Posts Tagged ‘Hey Joe’

Patti Smith

Piss Factory” is a proto punk song written by Patti Smith and band member Richard Sohl, and released as a B-side on Smith’s debut single  “Hey Joe” in 1974. Tom Verlaine of Television contributes guitar playing on “Hey Joe”. It was included on the New Wave compilation album released on Vertigo Records in 1977, and the Just Say Yesterday Sire Records 1992 compilation album , and later reissued on the rarities compilation Land 1975-2002-2002). Recorded at the Electric Lady Studios in June 5th 1974.

In 1989, Rolling Stone writer and biographer Dave Marsh placed the song on the list of The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made.

The song originated as a poem written by Patti Smith about the time she spent working in a baby buggy factory, expressing her assurance that she would not let the experience kill her ambitions.

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On this day February 2nd in 1977: although New York City ‘punk poet’ Patti Smith was signed to the Arista label, Sire Records secured the rights to release a rarity that predated the Arista contract; the lost classic was her 1974 recording of “Hey Joe” and the B side “Piss Factory”; the single was released on this day in a special limited edition picture sleeve; playing on the recording were current sidemen Lenny Kaye and Richard Sohl, with the added attraction of Television guitarist/vocalist Tom Verlaine

Honey, the way you play guitar makes me feel so, makes me feel so masochistic. The way you go down low deep into the neck and I would do anything, and I would do anything and Patty Hearst, you’re standing there in front of the Symbionese Liberation Army flag with your legs spread, I was wondering will you get it every night from a black revolutionary man and his women or whether you really did and now that you’re on the run what goes on in your mind, your sisters they sit by the window, you know your mama doesn’t sit and cry and your daddy, well you know what your daddy said, Patty, you know what your daddy said, Patty, he said, he said, he said, “Well, sixty days ago she was such a lovely child, now here she is with a gun in her hand.”

Hey Joe
Hey Joe, where’re you going with that gun in your hand ?
Hey Joe, I said where’re you goin’ with that gun in your hand
I’m gonna go shoot my ol’ lady,
You know I found her messing around town with another man
And you know that ain’t cool, watch me.

Hey Joe, I heard you shot your woman down,
You shot her down to the ground, you shot her.
Yes I did, yes I did, yes I did I shot her, I shot her,
I caught her messin’ round with some other man,
So I got on my truck, I gave her the gun and I shot her,
I shot her, shoot her one more time for me.

Hey Joe, where you gonna, where you gonna run to,
Where you gonna run to, Joe, where you gonna run to ?
Go get a cover.
I’m gonna go down South, I’m gonna go down South to Mexico,
I’m going down, down, down to Mexico where a man can be free
No one’s gonna put a noose around my neck,
No one is gonna give me life, no.
I’m goin’ down to Mexico, I’m going down.

You’re not going to hear ’em stand there
And look at the stars as big as holes in the arms
And the stars like a back truck electric flag
And I’m standing there under that flag with your carbine
Between my legs, you know I felt so free of death beyond me
I felt so free, the F.B.I. is looking for me baby,
But they’ll never find me, no, they can hold me down like a
And I’m still on the run and they can speculate what I’m fee
But daddy, daddy, you’ll never know just what I was feelin’,
But I’m sorry I am no little pretty little rich girl,
I am nobody’s million dollar baby, I am nobody’s Patsy anymore
I’m nobody’s million dollar baby, I’m nobody’s Patsy anymore
And I feel so free.

1974 B-side of

Evening Standard, Hulton Archive,Getty Images

Hendrix wasn’t one to play by the rules, and on Jan. 4, 1969, during a guest appearance on the Lulu television show, the guitar legend was up to the task. While Lulu was a great pop singer, she and Hendrix were pretty much worlds apart in the public eye,. Still, the producers of her BBC TV show booked the Jimi Hendrix Experience and approached Hendrix about singing a duet with Lulu on her big hit, “To Sir With Love,” which was not first and foremost on Jimi Hendrix’s mind, to say the least.
The band were scheduled to perform two songs, one from their latest LP, Electric Ladyland, and later in the show, they were to do their first U.K. hit, “Hey Joe.” According to Noel Redding in his autobiography, Are You Experienced?, Lulu would join the band to finish up “Hey Joe” before a segue into her signature song. To deal with the stress of the situation, Redding said the band were “so straight it was only natural that we would try to combat that atmosphere by having a smoke in our dressing room. In our haste, the lump of hash got away and slipped down the sink drainpipe,” he continued. “I found a maintenance man and begged tools from him with the story of a lost ring. He was too helpful, offering to dismantle the drain for us. It took ages to dissuade him, but we succeeded in our task and had a great smoke.”
The band went on and performed “Voodoo Child” as scheduled, but once Lulu introduced the band for their classic take on “Hey Joe,” the Experience veered loudly off script. A raucous free-form, feedback-drenched jam eventually gave way to “Hey Joe,” but midway through, Hendrix stopped and announced “We’d like to stop playing this rubbish and dedicate a song to the Cream, regardless of what kind of group they may be in. We dedicate this to Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce.”


At that moment, the band plowed through an instrumental version of the Cream classic “Sunshine of Your Love.” Cream had just announced their breakup, hence the tribute. “We played past the point where Lulu might have joined us,” said Redding. “Played through the time for talking at the end, played through [producer] Stanley [Dorfman] tearing his hair, pointing to his watch and silently screaming at us.”
This stunt, which led to a ban on Hendrix and friends by the BBC, would be imitated eight years later by Elvis Costello during an appearance on Saturday Night Live. Costello and the Attractions started off playing “Less Than Zero,” before he stopped the song and the band kicked into “Radio Radio.” NBC banned Costello for 12 years. He later admitted that it was indeed an homage to Hendrix on the Lulu show.

 

Jimi Hendrix wasn’t one to play by the rules, and on Jan. 4, 1969, during a guest appearance on the Lulu Show, the guitar legend was up to the task. While Lulu was a great pop singer, she and Hendrix were pretty much worlds apart in the public eye,. Still, the producers of her BBC TV Show booked the Jimi Hendrix Experience and approached Hendrix about singing a duet with Lulu on her big hit, ‘To Sir with Love,’ which was not first and foremost on Hendrix’ mind, to say the least.

The band were scheduled to perform two songs, one from their latest LP, ‘Electric Ladyland,’ and later in the show, they were to do their first U.K. hit, ‘Hey Joe.’ According to Noel Redding in his autobiography, ‘Are You Experienced?,’ Lulu would join the band to finish up ‘Hey Joe’ before a segue into her signature song. To deal with the stress of the situation, Redding said the band were “so straight it was only natural that we would try to combat that atmosphere by having a smoke in our dressing room. In our haste, the lump of hash got away and slipped down the sink drainpipe,” he continued. “I found a maintenance man and begged tools from him with the story of a lost ring. He was too helpful, offering to dismantle the drain for us. It took ages to dissuade him, but we succeeded in our task and had a great smoke.”

The band went on and performed ‘Voodoo Child’ as scheduled, but once Lulu introduced the band for their classic take on ‘Hey Joe,’ the Experience veered loudly off script. A raucous freeform feedback-drenched jam eventually gave way to ‘Hey Joe,’ but then midway through, Hendrix stopped the band, announcing, “We’d like to stop playing this rubbish and dedicate a song to the Cream, regardless of what kind of group they may be in. We dedicate this to Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce.”

At that moment, the band plowed through an instrumental version of the Cream classic Sunshine Of Your Love.’ Cream had just announced their breakup, hence the tribute. “We played past the point where Lulu might have joined us,” said Redding. “Played through the time for talking at the end, played through [producer] Stanley [Dorfman] tearing his hair, pointing to his watch and silently screaming at us.”

This stunt, which led to a ban on Hendrix by the BBC, would be imitated eight years later by Elvis Costello during an appearance on ‘Saturday Night Live.’ Costello and the Attractions started off playing ‘Less Than Zero,’ before he stopped the song and the band kicked into ‘Radio Radio.’ NBC banned Costello for 12 years. He later admitted that it was indeed an homage to Hendrix on the Lulu show.

Read More: 46 Years Ago: Jimi Hendrix Experience Banned From BBC | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/44-years-ago-jimi-hendrix-experience-banned-from-bbc/?utm_source=sailthru&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=newsletter_4572276&trackback=tsmclip