Posts Tagged ‘Nation of Language’

Happy New Year everyone. Hope you’re doing alright in these ceaselessly overwhelming times. I’m emailing you to let you know Nation of Language have just released a new song today, and to share an early link to pre-order the 7″ vinyl record that it will be on, alongside our song “A Different Kind of Life”.

The new song is called “Deliver Me From Wondering Why“. We let ourselves get a little weird on this one. We hope you enjoy it. Maybe put it on and go for a drive, or just sit on the couch and stare into the middle distance.  Both songs were produced by Nick Millhiser, who some of you may know as one half of Holy Ghost!, with whom we’ve shared stages in NYC, DC, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Both songs were also mastered by Heba Kadry, who has worked on all of our releases.

Brooklyn synthpop group Nation of Language are back with a very catchy new single that is reminiscent on Human League and OMD. “‘Deliver Me From Wondering Why’ is a bit of an exploration, rooted in a desire for something repetitious and a bit spacey — something that would make you really want to zone out or go for a long drive on the highway,” says Ian Devaney. “We worked on it with Nick Millhiser (Holy Ghost!) and it was just a really fun exercise in letting the track carry us wherever it was going to go. The backbone of the steady synth arpeggios and rhythms just leads endlessly forward and lets the mind wander around it.”

Now, unfortunately, due to supply chain problems, these records probably won’t be pressed and shipped until some time around June. But at the pace time has been moving the last 12 months, I’m sure June will be here disturbingly quickly.  

With love and light,
NOL 

Image may contain: one or more people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments and night

Blissed out 80’s synth inspired album that is refreshing and spectacular. Brooklyn-based synth auteurs Nation of Language entered 2020 as one of the most heralded new acts of recent memory, having already earned high-praise from the likes of NME, Fader, Pitchfork, Stereogum and countless others for their ability to blend the upbeat with a healthy dose of sardonic melancholy on their early singles. Inspired by the early new-wave and punk movements, the band has quickly earned a reputation for delivering frenzied nights of unconventional bliss to rapt audiences, and established themselves as bright young stars emerging from a crowded NYC landscape. After much eager anticipation, their gloom pop debut album Introduction, Presence is finally released. For fans of OMD, The National, New Order and Tears for Fears.

Brooklyn-based band Nation of Language, led by vocalist and songwriter Ian Devaney and featuring his wife Aidan Devaney on keys and Michael Sui-Poi on bass, unleashed their debut album Introduction, Presence in 2020, and it’s crowned them as the most exciting new synth-pop act in years. The band has been releasing invigorating, ’80s-indebted singles for about five years now—tracks like “I’ve Thought About Chicago” and “Reality” are undoubtedly direct descendents of Pet Shop Boys, A Flock of Seagulls and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, but there’s also a subtle glow that recalls 21st century anthemic indie rock à la Arcade Fire, The National and The Killers. While their decade-spanning influences can certainly be scavenged, their songs always sound bigger than them Devaney’s song writing feels essential and eternal.

“Rush & Fever’ began with the idea that I wanted to write a song around an unchanging bassline. I’ve always been interested in the concept of keeping certain aspects of a song static and then looking at what can change around that core element, and how those evolutions change our relationship to whatever has remained constant. The bass helps give the song this relentless forward motion that I think serves the theme, which is essentially an examination of a relationship of questionable seriousness or value, and how our minds can stumble forward over themselves as we try to process these relationships.”

Nation Of Language “Rush & Fever” from Introduction Presence

Nation of Language returned to share a new song “A Different Kind Of Life,” the first new music since their debut album Introduction, Presence, which dropped earlier this year. “This song first started to come together in the early days of the Trump administration, but was never quite finished and got a bit lost as time went by,” says frontman Ian Devaney. “When the demo resurfaced during the pandemic, the song struck a chord not just in its intended political context but in the context of so many people losing family members, jobs, or any semblance of normality—whatever might be left of it after the past few years.”

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Working Class Synth-Pop. Debut album Introduction Presence is out now in all formats. Nation of Language are also releasing an exclusive, translucent pressing of their debut album through Rough Trade Records,

released November 12th, 2020
Written by Nation of Language

Nation of Language Announce Limited Edition Seven-Inch Single With Pixies Cover

Releasing a cover of The Pixies song “Gouge Away” on all streaming platforms and announcing a pre-order of the vinyl copy, which should ship in November. That sounds far away but, honestly, it isn’t. Summer is winding down folks. Sand through the hourglass and all that. Dark Nights Light mornings.

Anyway, the 7″ copy of “Gouge Away” will come with a vinyl-only Nation of Language song called “One More Try”, which I think is most aptly characterized as “a real bummer.”

So smash this indulge your record-collecting urges so I can keep singing this song to myself, which is something that may or may not, but definitely does, happen with regularity. Speaking of record collectors, for those who haven’t picked up a copy of the full album just yet, Rough Trade is doing a *limited* coloured-vinyl edition of the record, available here. From what I understand, these are moving quite quickly, so make haste. Once again, thank you for supporting us. With all sincerity, this is a tough time for bands to be releasing music, but you’ve given us more than we had ever hoped for. Stay safe out there.
Ian, Aidan, & Mike

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A cover of the Pixies song

Released August 20th, 2020
Written by Black Francis Performed by Nation of Language

Now and then a debut comes along that feels more like a greatest hits collection. Introduction, Presence is a portrait of Nation Of Language’s first few years — singles trying out different iterations of a sound and attacking various ideas, but fully-formed even within that process of early discovery. Climactic moments abound: the twin “where is my life going” catharses of album bookends “Tournament” and “The Wall & I,” the digital wormhole of political screed “Indignities,” reclaimed awe in the city lights of “On Division St.” Eventually the vignettes form a whole story, tracing the listlessness and yearning of being not-quite-young-anymore in precarious times.

Brooklyn-based synth auteurs Nation of Language entered 2020 as one of the most heralded new acts of recent memory, having already earned high-praise from the likes of NME, FADER, Stereogum and countless others for their energetic anthems’ ability to blend the upbeat with a healthy dose of sardonic melancholy.  Inspired by the early new-wave and punk movements, the band quick earned a reputation for delivering frenzied nights of unconventional bliss to rapt audiences, establishing themselves in the process as bright young stars emerging from a crowded NYC landscape.

The small handful of offerings from the band that began circulating in recent years prompted unusually big reactions from the press for an unsigned and fully independent new artist, turning many a head in their direction. Stereogum labeled the band “Immediately Addicting” while the NME went on to describe Nation of Language as ‘An Absolute Blast’ and some of the ‘most exciting music coming out of New York’.
What a debut Introduction, Presence is! An album of the year contender for sure.

While many of their contemporaries are hellbent on 1980s homages, Nation of Language’s song writing influences recalls 2000s bands like Arcade Fire and The National just as much as ’80s golden era groups. You can hear Matt Berninger like tone and pacing on “Tournament,” James Murphy’s warmth and exhilaration on “Rush & Fever,” the zest and pomp of Cut Copy’s Dan Whitford on “Indignities” and Arcade Fire-sized elation on “The Wall & I.”

From the debut album Introduction Presence

Image may contain: one or more people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments and night

Sometimes a synth-pop song’s only purpose is to make you feel alive on the dance floor, and that’s fine. You can still feel a deep emotional connection as you latch onto its pulse and forget your worries. But the kind of life-affirming synth-pop that makes you cry—think giants like Robyn or LCD Soundsystem—are the artists that will ruin your life (in the best possible way). New York City’s Nation of Language have been releasing singles since 2016, and their lead singer and songwriter Ian Devaney recently collaborated with Strokes drummer Fab Moretti on a project called machinegum for an album last year. It was obvious, even several years ago, that Devaney was an unusually consistent songwriter—every song was capable of making you pull over your car for a quick sob or triumphantly stick your head out of the sunroof with outstretched arms. His ’80s-indebted electro-pop meshed beautifully with the dance-punk sounds of the city’s yesteryear, and his songs had an emotional immediacy that was un-rivalled. Now, having finally unveiled their debut full-length, which contains some of those incredible early singles, it feels like Nation of Language have more of a right to claim the “soaring synth-pop” mantle than anyone else right now.

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Released March 26th, 2020
Written by Nation of Language

Image may contain: one or more people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments and night

Sometimes a synth-pop song’s only purpose is to make you feel alive on the dance floor, and that’s fine. You can still feel a deep emotional connection as you latch onto its pulse and forget your worries. But the kind of life-affirming synth-pop that makes you cry—think giants like Robyn or LCD Soundsystem—are the artists that will ruin your life (in the best possible way). New York City’s Nation of Language have been releasing singles since 2016, and their lead singer and songwriter Ian Devaney recently collaborated with Strokes drummer Fab Moretti on a project called machinegum for an album last year.

It was obvious, even several years ago, that Devaney was an unusually consistent songwriter—every song was capable of making you pull over your car for a quick sob or triumphantly stick your head out of the sunroof with outstretched arms. His ’80s-indebted electro-pop meshed beautifully with the dance-punk sounds of the city’s yesteryear, and his songs had an emotional immediacy that was unrivaled. Now ready to unveil their debut full-length, which contains some of those incredible early singles, it feels like Nation of Language have more of a right to claim the “soaring synth-pop” mantle than anyone else right now.

From the debut album Introduction Presence

Nation Of Language share new single “Reality”

Led by singer-songwriter Ian Devaney, Nation of Language evoke a nostalgic ‘80s new-wave sound mixed up with modern appeal. In January, the band released a darkly romantic new single, “On Division St.” They recently supported The Wombats in the U.S. and even managed to recruit The Strokes’ Fab Moretti for another single, the bouncing “Indignities.” . Their new single is a punchy electro-pop tune with Ian Devaney lamenting the monotony of life (“He’s sick of waiting for the sound of something more / That’s the only certainty”) and the surreal nature of reality (“Reality is nothing to me / Where I won’t be as hopeless as I seem / Some kind of waking dream”).

Based in Brooklyn synth rockers Nation of Language craft intoxicating new wave music that nods to the past while locking eyes on the future. Today, the band have shared another track and new single “Reality,” and it’s got all the hypnotic makings of a late night gem. Frontman Ian Devaney describes the song as “revolving around a person whose everyday life has become so mundane and frustrating that they retreat into their own head.