Posts Tagged ‘Weirdo Shrine’

LA LUZ – ” You Disappear “

Posted: March 28, 2017 in MUSIC
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Back in summer 2015, when the world was brighter, La Luz released their second album, the Ty Segall produced album titled “Weirdo Shrine” It feints in the direction of subversive American darkness,  La Luz head to the beach, where they mine a particularly haunted—though miraculously camp-free—form of surf rock.

It’s a sound that translates well to the woods of Oregon, where the quartet brought their big show to a hidden clearing in the middle of the Pickathon Festival.  La Luz rip through Weirdo Shrine’s “You Disappear,” .

Like previous episodes of the Slab Sessions, “You Disappear” was produced by Half Stop Sessions.

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Before he tragically and suddenly died at 25 years old, Ariel Panero was a staple in New York’s vibrant DIY scene. The young promoter’s involvement stretched far and wide, ranging from his work with record label Famous Class to performing with his band Tough Knuckles. Perhaps most notable was his Less Artists More Condos (LAMC) concert series, which saw Panero booking bands to play unique venues around the city.

After his death in 2010, Famous Class took to honoring his legacy with a series of singles named after LAMC. The A-side of each 7-inch features an unreleased track by a band the label likes. That artist then gets to choose another up-and-coming band they like to be included on the B-side. The 16th edition in the LAMC canon features Seattle surf-noir outfit La Luz backed with Brooklyn garage rockers Scully and will hit stores August 25th. Before the physical release, La Luz has shared their contribution, “Believe My Eyes”.

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The track was recorded during the band’s sessions with Ty Segall for their excellent new album,  “Weirdo Shrines” . Much like the LP, the song smolders with hazy guitar tones and otherworldly harmonies. Frontwoman Shana Cleveland coos mysteriously overtop Lena Simon’s thumping bass line. Keyboards and lead guitar lines intertwine, merging into the surf rock mist. It’s a lovely mix of pop prowess and unsettling fever dream.

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In Spanish, La Luz means “light” and that’s the perfect thing to evoke when your songs give the illusion of veering in the opposite direction. But lift out most any lyric—which is a good excuse to give a closer listen to the delicate, four-part harmonies that are fast becoming the band’s signature—and you’ll find that the aches and pains of love and loss, of living in a world where no foothold is ever a promise—all this is delivered with a nuanced dose of perfectly timed exhilaration, like the whole thing might just be worth it in the end. It’s Alive is the debut LP from Seattle’s La Luz.

 

Seattle’s La Luz play their hit song “You Disappear” for the Ethnic Cultural Hour. Things get weird. from One of my favorite albums of this year. This is the same surfy, harmony-rich La Luz that were sublime on their first LP, but now with even more energy and venom. In early 2015, La Luz adjourned to a surf shop in San Dimas, California where, with the help of producer-engineer Ty Segall, they realized the vision of capturing the band’s restless live energy and commiting it to tape. “Weirdo Shrine” finds them at their most saturated and cinematic — the sound of La Luz is (appropriately) vibrant, and alive with a kaleidoscopic passion

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La Luz is a band in Seattle, WA, started in the summer of 2012 by Shana Cleveland (guitar), Marian Li Pino (drums), Alice Sandahl (keyboard) and Lena Simon (bass). Everyone sings. Songs by Shana and La Luz.  a detour into a sunny California. The New album Weirdo Shrine has a Coachella melody. It vibrates your soul and wants you to stick your feet right into the sand and just chill out on the beach. This is what I would call a more suave female version of Cayucas. You would’ve thought they weren’t even from Seattle with these surfer rhythms and upbeat mood swings from calm to plain out Beating the drum. La Luz, in my opinion, will go down in history as the best all-female beach band.

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Second mp3 single from the album  “Weirdo Shrine”, the new Ty Segall-produced sophomore album by Seattle surf-rock group La Luz, out August 7th on Hardly Art Records. Surf-rock band La Luz’s sophomore album Weirdo Shrine will be released tomorrow, and even with a brief listen it’s clear that it’s an album with passion, skill, and intense emotion. Their track “Don’t Wanna Be Anywhere” seems to best showcase lead guitarist and vocalist Shana Cleveland’s effortless skills, especially considering the mellow, yet refined riffs embedded in flawless lo-fi sound. It’s definitely a track that begs to be understood, so multiple plays are definitely not out of order.

Pre-order Weirdo Shrine

LA LUZ – ” Black Hole “

Posted: August 10, 2015 in MUSIC
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Today is it! Happiest of release days to La Luz — their latest, “Weirdo Shrine”, is out today. Watch a new animated video for “Black Hole, Weirdo Shrine”

What makes Weirdo Shrine interesting is that all this existential dread is wrapped up in classic-sounding surf rock, topped with enough “ooohhhs”, “aaahhhs”, and vocal harmonies to fill your girl group quota for an entire year. Lead singer and guitarist Shana Cleveland tosses out bright, airy guitar riffs, tinged with just the right amount of reverb, as easy as breathing. But the surfer girl guise is a front. If La Luz are a rum punch drink served in a pineapple, be careful lifting the tiny drink umbrella: There’s probably a black widow spider underneath.

It’s frustrating that the record doesn’t fully convey the energy of La Luz’s live shows, where the band members will crowd surf and request the audience make space for a line dance à la “Soul Train”. But if you choose to focus on La Luz’s doo-wop harmonizing, then you’re only looking at the frilly, pink bow that tops the whole package. The undercurrent of darkness in La Luz’s music is what makes their work so fierce and intelligent. You could blink and miss their sneaky, underhanded way of slipping unease into their cheerful-sounding songs. Which is why you should give them more of your attention. Much like a car accident, it’s always the ones we didn’t see coming that hit the hardest.

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First single from Weirdo Shrine, the new Ty Segall-produced sophomore album by Seattle surf-rock group La Luz, out August 7th on Hardly Art records. What makes Weirdo Shrine interesting is that all this existential dread is wrapped up in classic-sounding surf rock, topped with enough “ooohhhs”, “aaahhhs”, and vocal harmonies to fill your girl group quota for an entire year. Lead singer and guitarist Shana Cleveland tosses out bright, airy guitar riffs, tinged with just the right amount of reverb, as easy as breathing. But the surfer girl guise is a front.

Nowhere is this more apparent than the ballad, “I’ll Be True”. Cleveland croons, “No one else treats me like you do/ And I’ll be true to you/ Just as long as you want me to,” while keyboardist Alice Sandahl tries to wrestle the good name of organ solos from the hands of Ray Manzarek. But the lingering effect of the song is not the declaration of loyalty, it’s the minor chord progression that blends with the ladies’ descending voices. It begs the question: If the love in the song is so pure and innocent then why does it come tinged with such eeriness?

La Luz recorded It’s Alive in the back of their friend’s trailer. For Weirdo Shrine, producer Ty Segall constructed a makeshift studio out of an old surfboard factory. At first, this tactic can come across almost like a cheap gimmick, a soundbite for press releases. But once you realize Segall also chose to keep a persistent hissing overlay on the entire record (it’s hard to ignore once you hear it)—the occasional, lingering odd note or glitch will also tend to appear during the transitions between tracks—his methods become less a cute anecdote, and more a way to keep the group firmly grounded in their DIY roots. The ladies might have perfect pitch, but this is not an album for cleaning up mistakes.

It’s frustrating that the record doesn’t fully convey the energy of La Luz’s live shows, where the band members will crowd surf and request the audience make space for a line dance à la “Soul Train”. But if you choose to focus on La Luz’s doo-wop harmonizing, then you’re only looking at the frilly, pink bow that tops the whole package. The undercurrent of darkness in La Luz’s music is what makes their work so fierce and intelligent. You could blink and miss their sneaky, underhanded way of slipping unease into their cheerful-sounding songs. Which is why you should give them more of your attention.