Posts Tagged ‘Steven Wilson’

Jethro Tull’s entrance into the ’80s, simply titled A, is getting a reboot four decades after its original release. The album introduced a new sound and a new line-up, including Dave Pegg and Eddie Jobson (who features prominently on keyboards and violin). To celebrate, a new six-disc version of the album,A (A La Mode) 40th Anniversary Edition, will be released on April 16th. After their successful and eclectic trilogy of albums in the late ’70s – Songs From the Wood (1977), Heavy Horses (1978) and Stormwatch (1979) – Jethro Tull returned at the start of the new decades with not only a different mindset, but a different line up as well. 

A was originally recorded solely by the band’s founder Ian Anderson. (The album’s title is derived from the initial tapes, labeled A for Anderson.) But after hearing the more modern, synthesizer-based sound, the group’s label, Chrysalis, decided to release the LP under the Jethro Tull name, noting that this was the direction it wanted the band to head in.

Only two Jethro Tull members play on the album: Anderson and guitarist Martin Barre. Keyboardist John Evan, organist David Palmer and drummer Barrie Barlow had already left the band following bassist John Glascock’s death. For A, the new lineup recruited Dave Pegg as the replacement bassist, Mark Craney on drums and guest performer Eddie Jobson (Roxy Music, Frank Zappa). Even though the album wasn’t a hit, the subsequent tour fared well with fans.

In addition to a relaunch of the original album, newly mixed by esteemed producer Steven Wilson, the three-CD, three-DVD anniversary collection will also feature previously unheard studio renditions, a remixed version of the 1981 Slipstream video collection and unreleased live recordings, including a full concert from the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena recorded in August 1980. The original album has been expanded with five unreleased tracks from the recording sessions, including a different take of the single “Working John, Working Joe”, an extended version of “Crossfire” and the outtake “Coruisk”

A (A La Mode) 40th Anniversary Edition also includes a live recording from November 1980 of the band’s full concert at the LA Sports Arena. The performance mixed new A tracks (“Black Sunday, Batteries Not Included” and “Uniform”) with older hits, like “Aqualung, Heavy Horses” and “Songs From The Wood”. A few of these live tracks first appeared in 1981 on Slipstream, a video collection originally released on VHS and Laserdisc. The full Slipstream video, which made its DVD debut in 2004, is also included in this anniversary edition and has been newly remixed by Steven Wilson.

 

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of one of Jethro Tull’s most radical musical departures, a 3CD/3DVD casebound book deluxe edition of A
Contents:
– The original album and associated recordings remixed in DTS and Dolby AC 3, 5.1 Surround, and stereo 96/24 LPCM  by Steven Wilson
– A full concert from the LA Sports Arena recorded in August 1980 mixed by Steven Wilson in DTS and Dolby AC 3, 5.1 Surround, and stereo 96/24 LPCM
–  A flat transfer of the original 1980 master at 96/24 LPCM stereo
–  Five unreleased tracks from the recording sessions (including the unreleased track Coruisk)
– A DVD of the Slipstream video remixed by Steven Wilson in DTS and Dolby AC 3, 5.1 Surround, and stereo 96/24 LPCM
– A book filled with an extensive history of the album, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson, rare photographs and more.

Jethro Tull, ‘A’ (A La Mode) The 40th Anniversary Edition Track Listing
Disc One: Original Album and Associated Tracks (Steven Wilson Stereo Remix)
Disc Two: Live at the LA Sports Arena 1980 (Part 1) (Steven Wilson Stereo Remix)
Disc Three: Live at the LA Sports Arena 1980 (Part 2) (Steven Wilson Stereo Remix)

skylarking_cdblu

Following the identity detour of the Dukes of Stratosphear, XTC hunkered down to make their next “proper” album with producer Todd Rundgren. On paper the match made in heaven became the stuff of legendary head-butting between artist and producer Rundgren’s appointment secured the savvy pairing of two brilliant and doomed minds. Between the anglophile producer and songsmith Andy Partridge were a thousand common interests and one great chasm that would subsume egos and tear up the studio floorboards. The rift did not concern taste or etiquette so much as In one corner, the shaggy-haired, acid-frazzled Philadelphian whose passive-aggression belies a loose, honky-tonk approach to life; in the other, a three-piece reputed for 1) turning down their record label’s cocaine and 2) crafting technically brilliant pop. It was a match made in some 5-star hotel-lobby hell, and the calamity of it all enriches every second of Skylarking.. The masterful chamber-pop of XTC’s 1986 album Skylarking was one of the band’s finest hours. ‘Skylarking’ is loaded with classic songs like “The Meeting Place,” “Earn Enough For Us,” “Big Day” and “Dear God,” a song left off the original LP but issued as a b-side. It was later added to the lineup when it became a surprise rock radio hit.

Rundgren was optimistic about working with XTC. A few years earlier, he had caught the Swindon group in their element, twisting from off-brand punk toward whip-smart new wave. Soon after, in 1982, Partridge suddenly quit touring, suffering from valium withdrawal and on-stage panic attacks. He announced XTC would join the ranks as a studio outfit, a commercial disaster, to nobody’s surprise. Singles flopped, fans lost faith, and before the year was up, the group shrank to a trio when drummer Terry Chambers stormed out for good during a rehearsal.

Virgin Records had hoped an American producer would collar the firebrand and hammer the new album into the transatlantic mold of U2 and Simple Minds—a notion that, like almost everything involving the label, Partridge found this laughable. Consider the demos: Back-garden symphonies like “Summer’s Cauldron” and “Season Cycle,” among his ripest compositions to date. Fellow songwriter Colin Moulding, inspired by his move to the ancient Celtic settlement of Marlborough Downs, was clomping down the same path, composing pastorals like “Grass” and “The Meeting Place” from sampled lathes and thrums of pagan folk. Hatching a plan, he accepted Virgin’s $150,000 fee and quickly discarded dozens of the band’s demos, assembling a tracklist around a concept of his own. The song cycle would plot a lifetime over the course of a day: daybreak in “Summer’s Cauldron,” then a suite of infatuation, heartbreak, marriage, temptation, and existential reckoning that concludes—on “Dying” and “Sacrificial Bonfire”—in the dead of night. Guitarist Dave Gregory, a Rundgren superfan, was thrilled, and the docile Moulding—by now immune to Partridge’s arm-twisting—sided with Virgin, reasoning they all had mouths to feed.

As war raged, the sessions remained a spring of wonder. Moulding, a psych-pop reformist, came into his own with songs like “The Meeting Place,” reflecting Swindon’s rituals and industry in gorgeous stained glass. Partridge specialized in the melodic trapdoor, establishing awkward patterns and flooding your serotonin receptors at unexpected moments. The lyrics are just chewy enough to distract from each incoming sugar rush, creating endless replay value. (“Who’s pushing the pedals on the season cycle?” he quips wonderfully in “Season Cycle.”) Themes and images trespass between songs, from the vaudevillian pomp of “Ballet for a Rainy Day” into the melodramatic “1000 Umbrellas,” whose Dave Gregory string arrangement makes heartbreak seem an ancient, noble fate.

It’s been a busy few years for XTC‘s 1986 album “Skylarking” wth the vinyl reissue back in 2010, the ‘corrected polarity’ CD of 2014, this year’s boxed deluxe vinyl version and now – thanks to the discovery of the multi-tracks – a double-disc 30th anniversary definitive edition which delivers a Steven Wilson 5.1 surround mix on blu-ray audio, along with a wealth of other bonus material.

This new edition eschews the pubes (not a phrase I’ll write too often) and restores the original sleeve (“it was agreed that more people recognised this as the sleeve now” Andy Partridge replied on twitter, when quizzed about it) and offers a new stereo mix of the album on CD

XTC studio recording ‘ Little Lighthouse’ from the Todd Rundgren produced “Skylarking” sessions, newly mixed by Steven Wilson. Track taken from “Skylarking 30th Anniversary Definitive Edition CD + Blu ray” .
“This was destined for the ‘Dukes’ from the outset really. It was sent to Todd along with all the other “Skylarking” demos and even though we tried recording it in San Francisco (its spiritual home!), it was never going to fit with all of its pastoral playmates.”

Lead single “Grass” bombed in the UK, and the album sales stalled. A death sentence even by their commercial standards, albeit grim vindication for Partridge. But in America, a one-time single contender demoted to a B-side was making itself known especially on college radio, “Dear God” had sparked a moral panic: its narrator, griping with an absent god, appalled Bible Belt Christians and prompted a bomb threat to a Florida radio station. Everyone else seemed to love it. In a sheepish U-turn, the band’s American label, Geffen, smuggled the track onto the U.S. release of Skylarking. Over six months, the album outsold XTC’s entire prior catalogue three times over.

Moulding, who stepped back from XTC in 2006, effectively ending the group.) Among his arsenal of guitars, Partridge now keeps company with a legion of toy soldiers,

If you’ve bought any of the previous XTC CD+blu-ray reissues, you’ll know how good they are and what to expect… The blu-ray here offers the 5.1 mix, the new stereo mix in 24bit/96kHz, four additional songs from the album sessions in stereo and 5.1, the very original (uncorrected polarity) album mix in hi-res stereo, along with the same for the corrected polarity version, instrumental mixes, a complete alternate album in demo form (following producer Todd Rundgren’s original suggested running order), numerous demo and work tape sessions showing the evolution of the album and the promo films for Dear God and Grass! All that for less than £20 – amazing, as usual.

This definitive edition (for once the title lives up to the content) comes with an expanded booklet featuring sleeve-notes by Andy Partridge, Colin Moulding & Dave Gregory and will be released on 14th October 2016. the original was Released 27th October 1986.

October 17th, 2016: It’s here, the one you’ve been hankering for. Steven Wilson produced these mixes with the input of founder band member Andy Partridge and the full approval of the band. This CD/Blu-ray edition is presented in special packaging with an expanded booklet and sleeve-notes by Andy Partridge, Colin Moulding and Dave Gregory.

  • CD features the 2016 Steven Wilson stereo album mix plus four bonus tracks mixed by Steven Wilson.

Blu-ray features:

  • A 5.1 Surround mix in 24bit/96khz mixed from the original multi-track tapes available in LPCM and DTS HD MA.
  • The 2016 stereo album mix in 24bit/96khz LPCM audio.
  • Four additional songs from the album sessions in stereo and 5.1 mixed by Steven Wilson.
  • The original (uncorrected polarity) stereo album mix in hi-res stereo, plus 1 non-album track.
  • The original (corrected polarity) stereo album mix in hi-res stereo.
  • Instrumental versions (mixed by Steven Wilson) of all 2016 mixes in 24bit/96khz LPCM audio.
  • A complete alternate album in demo form (as per Todd Rundgren’s original suggested running order based on the demo recordings).
  • Numerous additional demo and work tape sessions showing the evolution of the album and associated recordings.
  • Promo films for Dear God and Grass.

Thanks to http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/

Jethro Tull released their first LP “This Was” on the 3rd February 1969 in the USA. The record was released in the UK in Oct. of 1968. The album was recorded at a cost of only £1200, and it is the only studio album by Jethro Tull to feature guitarist Mick Abrahams. The good reception of the album in the UK permitted the band to perform in the Marquee Club, where other successful British groups started their careers, such as the Rolling Stones and The Who.

“This Was” has the only Jethro Tull lead vocal not performed by Ian Anderson on a studio album, with Mick Abrahams providing the vocals on the track “Move on Alone”.

The song “Dharma for One”, a staple of Tull’s early concerts which usually incorporating an extended drum solo by Clive Bunker, was later covered by Ekseption, Pesky Gee! and The Ides of March.

On “My Sunday Feeling,” the song opens with Mick’s guitar on one channel and Ian’s flute across the way on the opposite channel, in a call-and response pattern. When the vocals begin, we have Ian’s voice on one side, his flute on the other and Mick shoved into the background with the rest of the boys.

On the next track, “Some Day the Sun Won’t Shine For You,” Ian harmonizes with himself on opposite channels with no intention whatsoever of coming close to matching the melody note-for note. This is a good thing, because it’s a song with a front-porch blues feel and precision would have only spoiled it. I should note that the song bears more than a passing similarity to Big Bill Broonzy’s “Key to the Highway.” Broonzy’s original features a slightly faster tempo,The record received generally favorable reviews and sold well upon its release. New Musical Express wrote a positive review in 1968, saying that the album “sounds good and has a lot of humour about it”. About their style, the review said, “They play jazz really, in a soft, appealing way, and have a bit of fun on the side with tone patterns and singing”.

Jethro Tull / This Was: The 50th Anniversary Edition

1968 debut album, This Was, will be reissued as a 3CD+DVD deluxe edition in November with stereo and surround mixes by Steven Wilson and rare recordings.
This 50th anniversary package includes the original album and bonus tracks remixed in stereo by Steven Wilson, live BBC sessions from 1968, the original mix of the album in both mono and stereo, a flat transfer of the US 1969 stereo mix and the original album and bonus tracks remixed by Steven Wilson in 4.1 DTS and AC3 Dolby Digital surround and 96/24 LPCM stereo (‘Love Story’ and ‘A Christmas Song’ are actually presented as 5.1 mixes).

The Jethro Tull reissues should be familiar by now, so this will be presented in the usual DVD-sized book package filled with an extensive history of the album, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson with rare and unseen photographs.

This Was: The 50th Anniversary Edition will be issued on 9th November 2018.

The underappreciated period between King Crimson’s genre-defining 969 debut and their John Wetton era is the subject of a new box set titled “Sailors’ Tales”.

The 27-disc set includes new stereo remasters of the albums  In the Wake of Poseidon (1970), Lizard (1970) and Islands (1971). The extras include an expanded version of 1972’s Earthbound, featuring 1972 live recordings; six discs of 1971 concerts recorded in Germany and the U.K.; and nine discs of recordings from King Crimson’s U.S. tour in 1972 – many of which have never been released before.

Sailors’ Tales is rounded out by four audio Blu-rays and a pair of DVDs featuring concert footage and hi-res versions of the material found elsewhere on the box. The booklet features reproduced memorabilia and new liner notes written by Sid Smith, current Crimson member Jakko Jakszyk and David Singleton.

Sailors’ Tales, which is due on November. 3rd, “documents a crucial period in King Crimson’s history, and shows it to be brimming with innovation, experimentation and boundary-pushing energy,” a news release says.

Islands [VINYL]

The box set follows King Crimson’s unexpected return with a lineup that includes early ’70s member Mel Collins. Songs from In the Wake of Poseidon, Lizard and Islands have since become a regular part of their set lists.

King Crimson have another round of tour dates scheduled for the autumn.  They played internationally last summer with a double-quartet format before leader Robert Fripp reconnected with longtime member Adrian Belew, who is expected to join in future Crimson shows.

Lizard (30th Anniversary Edition)

The complete 1970-72 era King Crimson captured on 21 CDs, 4 blu-ray discs and 2 DVDs (all audio content) and presented in a 12” box with booklet, memorabilia, a further downloadable concert. The Box Set Including the Steven Wilson and Robert Fripp stereo mixes of In The Wake Of  The PoseidonLizard and Islands – and the 5.1 mixes of all those albums – Sailor’s Tales features a wealth of previously unheard studio recordings – from band rehearsals to alternate mixes – alongside a vast array of live material

In The Wake Of Poseidon

This limited edition set presents the complete King Crimson recorded history of the period in the best quality audio possible. 

Pre-order for 3rd November release. 

Marillion’s classic 1985 studio album Misplaced Childhood, which features the hits Kayleigh and Lavender, will be reissued as two deluxe editions in June, including a five-disc set that will feature a lossless 5.1 remix of the album created by producer, musician and surround maestro Steven Wilson .
The 4CD+blu-ray package features a newly remastered edition of the album, a concert from Holland across two CDs (including Misplaced Childhood performed in its entirety) and a fourth disc of demos and rarities “remastered exclusively for this set”. These demos were previously issued on the 1998 two-CD deluxe of the album. The October 1985 concert was recorded Live at the Muziekcentrum Vredenburg in the city of Utrecht. It’s all previously unreleased except for Chelsea Monday which was the B-side to third single, Heart Of Lothian.

In addition, to the surround sound version of the album (hi-res 96kHz 24 bit), Kayleigh B-side Lady Nina has also been mixed to 5.1 and there’s also a new stereo remix of that track as well (this also features on CD 4 along with the original mix of Lady Nina). Note, the album itself isn’t presented as a new stereo remix since this was an instance where Wilson felt the original couldn’t be bettered.

On top of all this great content, the blu-ray delivers an hour-long documentary about the album and promo videos for the singles Lavender, Kayleigh, Lady Nina (which was the A-side to US EP Brief Encounter) and Heart Of Lothian.

The 4LP vinyl deluxe edition features the the newly remastered version of the original album and the entire concert from Holland. The four LPs are pressed on 180g vinyl and presented in a 12” x 12” lift-top box. This comes with a 24-page booklet which contains replica tour program and extensive writing on the history of the album.

These two physical deluxe editions of Misplaced Childhood will be issued on 21st July. Album-only versions of the newly remastered original album will follow on CD and LP later in the year. Signed editions are these are available via the Marillion and Fish websites!

The entire five-disc deluxe edition is presented in a case-bound ‘bookset’ that includes a 60-page booklet with sleeve notes written by Dave Everley.

thanks to SDE

Jethro Tull excellent deluxe reissues continue with a 40th anniversary five-disc edition of 1977’s Songs From The Wood due to be released next month.

This celebration of Jethro Tull’s tenth album follows a similar pattern to previous reissues, with the first disc containing a Steven Wilson remix followed by some ‘associated recordings’ including the previously unreleased Old Aces Die Hard and Working John, Working Joe.

CDs two and three offer 22 track live tracks, recorded on the Songs From The Wood Tour across two American dates, (Boston on 6th December 1977  and Maryland on 21st November 1977). These unheard tracks have been remixed to stereo by Jakko Jakszyk and are completely unheard.

There are two DVDs in this set. The first contains a 5.1 surround sound mix (DTS and Dolby 5.1) and 96/24 LPCM stereo versions of the both the original and Steven Wilson remixed version of Songs From The Wood. This DVD also features selected associated tracks, as well as various quad mixes and flat transfers.

The other DVD contains video footage from that Maryland gig of 21st November 1977. These visuals apparently come directly from the film that was played on the big screens in the venue and has never been seen since! The audio has been mixed to stereo and 5.1.

As before this is presented as a ‘bookset’ and has 96-pages of writing on the album including  a track-by-track annotation of the album and associated recordings by Ian Anderson.

This five-disc deluxe edition of Songs From The Wood will be released on 19th May 2017 with vinyl and standalone CD versions to follow in July. Great value as usual –  as well as the links below it’s available from Burning Shed for less than £20.

Parlophone

“Stand Up” marked an early turning point for Jethro Tull, as their second album introduced folk-rock influences into what had previously been a sturdy blues-based sound. It also marked the first studio collaboration with Barre, a guitarist who would become Tull leader Ian Anderson‘s longest-running bandmate.
In a recent interview, Anderson selected Stand Up as his favorite Tull album, “because that was my first album of first really original music. It has a special place in my heart.”
The album topped the U.K. charts, and earned gold-certification status in the U.S. You can buy Stand Up: Elevated Edition, now

Check out Jethro Tull‘s “Bouree: Morgan Version,” a previously unreleased song, from the expanded reissue of “Stand Up“.
The new set, called the “Elevated Edition,” features two CDs of music and a DVD. The first disc features Steven Wilson’s new stereo mixes of the original 1969 album, paired with rare recordings like “Bouree.” There are also four additional songs recorded at the BBC, as well as stereo single mixes of “Driving Song” and “Living in the Past.”
The second disc in the Stand Up: Elevated Edition set finds Jethro Tull performing live in Sweden, just a few weeks after Martin Barre joined the band. Highlights from the evening’s set list include two cuts from Stand Up, plus songs originally found on the band’s debut album. Another Wilson remix, this time in surround sound, is included on the DVD along with concert footage from January 1969 and other goodies.

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Atlantic

An expanded edition of Tales From Topographic Oceans will arrive just as Yes complete a tour featuring music from this 1973 epic.

Overseen by Steven Wilson, the new update will be available in high-resolution stereo and 5.1 surround in both a three-CD/Blu-ray audio configuration and as a two-CD/two-DVD audio set. They are due on July 29th, Aside from Wilson’s new mix of the original two-disc album, extras include an unedited and extended version of “Dance of the Dawn.” There are also five new single edits meant to provide new insight into the individual sections of the larger musical set pieces that make up.

 

The band’s Album Series tour featuring sides one and tour from the album, as well as the 1980 LP “Drama” in its entirety, has dates scheduled through September. 4th. The tour starts in Columbus, Ohio. USA.

Wilson worked with a tape source that’s thought to be the earliest original-mix master in digital. The Blu-ray disc includes instrumental-only versions of the songs, as well as a full alternative album with a different run-through of side two and a previously unheard live set of side four. Highlights include an unreleased live take on “Ritual” from 1974, and a different studio take of “High the Memory.”

The Roger Dean art has also been expanded and restored. Sid Smith wrote new liner notes, and the set includes new interviews with vocalist Jon Anderson, Alan White and Guitarist Steve Howe, along with rare photos, memorabilia and expanded session notes.

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“Tales From Topographic Oceans” is the fifth in a series of expanded Yes editions including 5.1 Surround mixes, new stereo mixes and High-Resolution stereo mixes of the original music. Additionally, both sets add extra material mixes on CD, while the Blu-Ray edition adds a wealth of extra audio material. Steven Wilson has produced the new mixes with the approval of the band. Both editions feature restored artwork overseen and approved by Roger Dean with an expanded booklet containing new sleeve-notes, photos and archive material making this the definitive edition of the album.

Speaking about this release, Steven Wilson said “I worked on and off for about 3 years on this new mix in my quest to do it justice. I hope it will satisfy the people who agree with me that it may just be Yes’s pre-eminent masterpiece.”

He also recently pointed out that multitrack tapes are unavailable for the other key albums in the Yes catalogue, so “unless that situation changes”, this will be the final release in the series.

• CDs features a completely new stereo album mix by Steven Wilson, a new mix of Dance of the Dawn and five new single edits (both editions).
• Hybrid DVD-As feature 5.1 Surround mixes and High Resolution Stereo mixes of the album mixed from the original multi-track tapes along with the original mix of the album – all at 24/96.
• Blu-Ray features all of the above – 5.2 mixes in DTS-HD MA, new mixes at 24/96, original mixes at 24/192 in LPCM Stereo + additional music including new instrumental mixes, new single edits, a complete album of alt takes (including two previously unreleased sides – one studio, one live) and needle-drops of an original UK vinyl pressing and a US banded promo album pressing.
• Special packaging for both formats, CD/DVD-A set in two double digi-packs in slipcase, CD/Blu-Ray in two mini vinyl replica gatefold card sleeves in slipcase.
• Additional CD in Blu-Ray edition allows for the inclusion of the complete alternate album takes on CD.

Find out more at yesworld.com/discography/tales-topographic-oceans/