Posts Tagged ‘A&M Records’

Humble Pie’s “Up Our Sleeve: Official Bootleg Box Set Vol 3” is latest recorded testament to what this band did best; playing bluesy, gutsy, soulful hard rock, live on stage. Drawn from a variety of audience recordings that have previously only been available as “under the counter” pirate releases, this is an honest and raw tribute to a classic and much missed super-group on the 1970s, released in conjunction with Pie founder member and drummer, Jerry Shirley.

Originally emerging from the remnants of 1960s beat heroes The Small Faces, Humble Pie formed in 1969 when mercurial guitarist and vocalist Steve Marriott joined forces with The Herd’s Peter Frampton, joined by drummer Jerry Shirley and bassist Greg Ridley. After two albums for Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate label, Humble Pie switched to A&M records, and began their ascent to conquering the theatres and then arenas of North America, culminating in 1972’s double live “Performance: Rockin’ The Filmore”.

Peter Frampton left shortly after to pursue a successful solo career, replaced by Clem Clempson. It was this line-up that is captured across these 5 discs. .Spread across CDs 1 & 2, The Pie were promoting their latest studio record “Smokin'” when they hit Gaelic Park, in Riverdale, NY on 22nd August 1972, from which ‘Hot ‘N’ Nasty’, ‘I Wonder’ and their cover of Eddie Cochran’s ‘C’mon Everybody’ were taken.

Also featured are ‘Hallelujah (I Love Her So)’, ‘I Don’t Need No Doctor’, ‘Four Day Creep’ and ‘Rollin’ Stone’ from the previous year’s “Performance: Rockin’ The Filmore”. .Recorded three days later, CD 3 features a similar set, as well as their take on the Stones ‘Honky Tonk Women’ plus ‘Up Our Sleeve’, both of which would feature on 1973’s “Eat It”. .By the time they hit Boston’s Music Hall on 10th April 1973 featured on CD 4, Humble Pie had been joined by the Blackberries, Venetta Fields, Clydie King & Billie Barnum. Promoting the new double LP “Eat It”, the set includes band original ‘Up Our Sleeve’.

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Humble Pie

One of the UK’s most charismatic and distinctive frontmen was taken from us when Steve Marriott, of the Small Faces and Humble Pie, died in a house fire on 20th April 1991. He was a cruelly young 44 years of age.

Thankfully, Steve’s achievements as a true figurehead of pop and rock music, especially in the 1960s and ’70s, are now widely acknowledged. His talents have been celebrated of late in the highly recommended musical All Or Nothing — The Mod Musicalwhich brings the Small Faces’ story vividly to life and continues to play to massive response.

Marriott, from Manor Park in the East of London, was a born performer. He started his first band at the age of 12 and starred on the West End stage in Lionel Bart’s hit production of Oliver! at just 13.

His dreams came true when the Small Faces, formed in 1965, made it big and enjoyed several years of hit singles and increasingly influential and experimental albums. Marriott’s wanderlust and disillusionment with the business of music led him to leave the band and form Humble Pie. There, he developed a creative partnership with a new group of like-minded players, including Peter Frampton. “It was the best band you could ever be in as far as I was concerned,” said Frampton, “because you’ve got my idol there.

Formed by Steve Marriott in 1969 after the break-up of Small FacesHumble Pie epitomised the British rock supergroups emerging at the turn of the decade. With the charismatic Marriott taking on frontman duties, he enlisted Peter Frampton (then of The Herd) on guitar, Spooky Tooth’s Greg Ridley on bass and a teenage Jerry Shirley on drums. The group released two beloved albums on Small Faces’ former label, Immediate, before making a switch to A&M in 1970 and working up a harder, blues-rock sound that would earn acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic.

The group’s self-titled effort, released in summer 1970, solidified their new direction and set Humble Pie up for a run of albums that would make an indelible mark on the blues-rock scene, among them Rock On, Smokin’ and the classic live double-album, Performance Rockin’ The Fillmore, recorded at New York’s iconic Fillmore East, before the group temporarily disbanded in 1975. Steve Marriott fronted Humble Pie from 1969 to 1975, and briefly in a reunited version in the early 1980s. He also made some notable albums in his own name, including the 1976 solo debut Marriott1990’s Marriott & Band included versions of his treasured Small Faces songs ‘All Or Nothing’ and ‘What’cha Gonna Do About It.’

Shortly before the end of his life, Marriott was interviewed and he reflected with quiet satisfaction on his career. “I was seduced at 18,” he said, “and it was quite good but it paled very quickly. I realised it had nothing to do with music and everything to do with the shape of your bum…what’s been has gone, and I’m very proud of it.

“I’ve got what I wanted, which is just enough money to live on, in no great style but a nice way, and to have some respect from other musicians and play the pubs and clubs, where the music’s still real.

Humble Pie A&M Years Vinyl Box Set

Steve Marriott and Greg Ridley are with us no more, but with the full input of both Frampton and ShirleyThe A&M Vinyl Box Set 1970-1975 commemorates their great work. Collecting all seven of the group’s A&M albums across nine slabs of 180g vinyl, it presents this part of the group’s legacy in better-than-ever audio

“Eat It, in particular, had sound problems originally,” says Jerry Shirley, who adds that they have “now been eradicated once and for all, so that our fans, old and new, can hear it as was it was intended to be”. Much love and care has been put into assembling the package too, with the albums coming in a hardback slipcase and replica artwork – including the die-cut sleeve that originally housed Thunderbox.

Jerry and I worked together with A&M for some time to get this released,” Peter Frampton notes, adding, “We pay tribute to our two lost brothers, Steve and Greg, and hope you enjoy this as much as we did putting it all together.

Live At Winterland

First and foremost, to have this album on vinyl – is incredible! because as you’ll clearly hear – this baby rocks! Humble Pie had to rock because they followed a blazing performance by Slade. From a concert on May 6th, 1973 at San Francisco’s Winterland Theatre. Opening this show was a little known band then named Steely Dan. Marriott is on fire from the fist note to the last.
there is more material from this show, maybe so. Most gigs from this time period, however, did not run too much over an hour’s worth of material, especially, when three or more bands shared the bill. My only gripe with this package is the packaging, itself! Open the gate fold & do we get a concert photo of the band at Winterland? No! A generic photo, instead. Winterland has some historic significance that should have been highlighted with some photos of that gig or at least the marquee.

And, why is the included poster that of a gig in Europe? Why not a replica of the hand bill that Bill Graham had reproduced of the gig at Winterland? Cleopatra Records gets an A+ for releasing this on vinyl. The sound is fantastic! Cleopatra Records gets a D for liner notes. Do your homework, guys. This is historical stuff and deserves the full package and better information.

This live recording of Humble Pie was made at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom in May of 1973, during what many consider to be the band’s creative peak. This Winterland show being only the fifth show recorded for the then brand-newly syndicated King Biscuit Flower Hour radio concert series, features a blistering set of material. From “I Don’t Need No Doctor” to the infectious Top 10 hit “Hot ‘N Nasty” this recording features all the essential music from the Humble Pie catalogue. And since the band built their reputation on legendary live shows, is arguably better than anything the band ever did in the recording studio.

Humble Pie first came together on New Year’s Eve, 1968/69. Marriott had just played a disastrous gig with The Small Faces, whose opening act, oddly enough, was Ridley’s Spooky Tooth. Frampton had already left The Herd and was forming a new band with Shirley, a child prodigy drummer, who was only 16 at the time. Marriott called Shirley after the show and asked if he and Ridley could join the new band he and Frampton were assembling. According to Shirley, he couldn’t believe a singer as acclaimed as Steve Marriott was even interested, and was “thrilled” at the prospect of what the new band could achieve.

The band made its debut in April of 1969, but almost collapsed at the onset. Despite the media hoopla surrounding their supergroup status and a slew of critical raves, Humble Pie’s early albums (As Safe as Yesterday Is and Town and Country – both on Oldham’s Immediate label) were not commercial hits. Marriott and Frampton couldn’t decide if the band should move in an acoustic or electric direction, a dilemma that made the initial records hard to market. The band also had to hit the road before they really had time to work out their live show, and early tours were mostly lackluster as a result. Then, in 1970, the tides began to turn.

The band hired Dee Anthony as its manager, who promptly signed them to A&M Records. The band recorded Humble Pie and Rock On in 1970 and ’71, respectively. Both albums forged the band into a solid – and very electric – blues/rock machine. The critics got behind the band en masse, and records began selling in large numbers. By the time the band had recorded and released Rockin’ The Fillmore in 1971, the word had spread: Humble Pie was one of the hottest live band since the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Just then, Frampton decided he didn’t feel comfortable in the band’s hard rockin’ blues direction and left to pursue a solo career. While the most memorable material from Rockin’ The Fillmore (“I Don’t Need No Doctor,” “4 Day Creep” and the soulful remake of Ray Charles’ “Hallelujah I Love Her So”) also appear on this LP, but the versions differ dramatically, as Frampton had since been replaced by Dave “Clem” Clempson.

Though some in the rock press predicted the band’s demise upon Frampton’s departure, the opposite seemed to happen. Clempson revitalized the band, and helped take it in an even harder direction. When the band returned in 1972 with Smokin’, they had become a well-oiled rock ‘n’ roll dynamo. Five of the album’s tracks – “Hot ‘N Nasty,” “30 Days In The Hole,” “Road Runner,” “You’re So Good For Me” and Eddie Cochran’s classic “C’mon Everybody” – soon became radio staples. Smokin’ became a multi-platinum Top 10 smash, and remains the best selling album of the band’s career.

This concert was recorded while the band was promoting Eat It!, a double LP that featured three sides of studio songs and one side of live material. Though Eat It! went to the Top 15, and Humble Pie had firmly established themselves as a powerful live act, the band’s powers (and their popularity) seemed to gradually decline following this tour. The band returned in 1974 with Thunderbox, but the constant focus by the media and the fans on Steve Marriott began taking its toll within the group. In 1975, Humble Pie reunited in the studio with ex-manager Andrew Oldham, and recordedStreet Rats, a quirky collection of tracks, including three Beatles covers. The band embarked on a “Farewell” tour, and called it a day.

Though Humble Pie never quite reached the commercial status of Led Zeppelin or Eric Clapton, they did leave an indelible mark on the contemporary rock music. The passion of Marriott’s blue-eyed soul, the powerful blast of the band’s clever rhythm section, compounded by the skillful guitar work of Frampton (and later, Clem Clempson), will forever keep Humble Pie near the head of the blues/rock class of legends.

Band

  • Steve Marriott – Guitar, vocals.
  • Clem Clempson – Guitar, backing vocals.
  • Greg Ridley – Bass guitar, vocals
  • Jerry Shirley – Drums.

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Alice Mary is classically trained, techno-loving Jimi Hendrix fan who has somehow become a pop musician. Taking inspiration from her varied interests she has created an intriguing debut EP in I Am Here. Like many musicians Alice is an introvert off-stage, but on-stage she commands attention with stark lyrics, impressive guitar playing and memorable, haunting melodies.

Alice Mary began recording music in her bedroom when she was 14 years old. Back then she used a four-track tape recorder, layering guitar parts and quietly singing over the top, hoping no one could hear her voice. But after years of playing guitar for other bands and geeking out making electronic music in her bedroom, she decided to bring her artistic voice to the fore and start her own solo project.

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I Am Here was originally intended to be a set of instrumentals, born from experimenting with recordings of a broken autoharp. Influenced by lyricists like Feist and Conor Oberst, Alice Mary’s songs refuse to shy away from unflattering truths about herself. She explores the confusing feeling of bouncing between extremes: love and hate, passion and apathy, confusion and clarity. Her lyrics lay everything bare; with brevity and a sense of humour she owns up to the selfish, petty and unattractive thoughts most of us are too embarrassed to bring up.

The resulting EP is a confident, sumptuous pop record. Alice Mary’s voice will finally come out of the bedroom studio to take centre stage. “Loving Game” is taken from Alice Mary’s debut EP I Am Here which was released via AM Records and can be heard below.

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also check out the acoustic version available on Bandcamp,

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All songs written, performed, mixed and mastered by Alice Emerson

Early seventies rock ‘super group’ Humble Pie see new vinyl editions of all their A&M released albums collected in the appropriately named The A&M Vinyl Box Set 1970-1975.

The band were formed by Steve Marriott and Peter Frampton in 1969 and also featured former Spooky Tooth bassist Greg Ridley and Jerry Shirley on drums.

This new 9LP box set has been put together in conjunction with Jerry Shirley and Peter Frampton and features remastered versions of Humble Pie (1970), Rock On (1971), Performance Rockin’ The Fillmore (1971), Smokin’ (1972), Eat It (1973), Thunderbox (1974) and Street Rats (1975).

Shirley makes reference to the sound quality for this new box set: “At last we have the extreme privilege, thanks to the hard work of the restoration engineers at Universal, to hear all of our catalogue from A&M in it’s finest form, on vinyl. “Eat It” in particular, had sound problems originally that have now been eradicated once and for all, so that all our fans, old and new, can hear it as it was intended to be, a wonderful slice of Humble Pie Rock & Roll”.

Frampton adds We pay tribute to our two lost brothers, Steve and Greg and hope you enjoy this as much as we did putting it all together.”

The records are pressed on 180g vinyl and feature “replica artwork” which means respecting original die-cut sleeves and inners. The A&M Vinyl Box Set will be released on 2nd June 2017.

Frampton Comes Alive!

40 years ago today, Peter Frampton released “Frampton Comes Alive!” and it became the best-selling album of 1976.

Release on January. 6th, 1976, Peter Frampton released his LP “Frampton Comes Alive!”. The album was recorded in summer and fall 1975, primarily at Winterland in San Francisco and the Long Island Arena in Commack, New York, as well as a concert on the SUNY Plattsburgh campus in Plattsburgh, New York.

The live album was originally intended as a single LP disc, but at the suggestion of A&M Records additional shows were recorded and the album expanded to two LPs for release.

The double album was released in the US with a special reduced list price of most single-disc albums in 1976. The album was pressed in “automatic sequence”, with sides one and four on one record, followed by sides two and three on the other. This arrangement was intended to make it easier to listen through the whole album in sequence on automatic record changers.

We remember when you couldn’t go anywhere and not hear this playing. How many of you still give this record a listen every now and then? Happy 41st Birthday to “Frampton Comes Alive!”!!!

The ’70s were the era of the live album. the ’70s were the live album’s golden age.

The gauntlet was thrown down in May 1970 by a pair of future live classics released only a week apart. The Who‘s Live at Leeds and the triple live album “Woodstock” soundtrack brought the show into kids’ bedrooms better than anything that had come before, and both were rewarded with stellar sales and critical praise. A format that was once reserved for contractual filler or stopgap releases was suddenly fashionable. Before the year ended, the Rolling Stones released Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!”; before the decade ended, we had live releases from the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Ted Nugent and Aerosmith. It was a status symbol, an indicator of commercial clout: The bigger you were, the more likely your discography sported a live album.

In the middle of the decade, another pair of live albums changed the paradigm. Both featured artists whose recording careers were floundering but who did well on the road. With one last chance to catch on with the record buying public. The first was the September 1975 release of Kiss Alive! Three months later (and also sporting an exclamation point), A&M Records released former Humble Pie guitarist Peter Frampton‘s concert masterpiece, “Frampton Comes Alive!”

Frampton was a prodigy who counted David Bowie among his childhood friends. By age 18 he’d already tasted success with the Herd and had formed Humble Pie with Steve Marriott . Together they would record four studio albums before jumping on the ’70s live LP bandwagon with another classic live album “Performance Rockin’ the Fillmore” at the end of 1971. It would be Humble Pie’s most successful album, but the band’s hotshot guitarist was gone before it was even released.

At the tender age of 21, Frampton had two successful bands in his rear-view mirror and a limitless road ahead of him. His first solo album, 1972’s Wind of Changeeschewed the muscular boogie of Humble Pie for a more acoustic, singer-songwriter vibe . Songs like the album’s title cut introduced the new, mellow Frampton while “It’s a Plain Shame” and a cover of the Stones’ “Jumpin’ Jump Flash” seemed tailored for his established fan base. In other words, the album was neither fish nor fowl, and sales were disappointing.