Posts Tagged ‘Joyful Noise Recordings’

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No Joy has revisited and reinvented some of her favourite tracks from her 2020 album Motherhood for the new EP Can My Daughter See Me From Heaven? It sees principal songwriter Jasamine White-Gluz mining and exploring fresh avenues, bringing you an orchestral interpretation of choice tracks. Once again pulling sonically from every corner she’s mastered before — including nu metal, trip hop, and shoegaze — the five-song EP shows White-Gluz settling into a strange and confident harmony.

Highlighting the urgency of Motherhood while continuing to find formidable shapes of reinvention, the EP defies expectation and genre, cementing No Joy as something rare: A band without a category.”

Can My Daughter See Me From Heaven?” the new album feat. orchestral reimaginings of your fave songs from Motherhood (and one Deftones cover!) First single “Kidder (from Heaven)” is out now, video directed by 7 year old Sloan. Recorded entirely in remote, these songs feature harp by Nailah Hunter, Cello by Ouri, French Horn/Opera and Backing Vocals by Brandi Sidoryk, drums by Sarah Thawer and tons of guitars by none other than Tara McLeod.

Produced by moi & Tara, Mixed by Jorge Elbrecht and mastered by Heba Kadry.Available on Digital, Blue Glitter Cassette, and Limited ‘Mood Ring Coffin’ Cassette – these are limited to just 100 hand-numbered copies that I’m hand painting my gddamn self!!!This was a challenging, experimental journey that sounds like nothing I’ve ever done before and I’m so proud of it.

Jasamine White-Gluz (vocals, producer) Tara Mcleod (co-producer/guitar) Ouri (cello) ​ Nailah Hunter (harp) Sarah Thawson (drums) Brandi Sidoryk (french horn, opera and backup vocals)

“Kidder – From Heaven” by No Joy off the EP ‘Can My Daughter See Me From Heaven’ out 5/19/2021 on Joyful Noise Recordings worldwide, out on Hand Drawn Dracula in Canada.

Two years ago, SoCal studio cultist Chris Schlarb, a.k.a. Psychic Temple, announced a new project in which he would collaborate with four completely different artists for each side of a double album. He called it “Houses of the Holy”  which made sense, coming after albums titled I, II, III, and IV — and introduced it with a fun EP of desert-singed garage-pop tunes made with Los Angeles’ Cherry Glazerr. The full 2-LP adventure, rolled out this last September, features those songs plus some jazzier moods with cornetist Rob Mazurek’s Chicago Underground trio; along with paisley-hued psychedelic rock with the Dream Syndicate; and big-band backpack rap with local MC Xololanxinxo.

All those sounds hang together with the logic of a long, weird dream, thanks to Schlarb’s instinct for unlikely musical connections. As a generous celebration of what can happen when you put a bunch of talented people together in one room — in this case, Schlarb’s Long Beach, California, studio, Big Ego  “Houses of the Holy” was all the more welcome this lonely year.

The concept is pretty cool. Basically, I take over an existing band on each side and we write and record together.
Cherry Glazerr (Side A)
Chicago Underground Trio (Side B)
Dream Syndicate (SideC)
Xololanxinxo (Side D)
 
Psychic Temple - Houses of the Holy
 
The first single, “Why Should I Wait?” with The Dream Syndicate is out now and you can pre-order the album over at Bandcamp today. I’m really proud of this record. If you take a listen, please let me know what you think. The vinyl is especially fun since each side is its own thing, but together its like the album is a mini box set. “Lightning” I particularly keep playing. It makes me feel like it could have been a song in an old old dream I had trouble remembering until I hear it and I can almost recall it again. Give the album a good listen and I think you’ll find something to enjoy.

Psychic Temple off the album ‘Houses of the Holy’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings.

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A standout example of Motherhood’s multiplicity is track four, “Four” (natch), which Jasamine White-Gluz called “perhaps my favourite No Joy song ever written.” Hypnotic electronic guitar notes buzz and bend, slowly multiplying into a dull roar of feedback punctuated only by piano and handclaps, like 90 seconds of a high-tension wire being pulled tight to the point of snapping—and just when you think it’s about to break, all that pressure just evaporates, with a serene trip-hop beat bubbling up in its place. Of course, it’s not long before that cathartic groove transforms, in turn, into a hard-nosed, post-punk instrumental, its caustic guitars swelling and receding like a pair of black lungs clinging to life.

“Four” by No Joy off the album ‘Motherhood’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings (world) & Handdrawn Dracula in Canada.

For over a decade, Montreal’s Suuns have been formulating a mixture of krautrock, jazz, post-punk, and noise rock, resulting in atmospheric and enthralling compositions. But after releasing and touring 2018’s Felt, founding member Max Henry departed the group in order to pursue a scholastic path, setting off a series of massive changes. The rest of the group—singer Ben Shemie, drummer Liam O’Neill, and guitarist Joseph Yarmush—underwent an experimental metamorphosis, performing with various pals to see who could fill Henry’s place.

“We would try new stuff out as it’s coming in on tour, or during shows, to test out some things,” Shemie explains, calling from Paris. “That was much more difficult because we were trying different people out to play. That made the whole process a lot more arduous in terms of having to learn all this material that the three of us knew so well, and then try to teach it to new people,” O’Neill, calling from the other side of the Atlantic in Montreal, chimes in. “At this point we’d been working so long together, it’s second nature in a way. It’s a place where you can navigate the creative process. It’s not a thing you can ever teach. You have to experience that.”

For a band whose live shows are integral to their process and development of ideas, a global pandemic forced them to rework a release schedule that had become somewhat routine over the past decade. “In the history of our band, and for most working bands, you’re on this hamster wheel the whole time,” O’Neill says. “You’re working and doing that endless cycle of recording and touring and then recording again.” After finding keyboard replacement Mathieu Charbonneau, Suuns were preparing to release and tour their fifth album this year, which COVID halted; the hamster wheel broke.

In lieu of Felt’s follow-up, they’ve released two live albums to commemorate the departure of Henry, and a remix album of their breakthrough 2013 single “2020.” Their latest offering to tide us over until next year’s full-length is a six-track EP, composed of some older reworked tracks and a few newer songs that didn’t make the forthcoming album. It’s their most diverse collection yet, with bits of ambient noise, bouncing hip-hop inflections, and bursts of processional drums. We chatted about how Fiction creatively energized the band and made them rethink their process. 

Suuns off ‘Fiction EP’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings (World) & Secret City Records (Canada).

Chicago duo Ohmme was started by Macie Stewart and Sima Cunningham in the summer of 2014, combining their love for lush vocals and song writing with their love of experimentation and sound. Ohmme founders Sima and Macie and their drummer, Matt Carroll, were supposed to hit the road in April opening for Waxahatchee, ahead of the June 5 release of “Fantasize Your Ghost” on Joyful Noise Recordings. Cunningham, 30, and Stewart, 27, are nimble multi-instrumentalists and arresting singers, and they’ve collaborated widely throughout Chicago’s sprawling music communities, playing with artists working in rock, hip-hop, classical, folk, country, jazz, noise, and more. Between them they’ve worked with the likes of Chance the Rapper, Tortoise, Jeff Tweedy, and Twin Peaks.

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In the months since COVID-19 shut down the live-music ecosystem, Ohmme have played several online sets, sometimes sharing a room and sometimes remotely, including as part of Goose Island’s 312unes series and the Dr. Martens Presents: Stay In series

There’s obvious chemistry emanating throughout Ohmme’s music that’s so tangible it can only come from a decades-spanning friendship. Songwriters Sima Cunningham and Macie Stewart formed their unbreakable bond performing throughout the fringes of Chicago’s many interlocking communities, collaborating with titans from the city’s indie rock, hip-hop, and improvised worlds. The two formed Ohmme in 2014 as an outlet to explore an unconventional approach to their instruments. “That’s the whole genesis of the band: us walking up to our guitars and saying, ‘how can we make this noisemaker do something different?’” says Cunningham. Their 2016 self-titled debut EP took these experiments live and showcased the band’s vocal interplay that is another key to their songs. The full-length follow up, Parts, found the duo adding a drummer, Matt Carroll, and expanding their sound; Spin wrote: “Ohmme’s aesthetic universe has the cramped intimacy of a small rehearsal space, and they are its masters. Anything they can squeeze inside—swirling baroque vocal melodies, punchy punk power chords, three-minute rockers and dreamlike chamber-pop suites—ends up sounding like Ohmme.” Their latest album, Fantasize Your Ghost, was released in June of 2020 and found the band featured in outlets such as Premier Guitar and Uncut with songs that capture more closely the band’s live show

released October 12th, 2020 Sub Pop Records

Fantasize Your Ghost

Sima Cunnningham and Macie Stewart of Ohmme make average rock bands sound unimaginative and unremarkable—while most bands are happy just rolling a hoop with a stick, Ohmme are reinventing said hoops, but they have far too much humility to ever point out that discrepancy. The band’s new album “Fantasize Your Ghost” follows 2018’s Parts, and it shows off the Chicago duo’s strengths: writing fascinatingly experimental songs with surprising accessibility and braiding their voices to a staggering effect.

Both musicians are classically trained, and their live shows prominently feature their raucous violin and guitar slinging as well as their unique artistic vision. Their forthcoming album opens with the wonderfully puzzling riff of “Flood Your Gut,” followed by the seraphic vocal harmonies and guitar bleed of “Selling Candy,” and right away, you know you’re on a sonically and artistically fruitful path. Another highlight is “3 2 4 3,” where colossal strings meet their astounding vocal might and subtle yet effective guitar lines.

Official Video for “3 2 4 3” by Ohmme off the album ‘Fantasize Your Ghost’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings.

Songwriters Sima Cunnningham and Macie Stewart formed their unbreakable bond performing throughout the fringes of Chicago’s many interlocking communities, collaborating with titans from the city’s indie rock, hip-hop, and improvised worlds. but together, along with drummer Matt Carroll, they’ve stretched the boundaries of what guitar music can do starting with the band’s experimental 2016 self-titled EP and their adventurous debut 2018 LP parts. now their longstanding partnership culminates with the stunning and muscular follow-up fantasize your ghost.

Ohmme formed in 2014 as an outlet for Cunningham and Stewart to explore an unconventional approach to their instruments. “that’s the whole genesis of the band: us walking up to our guitars and saying, ‘how can we make this noisemaker do something different?'” says Cunningham. but as their musical collaboration strengthened, bringing parts and intensive tours with acts like Wilco, Iron & Wine, Twin Peaks, and more, the band’s scope and focus has also broadened. “grinding on tour last year for so long, it can alter your mental state where you have to think about your life in a different way than you would if you’re home. a lot of the songs stemmed from just thinking about all of the possibilities that life could be and could take,” says Stewart. the commanding single “3 2 4 3” tackles the terrifying realization of needing to make a change. their deft scene-setting and the way their disparate voices blend together heightens the song’s inherent anxiety.

These moments of emotional clarity fill fantasize your ghost. written across 2019, early sketches of the album’s tracklist were demoed at Sam Evian’s Flying Cloud studios in upstate New York. “that’s where we really started to see the record come together,” says Cunningham. the sessions were intensely collaborative and open, the product of long, existential conversations between Stewart and Cunningham in the van about their lives and how to channel the anger they were feeling about the state of the world. tracks like the driving opener “Flood Your Gut” underwent several revisions with Ohmme uncovering several new directions the song could go before finishing it. fantasize your ghost was recorded over a six day session in with indie rock journeyman producer Chris Cohen and captures the astounding magnetism and ferocity of their live show. Fantasize your ghost encapsulates the thrilling and sometimes terrifying joy of moving forward even if you don’t know where you’re going. it’s an album that asks necessary questions: when life demands a crossroads, what version of yourself are you going to pursue? what part of yourself will you feed and let flourish and what do you have to let go of? this is a record of strength, of best friends believing in each other. unapologetic and brave, Ohmme are ready to figure it all out together.

Ohmme off their album ‘Fantasize Your Ghost’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings.

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I have listened to the album “Fantasize Your Ghost” a fair few times since I got a hold of it. The word that always pops into my mind is filthy. Sima Cunningham and Macie Steware are classically trained but refuse to be hemmed in by any construct. They are relentlessly ambitious in their music but it always comes across as human and authentic. Still in their 20s, Stewart and Cunningham are both classically trained musicians and are established players within the Chicago music scene. They are especially involved in performing and working for venues within the local experimental music scene. They’re constant collaborators and have recorded and toured with homegrown acts as varied as Tweedy, Whitney, Chance The Rapper and Twin Peaks.

I dug their debut, Parts, but this is a lovely leap forward. It’s almost as if that after a year of touring around playing Parts; they were like, We’re pretty good at this music stuff. Let’s kick it up notch.” The second track, Selling Candy, is just stupid good.

“The band started because we knew we could sing well together and we wanted to make some noise with the guitar,” says Cunningham. Stewart elaborates, “Sima and I are both trained classical pianists and we know many of the sonic spaces keyboards have to offer. Since we were interested in experimenting and creating something different from what we had both done in the past, we chose guitar as our outlet for this band. We wanted to create both new and uncomfortable parameters for ourselves to force us into a different creative space.” These guitar-heavy experiments are sometimes earthy and resounding, at other times shimmering and buzzing—swirling around the duo’s expertly crafted vocals while creating a chaotic bed of harmony. Cunningham’s smoky alto complements Stewart’s higher-register croon, all underpinned by the restrained yet highly inventive polyrhythmic percussion of drummer Matt Carroll.

They laid this art-pop tune on top of a scuzzy blues garage tune. They guitars are riffs you’ve probably heard a million times before but they just turn the whole thing on its end. Simply brilliant stuff. 3 2 4 3 builds of an entrancing Cosmic Americana riff that reminds me of Steve Gunn. The second half sees the tune slowly goes on as if you’ve fallen into a hole that goes on forever.

The tracks range from sweetly shiny 2-minute hypnotic bangers to woozy and sprawling 7-minute long tracks boasting moodily atmospheric wafting guitars and piercing feedback shows a band colliding thoughtfulness and creative ingenuity to produce music as unique as it is earworm-worthy.
Band Members:
Macie Stewart
Sima Cunningham

“Ghost” from Ohmme off their album ‘Fantasize Your Ghost’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings.

Hailed indie-rock duo Ohmme as both a Chicago band to know and an outstanding live act, so you could say we’re pleased to report they’ve announced a new album, the follow-up to their 2018 debut Parts. Fantasize Your Ghost, coming June 5th via Joyful Noise Recordings, is preceded by lead single “3 2 4 3,” which arrives alongside an arresting music video somewhat reminiscent of Jordan Peele’s Us. Stewart and Cunningham are both classically trained musicians and are established players within the Chicago music scene. They are especially involved in performing and working for venues within the local experimental music scene. They’re constant collaborators and have recorded and toured with homegrown acts as varied as Tweedy, Whitney, Chance The Rapper and Twin Peaks.

Cunningham and Stewart are multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriters with a penchant for two instruments in particular. “The band started because we knew we could sing well together and we wanted to make some noise with the guitar,” says Cunningham. Stewart elaborates, “Sima and I are both trained classical pianists and we know many of the sonic spaces keyboards have to offer. Since we were interested in experimenting and creating something different from what we had both done in the past, we chose guitar as our outlet for this band. We wanted to create both new and uncomfortable parameters for ourselves to force us into a different creative space.” These guitar-heavy experiments are sometimes earthy and resounding, at other times shimmering and buzzing—swirling around the duo’s expertly crafted vocals while creating a chaotic bed of harmony. Cunningham’s smoky alto complements Stewart’s higher-register croon, all underpinned by the restrained yet highly inventive polyrhythmic percussion of drummer Matt Carroll. Think Amber Coffman and Angel Deradoorian-era Dirty Projectors.
Band Members
Macie Stewart
Sima Cunningham

Official Video for “3 2 4 3” by Ohmme off the album ‘Fantasize Your Ghost’ out on Joyful Noise Recordings.

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Lillie West knows that sometimes you have to look back to move forward. West, who records as Lala Lala on SubPop imprint Hardly Art, has, in her music, confronted the kind of trauma that can inspire self-destruction or, hopefully, self-reflection: a home invasion and subsequent paranoia; toxic relationships; battles with addiction; and the deaths of several close friends, to name a few.

On “Siren 042,” the Chicago-based singer-songwriter collaborates with WHY? founder Yoni Wolf to examine the guilt that trickles in after ignoring your better judgment — the particular sensation of seeing problems or hazards on the horizon but proceeding anyway. “There was a siren ringing in my head,” sings West on the chorus. “But I wasn’t listening, so I did what I did.”

“Siren 042” is written by Yoni Wolf of WHY? and Lillie West of Lala Lala.

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Hailing from Cincinnati in the heart of the mid-west, The Ophelias are a collision of musical backgrounds, incorporating everything from garage-rock to opera. What brought them together was a desire to not be the token girl in, “dude-bands”. The resultant album, Almost, is a celebration of not being sidelined, of embracing the limelight and revelling in a freedom from censorship.

Ahead of dates with WHY? and the brilliant Lala Lala, The Ophelia’s have this week shared a brand new video to one of their album’s finest moments, Moon Like Sour Candy. The track is one of the more laid back offerings on the record; muted guitar strums give-way to pulsing synth bass, rich violins and twinkling electronics, all added to the melancholy vocal delivery. There’s a touch of the bedroom pop of Frankie Cosmos or early Waxahatchee. Proof, were it needed, that you don’t need to make a racket to have a huge impact, Moon Like Sour Candy is an understated triumph.

Almost is out now via Joyful Noise Recordings.

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