Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Bolt’

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Allison Crutchfield, Kyle Gilbride, and Jeff Bolt were just getting started when Swearin’ first called it quits. But then they said fuck all that and made something new. When Swearin’ broke up in 2015, they left a lot more broken hearts in their wake than just those of their central members (the band’s initial split coincided with the dissolution of a romantic relationship between singer/guitarists Allison Crutchfield and Kyle Gilbride). The Philadelphia group’s fuzzy, basement-bred take on pop-punk—situated somewhere between Cub, Pixies, Helium, and The Thermals, with a little Mascis-fried guitar tossed in for good measure  meant quite a bit to many people, and few of them were ready to give it up so fast.

Luckily, neither was the band. After taking some time and space for themselves—which, for Crutchfield, meant a move to Los Angeles, touring as a member of her sister Katie’s similarly beloved band Waxahatchee, and putting out a solo record under her given name; for Gilbride, engineering/producing for acts such as All Dogs and GirlpoolSwearin’ have decided to get the gang back together, reuniting with original drummer Jeff Bolt, and bringing on a new touring bassist, All Dogs’ Amanda Bartley, who is now an official member of the group. Their new record, Fall into the Sun, finds the band more confident than ever, and just the slightest bit tidier, too—though nobody’s going to mistake their rough-hewn, homemade sound for Carly Rae Jepsen just yet (or ever, if they’re true to the ethos outlined on the following pages).

Swearin’ chat between two shows in Portland (both opening for another band that people were stoked to see back together: Jawbreaker) to get up to speed on all their new doings.

Allison Crutchfield:  said that It gave me a lot more confidence. When Swearin’ stopped doing things, I immediately decided to focus on solo stuff, without giving much thought to how that would be different. When you’re the center of something, though, everyone’s looking to you for answers, everyone’s asking you questions, you’re making the production choices… It was really exciting for me, even though I like collaborating a lot.

But it was also really anxiety-inducing. That made me excited to do Swearin’ again, just for the pure “oh, yes, I don’t have to do everything by myself!” factor. We’re a team that makes decisions together.

I think the distance, for each of us, was also good. In the first iteration of the band, we were touring together all the time, living together, and everything was very intertwined. Not doing that for a while, all of that’s sort of been untangled. Now we’re adults who don’t spend all of our time together, and we actually have new things to share when we see each other.

Jeff Bolt added At the end of the first version [of the band], Kyle and Allison were still dating, and three-fourths of us were living together, so it was a lot to handle. Having a new bass player, who’s bringing a new energy to it. Amanda’s made it more positive for the rest of us, but also having her in the band has made us want to be on our best behavior so we don’t scare her away, even though she’s an old friend!

Whether it was intentional or not, we just kind of picked up where we left off, and we were both thinking about the time and space between.This album sounds the slightest bit crisper than previous efforts. This record was actually recorded the exact same way as our other records: at home, with Kyle engineering and co-producing. If anything, I think the difference is just that it’s been five years since we’ve done a record, and Kyle has gotten better at recording.

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Swearin' to Release New Album This Year, Share North American Tour Dates

Philadelphia-based indie-rock band Swearin’, featuring Allison Crutchfield, Kyle Gilbride, Jeff Bolt and Amanda Bartley, will release their first new music since 2013’s Surfing Strange this year.

The band recently played their first live shows in three years, opening for Superchunk on tour in the northeast U.S. Swearin’ have now signed a record deal with Merge Records and are set to release a new album later this year.

Gilbride said of the band’s reunion, forthcoming album and recent record deal:

If time were real, it would have healed our wounds, but it’s not, so we decided to make a rock record. And to make one the way we always have! Quickly, at home, and for no one in particular. Fortunately for us, Merge hadn’t dismissed us as an oddity from earlier in the decade and said, “sup with that record?”And with their help, we’ve been reintroduced to polite society. Sometimes a band takes on a life of its own, and it seems this one came back to us when it was ready, and in its new form, to stay for the foreseeable future.

The band also announced a new joint tour with Mike Krol in August on the West Coast, Swearin’ will play a pair of U.S. shows with Ought in as well.

Their record label, Merge, hinted that fans should stay tuned for upcoming Swearin’ news by following the band on Facebook and by following Allison Crutchfield on Instagram, too. after releasing two beloved full-lengths, 2012’s Swearin’ and 2013’s Surfing Strange, the Philadelphian band quietly put things on hold.

It was due, at least in part, to the band’s main songwriters, Allison Crutchfield and Kyle Gilbride, ending their romantic relationship. but when the band found themselves in a room again years later, the conversation turned back to Swearin’. “without any hesitation or inhibitions,” said Crutchfield, “we asked, ‘what would it take from each of us? what would we want to accomplish if we decided to be a band again?’” they realized that what they all wanted was to not just play shows, but to make a new record. they wanted to do something that reflected the people they’d become during those intervening years. before long, Crutchfield and Gilbride had a new batch of Swearin’ songs, ones that meshed with the sound they’d originally developed together but boldly pushed things forward. Fall Into the Sun is a Swearin’ record that doesn’t try to obscure the passage of time but instead embraces it. “getting older, your tastes change, and what you want to do changes,” said Bolt. that can be seen in songs like “big change,” where Crutchfield says goodbye to Philly and the scene that she came up in, or in “dogpile,” where Gilbride offers the line any aging punk can relate to: “by pure dumb luck i’ve gotten where i’m going.” “there was a lot on our minds, and it was a super fertile time to put a bunch of songs together,” said Gilbride. it’s true of the material found on Fall Into the Sun, but it’s noticeable in the album’s production, too. much like the band’s previous albums, Gilbride anchored the recording and producing of the record, but this time around, the band worked to make the process feel more collaborative than ever before. “i feel like this was the first time i could look at a Swearin’ record and say that i co-produced it, and that felt really good,” said Crutchfield. Listening to Fall Into the Sun, Swearin’ is a more confident, collaborative version than the one people first came to know.

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Released October 5th, 2018
Swearin’ is
Jeff Bolt 
Kyle Gilbride 
Allison Crutchfield 

All songs written by Allison Crutchfield and Kyle Gilbride

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing

Indie rockers Swearin’ are due to release their first album in five years, “Fall Into the Sun”. In 2015, the band split and singer/guitarist Allison Crutchfield released her debut solo album, Tourist in This Town, last year. Following the release of their 2012 self-titled debut and 2013’s Surfing Strange, Swearin’ are back with perhaps their most riveting and urgent work so far. “After breaking up the band for several years, Crutchfield and co-singer-guitarist Kyle Gilbride, alongside drummer Jeff Bolt, have reunited for their third, and most fully realized, record to date,”  “On eleven songs that blend the newly energized band’s Nineties punk foundation with classic rock riffs and newfound singer-songwriter sincerity, the band interweaves a multi-layered, moving narrative of hurt, aging, and reconciliation that draws its energy from the narrative tension between Crutchfield and Gilbride’s starkly different songwriting styles.

“Untitled (LA),” is a spunky and rousing slice of guitar-pop, “Grow Into a Ghost” is a punchy, fuzzy jab of punk. “Anyway” is an introspective, inquisitive acoustic ballad. And “Future Hell” is one of the most animated mid-tempo jams you’ll hear this year. The lyrics that make up Fall Into The Sun approach touching, intimate and nostalgic storytelling with such care and the peppy, dynamic riffs, earnest vocals and pounding rhythm section will keep you dancing all night long

Here’s Fogelnest on how the collaboration came to be:

Allison wanted to do two videos that were somehow connected to each other. I’ve always been a huge William Castle fan, and I thought it would be fun to shoot the “Grow into a Ghost” video using his Illusion-O gimmick. The “ghost viewers” people were given to watch his film 13 Ghosts in 1960 were nothing more than modified anaglyph 3D glasses. So, that opened the door to shoot the “Future Hell” video 3D, too. The red and blue glasses would connect the two videos.

It’s awesome Merge sent out 3D glasses to people who pre-ordered the album, but even cooler that you can pick them up at record stores. It’s like when they used to show 3D movies on TV in the ‘80s and you’d get your glasses at Wawa or 7-Eleven. The videos also look cool if you don’t have glasses, but hopefully people will be inspired to hunt down a pair for the full experience.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing

In its most direct form, pop punk tends to deal in immediate emotional states, a megaphone blaring about the here and now. But Swearin’ has a more complicated relationship with time. After putting out two lean albums in 2012 and 2013, they slipped into hibernation and return now with a song about the uncanny perspective granted by growing older. “Grow Into a Ghost,” is the first single from the band’s forthcoming Fall Into the Sun LP, pounds with the kind of urgency you might expect in a song about confused youth, even though its lyrics concern a hard, long look at the past.

Allison Crutchfield sings about the phenomenon of drifting away from someone who used to play a huge role in your life—a scenario that could fit into a somber, wistful tune, but has more wallop amid Swearin’s bright, crunchy guitars and pounding drums. “I hang out with old friends/And they unknowingly remind me/Of who I was before we met,” she sings over insistent scrapes of bass. At the chorus, which ranks among the catchiest Swearin’ has written, she repeats the phrase “I watch you” until the words start to jumble together. The phrase is lodged inside a question“Will I watch you grow into a ghost?”—but the incessant repetition of those three words implies that Crutchfield has already answered it as she peers back over the years. A thundering return, “Grow Into a Ghost” crystallizes Swearin’s skill for headbanging away the thoughts that might leave another band hanging their heads.

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releases October 5th, 2018

Swearin’ is
Jeff Bolt
Kyle Gilbride
Allison Crutchfield

All songs written by Allison Crutchfield (Domino Publishing Company [BMI]) and Kyle Gilbride