Posts Tagged ‘Auto-Pain’

Deeper know tragedy better than most. While recording their sophomore album Auto-Pain, guitarist Mike Clawson left the band due to deteriorating relationships with the Chicago group’s other three members. Later, after their record was finished and the post-punk act was touring in Europe, they received the news that Clawson had taken his own life. Throughout this catastrophic period, Deeper decided not to let Clawson’s passing derail their tour and release schedule, instead using them as a way to pay tribute to his contributions to the band and speak out about mental health .

As lead singer and guitarist Nic Gohl mentioned in an interview , Auto-Pain was completed prior to Clawson’s death, but the album’s lyrics, written as a stream of consciousness, took on a completely different meaning. And it’s hard to listen to them any other way: Some depict graphic images of self-harm and violence (“Forced to set yourself on fire tonight / You shouldn’t count on the sun” from “Run,” or “I just want you to feel sick / Cause you’re better as you’re lying on the bathroom floor” from “Lake Song”) while others are a bit more abstract (“Is it any wonder / I feel so gray” from “Esoteric”). Auto-Pain is an album built on hues of blacks and grays, depicting a shadowy, sinister world. Clawson’s suicide turns those already gloomy colours into something several shades darker.

Auto-Pain represents the constant wave of depression felt by many in everyday life. Stemmed from Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’, Auto-Pain is a concept meant to be an inverse to soma, a pill in the book which makes everything numb. The idea of auto-pain is to epitomize the desire to return to a connection with thoughts and clarity, which comes at the expense of feeling everything simultaneously. The album artwork features the now-demolished Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago capturing the band’s rounded-off brutalism, and the album title appears in Urdu, a nod to drummer Shiraz Bhatti’s Pakistani heritage.

Released March 27th, 2020

A portion of the proceeds from Auto-Pain will be donated to Hope For The Day an organization that actively works to break the silence surrounding mental health.

We couldn’t be more proud to share Deeper‘s sophomore album “Auto-Pain” out today on Fire Talk. Truly love these boys and hope you’ll take some time today to check out the record. The press has been all over it, if you want to dig in more read this excellent feature via Stereogum .

Auto-Pain represents the constant wave of depression felt by many in everyday life. Stemmed from Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’, Auto-Pain is a concept meant to be an inverse to soma, a pill in the book which makes everything numb. The idea of auto-pain is to epitomize the desire to return to a connection with thoughts and clarity, which comes at the expense of feeling everything simultaneously. The album artwork features the now-demolished Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago capturing the band’s rounded-off brutalism, and the album title appears in Urdu, a nod to drummer Shiraz Bhatti’s Pakistani heritage. The record was recorded and mixed by Chicago scene luminary Dave Vetraino (Lala Lala, Dehd) and mastered at Chicago Mastering by Greg Obis (Ne-Hi, Melkbelly).

A portion of the proceeds from Auto-Pain will be donated to Hope For The Day an organization that actively works to break the silence surrounding mental health

From Deeper’s Sophomore album “Auto-Pain” out March 27th on Fire Talk Records.

deeper

Chicago band Deeper have just released their new album, “Auto-Pain” and they’ve just shared one last appetizer before we can hear the whole thing. “The Knife” is a jagged post-punk ripper, moody and measured, that comes with a genuinely excellent, equally tense music video set in an auto garage. Following up their 2018 s/t debut, their new album feels leaner and more to the point. The jagged guitar licks and Nic Gohl’s vocals cut right to bone and creates a tension that I am unable shake throughout. Bassist Drew McBride, and drummer Shiraz Bhatti are on point throughout. While they don’t sound anything like The National, the rhythm section reminds me of how it takes me couple of listens of their albums to fully digest what they’re doing and really appreciate it. Deeper were on tour with Montreal’s Corridor when the coronavirus pandemic took hold and they’re now back at home in Chicago.

Inspired by Aldous Huxley’s dystopian classic Brave New World, the timing of this album feels like it was preordained for these crazy times with Chicago’s weather particularly gray and dreary. As the listener I am on edge throughout and sucked into their sphere.