Posts Tagged ‘H.C. McEntire’

The Mount Moriah frontwoman’s solo debut. streaked with warm, yet wistful, Americana hues, it glowed throughout 2018. we’ve fallen even harder for her follow-up, ‘eno axis’.

Sonically, it’s an album shaped enormously by the atmosphere it was recorded in – the crew’s synergy & positivity, the proximity & presence of a band in a room playing with intention. structurally, it’s a group of songs inspired by the colours & tones of open tunings, by the sacrality of space & instinct. Stylistically, it’s folk-rock leaning into its curious experimental side & moved by the spiritual rawness of classic soul & the simplicity of earnest pop.

Narratively, H.C. McEntire’s Eno Axis is about finding direction in the natural world, and following love. Sonically, it’s an album shaped enormously by the atmosphere it was recorded in – the crew’s synergy and positivity, the proximity and presence of a band in a room playing with intention. Structurally, it’s a group of songs inspired by the colours and tones of open tunings, by the sacrality of space and instinct. Eno Axis feels like a confident and mature step forward from her debut album Lionheart – in tone, arrangement, production, and spirit.

Stylistically, it’s folk-rock leaning into its curious experimental side and moved by the spiritual rawness of classic soul and the simplicity of earnest pop.

‘eno axis’ feels like a confident & mature step forward from her debut album ‘Lionheart’ – in tone, arrangement, production & spirit. for fans of courtney marie andrews, margo price. joan shelley, first aid kit, the be good tanyas.

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Releases August 21st, 2020

Produced by H.C. McEntire, Luke Norton, and Missy Thangs
Lyrics by H.C. McEntire except where noted

Performed by:
H.C. McEntire (vocals, guitar)
Luke Norton (guitars, keys, backing vocals)
Casey Toll (bass)
Daniel Faust (drums, percussion)
Nathan Bowles (banjo)
Allyn Love (pedal steel)
Mario Arnez (backing vocals)
Justin Morris (backing vocals)

Endless gratitude to Merge Records, Missy, Sarah, all our families and friends and animals.

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Lyrically, H.C. McEntire a rare openly gay woman making country music  touches on spirituality, sexuality, politics and Southern culture, with much of Lionheart’s material written while the battle for LGBTQ rights intensified in North Carolina. So in “When You Come For Me,” when McEntire sings “Mama, I dreamed that I had no hand to hold. And the land I cut my teeth on wouldn’t let me call it home,” it’s comforting, inspiring even, to know that she has Phil Cook and Tift Merritt and William Tyler and others backing her musically. There is strength in numbers, and McEntire is a strong, centering presence in these songs.

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You might not have heard of H.C. McEntire, but you’ll almost certainly know her collaborators; Kathleen Hanna, William Tyler and Angel Olsen to name just a few of the stellar accompanying cast. Currently best known as frontwoman of Mount Moriah, stepping out solo feels like a logical next step for H.C, a songwriter with the noble aim of reclaiming country music from, “the hetero-normative, homogenous schtick of tailgates and six-packs and men chasing women”.

The resultant album, “Lionheart”, is undeniably a record of turbulence and change how could any album about America released this year not be – but more than that it is a record about reclaiming your own power. Lionheart takes all the traditions of the American South, and sets about tearing them to pieces. As H.C. McEntire explains, “in music, there are no rules. You make your own language. You can be both the Southern rock outlier and the twangy gospel conduit. You can be both the cherubic, honey-tongued innocent and the ardent punk. To get here—to find my lion heart—I had to become them all”. Mainly though on Lionheart, despite all her influences, all her outfits, all her collaborators, H.C. McEntire sounds entirely like herself, and it doesn’t get much better than that.