Sam Cooke, Al Green).

“Twisted Arrow” is their new single and features the unmistakable harmonies of Kim Deal. Her hushed and plaintive vocal adds weight to a familial tale of detachment and is the perfect counterpoint to McCambridge’s sharp delivery. It was recorded during dark winter nights in Belfast and Dayton, Ohio – the latter as the new year arrived – and you can feel it in the lyrical violin and lean, crisp production.

Twisted Arrow was released as a limited edition 7″ vinyl .

“This guy’s a master songwriter..his muse is an earth-bound one – full of scruffy moments and care-worn emotional truths. His development will be one of the most intriguing story strands of the year.”

http://