Posts Tagged ‘Blood On The Tracks’

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Months before Bob Dylan released “Blood On The Tracks” in early 1975, a small number of test pressings were circulated, consisting entirely of material from sessions at A&R Recording Studios in New York City. (Dylan re-recorded five of these tracks in Minneapolis for inclusion on the final album.) Those original records were soon bootlegged, and the alternate history of one of Dylan’s most acclaimed works was born.

This LP is an exact duplicate of the test pressing, containing unique mixes from the New York session available for the first time. Original New York Test Pressing • Months before Bob Dylan released Blood On The Tracks in early 1975, a small number of test pressings were circulated, consisting entirely of material from sessions at A&R Recording Studios in New York City. (Dylan re-recorded five of these tracks in Minneapolis for inclusion on the final album.) Those original records were soon bootlegged, and the alternate history of one of Dylan’s most acclaimed works was born. This LP is an exact duplicate of the test pressing, containing unique mixes from the New York session, available commercially for the first time

Side One:  1. Tangled Up In Blue 2. Simple Twist of Fate 3. You’re a Big Girl Now 4. Idiot Wind 5. You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go Side Two:  1. Meet Me In The Morning 2. Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts 3. If You See Her, Say Hello 4. Shelter from the Storm 5. Buckets of Rain

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Blood on the Tracks is the fifteenth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released in January 1975 on Columbia Records. The album marked Dylan’s return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. Most of the lyrics on the album revolve around heartache, anger, and loneliness.

The album, which followed on the resurgence of critical acclaim for Dylan’s work after Planet Waves, was greeted enthusiastically by fans and critics. In the years following its release it has come to be regarded as one of his best albums; it is common for subsequent records to be labeled his “best since Blood on the Tracks.” It is also commonly seen as a standard for confessional singer-songwriter albums; though Dylan has denied that the songs are autobiographical, but his son Jakob Dylan has stated: “The songs are my parents talking.”

 

With good reason, Dylan is most revered for his nearly unparalleled streak of legendary albums in the 1960s (including 1963’s The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, 1965’s Highway 61 Revisited, and 1966’s Blonde on Blonde), but he saved arguably his finest album ever until 1975, making one of rock ’n’ roll’s most jaw-dropping comebacks with the striking, emotional Blood on the Tracks. Despite being recorded in a ridiculous 10 days (barring a last-minute re-tracking of a few songs), the album remains Dylan’s warmest, richest recording—loads of purring organs, shuffling acoustics, and soulful rhythm sections. But as always with Dylan albums, it’s the words that steal the show, particularly on the bitter epic “Idiot Wind” and the haunting, uplifting “Tangled Up in Blue.” Rock’s most critically acclaimed troubadour kept on releasing wonderful albums after Blood on the Tracks but he never topped this classic album release.

Well, Blood On The Tracks did consciously what I used to do unconsciously. I didn’t perform it well, I didn’t have the power to perform it well, but I did write the songs; they can be changed but the idea was right…
~Bob Dylan (to Matt Damsker, September 1978)

in stunning, total contrast to the previous album, Before the Flood, this 16th Dylan album triumphantly shows more subtlety and nuance than anything he’d ever done, and as honed a use of understatement as on John Wesley Harding. At the time this was the most unexpected leap of Dylan’s career. After years of comparatively second-rate work and a considerable decline in his reputation, here was an album to stand with Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde.
~Michael Gray

‘Simple Twist of Fate’ is another absolutely extraordinary performance. Where ‘Tangled Up In Blue’ is bright, bouncy, jangly, ‘Simple Twist Of Fate’ is soft and warm and mournful. Dylan’s voice is.. gentle and rounded.
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan: Performing Artist, Vol 2: The Middle Years 1974-1986)

Bob Dylan BOTT back

thanks to All Dylan

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Today is Bob Dylan’s 75th birthday, So here the Singer Songwriter Tom Russell covering the song Lily, Rosemary, and the Jack of Hearts from the album “Blood On The Tracks”  like a mini-folk opera: Eliza Gilkyson plays both Lily and Rosemary, Joe Ely plays Big Jim,  Tom play’s the Jack of Hearts. It’s a real cowboy-mystery song in vaudeville time. Only thing I can figure is that Lily kills big Jim and frames Rosemary, who gets hung for the crime. I get that from the line: “Lily had already taken all of the dye out of her hair…” Perhaps impersonating Rosemary as she knifed Big Jim – plus she came from a broken home and had a certain flash in her eyes. What’s your take on it? (Lost verse included)…oh well, it was “just another night in the life of the Jack of Hearts.”

Tom Russell, Eliza Gilkyson, and Joe Ely cover Bob Dylan. From the 2004 album Indians Cowboys Horses And Dogs

Lily, Rosemary, and the Jack of Hearts, This song was transferred from a near mint vinyl test pressing of the withdrawn early New York version of Blood On The Tracks. These songs were recorded in New York in 1974. Bob Dylan changed his mind on many solo arrangements, deciding to re-record half of the songs in Minneapolis, Minnesota using a local backing band. also released on a bootleg entitled “Blood On The Tapes.”