Posts Tagged ‘God’s Favorite Customer’

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Pure Comedy brought the universe into his musical world, grand-scaling both Tillman’s cleverness and an earnest love for humanity, On God’s Favorite Customer, he sounds all by himself wracked with self-doubt, on the verge (perhaps at the apex) of hopelessness. He’s his comically dark self during hazy nightmare “Mr. Tillman,” mind fractured and teetering at the edge of bender doom in a hallucinogenic hotel. “Hangout At The Gallows” is positively, dreamily dour, and “The Palace” is nearly cripplingly lonesome. There’s little to adorn most of these songs lyrically economical, sonically without much pageantry—but the intimacy and honesty results in some of Tillman’s most stunning songwriting. On the aching “Just Dumb Enough To Try,” he forces a death grip on hope for the victory of love and self-betterment, against all odds, and “The Songwriter” deftly examines the destruction that can be inherent when your partner is your muse.

“Please Don’t Die” rolls easy with an understated twang, howling harmonica, and twinkling piano, combining some of Tillman’s best moves heart-baring vulnerability, swirling melodies, and just a touch of the surreal—to convey that familiar feeling of when we just can’t stand to lose someone.

Father John Misty is a contentious character. His last album, Pure Comedy, He ruthlessly bashed most aspects of human nature for over an hour, upping the ante of cynicism found on his two previous albums. But on June’s God’s Favorite Customer, Joshua Tillman turns his ever-critical gaze inward to write an album full of both touching self-reflective ballads and ironic psychedelic pop singles. These songs return to themes Tillman has previously tackled: battling alcoholism, his dedication to his wife and general critiques of humanity, but in a way that seems more hopeful or, perhaps, more trivialized. This slight positivity is amplified in a sonic change:

He turns from the safe, Randy Newman-styled of piano-lead singer-songwriter tunes to embody elements of vintage psychedelic pop and flex his vocal range. “Date Night” and “Mr. Tillman” are both short, funny songs perfectly poised to become radio hits. Ballads “The Songwriter” and “The Palace” sound more like traditional Misty, but are more sad than purely cynical. It seems Tillman has gotten over his hatred of everyone and everything, and given us an album with songs that both put us in our feels and deserve to be belted out in angst.

Father John Misty has announced he’ll be coming to Leicester’s De Montfort Hall and The Forum, Bath (Official) later this year as part of his 2018 World Tour! see dates on the top header.

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Written largely in New York between Summer 2016 and Winter 2017, Josh Tillman’s fourth Father John Misty LP, God’s Favorite Customer, reflects on the experience of being caught between the vertigo of heartbreak and the manic throes of freedom.

After converting sharply honed cynicism and rampant misanthropy into a collection of witty, often scabrous and somehow deeply soulful songs on Father John Misty’s 2017 release Pure Comedy, Josh Tillman more fully targets himself on the follow-up. God’s Favorite Customer is a self-lacerating piece of work, mostly written during a six-week stretch in 2016 when he was living alone in a hotel room in the midst of an existential crisis. He’s opaque about the cause, but not the effects: The album plays like Tillman is watching himself have an out-of-body experience as he, or his Misty persona, behaves erratically in public, sends alarming texts to his wife in the middle of the night and repeatedly questions whether love is redemptive enough to save him

God’s Favorite Customerreveals a bittersweetness and directness in Tillman’s songwriting, without sacrificing any of his wit or taste for the absurd. From “Mr. Tillman,” where he trains his lens on his own misadventure, to the cavernous pain of estrangement in “Please Don’t Die,” Tillman plays with perspective throughout to alternatingly hilarious and devastating effect. “We’re Only People (And There’s Not Much Anyone Can Do About That)” is a meditation on our inner lives and the limitations we experience in our attempts to give and receive love. It stands in solidarity with the title track, which examines the ironic relationship between forgiveness and sin. Together, these are songs that demand to know either real love or what comes after, and as the album progresses, that entreaty leads to discovering the latter’s true stakes.

God’s Favorite Customer was produced by Tillman and recorded with Jonathan Rado, Dave Cerminara, and Trevor Spencer. The album features contributions from Haxan Cloak, Natalie Mering of Weyes Blood, longtimecollaborator Jonathan Wilson, and members of Misty’s touring band.

“God’s Favourite Customer” is out 1st June on Bella Union Records.

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Father John Misty was joined on stage by the Ulster Orchestra for a rendition of his new song ‘Please Don’t Die’ during the BBC’s Biggest Weekend event.

Taken from Father John Misty’s new album God’s Favorite Customerthe emotionally charged and somewhat self-confessional record that seems to be directed at past misdemeanours and his marital problems, Tillman sings of “pointless benders with reptilian strangers” and waking up to texts saying, “It’s all too much.”

Josh Tillman has always been able to tell a tale with his songwriting and, with the addition of the Ulster Orchestra while performing live in Belfast, the emotion undoubtedly has the ability to take this song to the next level.

Playing alongside the Ulster Orchestra, Josh Tillman Father John Misty debuts new song Please Don’t Die.

Father John Misty has shared his disorienting new video for “Mr. Tillman,” the first single off his upcoming new album God’s Favorite Customer. Just as the song’s lyrics zero in on the singer’s unpleasant experience at a hotel, the “Mr. Tillman” video is like The Shining meets “Hotel California,” as Father John Misty is doomed to relive his stay and inability to leave countless times. The result is interactions with doppelgangers, an attempted suicide and a taxicab escape.

In February, the singer, whose real name is Josh Tillman, unveiled “Mr. Tillman” along with a low-budget green-screened video of himself messing around in a hotel.

Father John Misty has previously released two songs, “Disappointing Diamonds Are the Rarest of Them All” and “Just Dumb Enough to Try,” from his forthcoming album God’s Favorite Customer, the speedy follow-up to 2017’s Pure Comedy. God’s Favorite Customer arrives June 1st.

“Mr. Tillman” is off of Father John Misty’s upcoming album, God’s Favorite Customer, out June 1st on Sub Pop and Bella Union.

Fjm gods favorite customer standard cover

After information about his new album leaked,  Father John Misty has formally announced the release of his fourth album, God’s Favorite Customer, along with two new singles.

A press release issued by Sub Pop Records, confirms the leaked album, including the tracklist, the album art (photographed by Pari Dukovic), and the June 1st release via Sub Pop and Bella Union Records. The follow-up to Pure Comedy was written and produced by Misty, and recorded with Jonathan Rado, Dave Cerminara and Trevor Spencer. While the official album news is exciting, the real excitement comes in the full versions of the songs “Just Dumb Enough to Try” and “Disappointing Diamonds are the Rarest of Them All,”.

Each song gives Misty a different angle by expanding his sound while staying true to his indie folk-rock roots. Both songs seem to be a nod to classic, 1970s Elton John, as “Just Dumb” goes for full singer-songwriter glory, with its lush production of jangling guitars and delicate strings leaning towards classic John ballads like “Candle in the Wind” and “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.” “Disappointing Diamonds” is more of a throwback to “Benny and the Jets” and “Crocodile Rock” with its zany production built on huge piano chords and zooming electric guitar riffs.

The title track, which examines the ironic relationship between forgiveness and sin. Together, these are songs that demand to know either real love or what comes after, and as the album progresses, that entreaty leads to discovering the latter’s true stakes.

God’s Favorite Customer is available for preorder now on Father John Misty’s official store along with Sub Pop, Bella Union and select independent retailers in five formats: limited Loser edition on metallic purple vinyl, standard LP on black vinyl, CD, streaming and digital download, and cassette.

In addition to the album release, Misty will go on tour starting in April, in support of the album with Gillian Welch, TV on the Radio and Jenny Lewis serving as special guests at select shows.

Hopefully, the rest of 2018 will be filled with new surprises Misty has a hand in. Listen to “Just Dumb Enough to Try” and “Disappointing Diamonds are the Rarest of Them All” below.

Father John Misty’s new song “Just Dumb Enough to Try” is off of his upcoming album, God’s Favorite Customer, out June 1st on Sub Pop and Bella Union.

Written largely in New York between Summer 2016 and Winter 2017, Josh Tillman’s fourth Father John Misty LP, God’s Favorite Customer, reflects on the experience of being caught between the vertigo of heartbreak and the manic throes of freedom. God’s Favorite Customer reveals a bitter sweetness and directness in Tillman’s songwriting, without sacrificing any of his wit or taste for the absurd. From Mr. Tillman, where he trains his lens on his own misadventure,

“Mr. Tillman” is off of Father John Misty’s upcoming album, God’s Favorite Customer, out June 1st on Sub Pop and Bella Union

God’s Favorite Customer was produced by Tillman and recorded with Jonathan Rado, Dave Cerminara, and Trevor Spencer. The album features contributions from Haxan Cloak, Natalie Merring of Weyes Blood, longtime collaborator Jonathan Wilson, and members of Misty’s touring band.

Father John Misty’s new song “Disappointing Diamonds Are the Rarest of Them All” is off of his upcoming album, God’s Favorite Customer, out June 1st on Sub Pop and Bella Union.