Posts Tagged ‘Paranoid’

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Although it wouldn’t appear on American record store shelves until the early months of 1971, Black Sabbath’s seminal sophomore album, “Paranoid”began invading the U.K. (and Europe) on September. 18th, 1970. It quickly raced up the charts in many countries and reached an astonishing No. 1 in the band’s homeland.

Paranoid proved that the wholly unexpected Top 10 success enjoyed by the Birmingham quartet’s modestly recorded self titled debut released barely six months prior, had been anything but a fluke. For vocalist Ozzy Osbourne, guitarist Tony Iommi, bassist Geezer Butler and drummer Bill Ward, Paranoid was just a hastily assembled collection of the best songs they had to offer, even as they were learning to cope with a hurricane of fame, well beyond their wildest expectations. Black Sabbath released ‘Paranoid’ their second studio album in the US. The album features the band’s best-known signature songs, including the title track, ‘Iron Man’ and ‘War Pigs’. The album was originally titled War Pigs, but allegedly the record company changed it to Paranoid, fearing backlash from supporters of the ongoing Vietnam War.  Its sales were enhanced by the success of the “Paranoid” single. “That single attracted screaming kids,” Iommi recalled in the liner notes to Reunion in 1998. “We saw people dancing when we played it and we decided that we shouldn’t do singles for a long while after that to stay true to the fans who’d liked us before we’d become popular.

But at least the four young men knew better than to mess with their winning formula. They once again retained producer Roger Bain and, other than enjoying the luxury of spending more time in the studio (versus the frantic 24 hours afforded to their debut), also maintained their songwriting penchant for wanton, unrefined musical power. Their lyrics avoided pop music’s traditionally pithy stories of love and lust in favor of more desperate subjects steeped both in the occult and real-life terrors.

To wit, Paranoid’s opening epic “War Pigs” started out named “Walpurgis,” before lyricist Butler swapped satanic ritual for equally evil warmongering. The future doom standard “Iron Man” shrouded apocalyptic allegory under the guise of dark fantasy, while “Electric Funeral” cut right to the chase. The terrifying “Hand of Doom” contained graphic warnings about heroin addiction.

Even a song as surreal-seeming as “Fairies Wear Boots” was actually inspired by run-ins with belligerent skinheads at the band’s shows. And though Paranoid’s sonic wildcard, “Planet Caravan,” professed science fiction musings over its unnaturally gentle, psychedelic dreamscape, the provocatively named “Rat Salad” was clearly just a platform for Ward to shine, based on John Bonham’s “Moby Dick.”

Finally, there was the bite-sized, frantic title track, which was jammed together so quickly in a fit of spontaneous inspirational combustion, that reading too much into its hastily coupled words is both unwise and, frankly, unnecessary — except to point out how its vague ramblings on loneliness, misery, and general confusion about one’s lot in life once again connected with disenfranchised listeners everywhere.

Needless to say, it was precisely this vast population of marginalized youths, feeling excluded by society, that started flocking into Black Sabbath’s growing fan base around the world, lured by Paranoid’s undeniable destiny to become heavy metal’s definitive watershed.

Nothing has changed since Paranoid‘s release. Heavy metal continues to seduce generation after generation of rebellious kids seeking music they can relate to, and vent their pent-up frustrations and aggression to — all of it facilitated by the thousands of subsequent albums that can trace this fundamental purpose and usefulness to Black Sabbath and their most important career’s achievement, Paranoid.

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Black Sabbath will release a 4-disc deluxe edition of their classic 2nd album Paranoid, featuring alternative mix and live tracks. Black Sabbath have announced a four-disc super deluxe edition of their 1970 second album Paranoid.

It’ll launch on November 11th and is being released to coincide with the band’s final run of live dates on their The End tour, which is scheduled to wrap up in February with two dates in their hometown of Birmingham.

The Paranoid package will include the 2012 remaster of the original album, along with a rare 1974 stereo quad mix. In addition, the set will include two live performances from 1970 in Montreux and Brussels.

It’ll also feature a hardbound book with extensive liner notes, photos, memorabilia, a poster and a replica of the tour book sold during the Paranoid run of shows that year.

It’ll also include new interviews with Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward.

Initially released in 1970, Paranoid featured classic Black Sabbath tracks War Pigs, Iron Man, Electric Funeral, Fairies Wear Boots and the title track, which reached no.4 in the UK singles charts and no.61 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.

The Paranoid Super Deluxe Edition is available for pre-order via Amazon.

It may have been released 46 years ago, but Black Sabbath’s second album has lost none of its unearthly power

Rat Salad

By Sabbath standards, Rat Salad is little more than a throwaway instrumental, but by most other bands’ standards it’s pretty fucking great. 150 seconds of spiralling riffs and muscular oomph, it makes up the numbers on Paranoid to some degree, but still more than justifies its presence on this classic album by demonstrating just how fiery and exhilarating the young Brummies were by this point. Perhaps more interestingly, it has yet to be confirmed whether any of the band have ever actually eaten a rat salad. It doesn’t sound very appetising, but then they were out of their minds on drugs at the time and anything’s possible when the munchies kick in.

Paranoid

Dashed off as a last-minute filler for Sabbath’s second album, Paranoid may not have ever been intended as an immortal anthem for the ages, but that’s what it has indubitably become. As humble as its birth was, it’s a textbook example of a classic heavy rock song: short, to the point, laden with hooks and performed with the kind of urgency and vitality that only young bands with big dreams and tons of confidence can muster. The fact that it’s only the seventh best song on Paranoid is testament to the mind-bending quality of the rest of the album, rather than a criticism of the song itself. Everyone loves Paranoid.

Electric Funeral

It’s an obvious truth that he entire doom metal scene owes its collective arse to Black Sabbath, and to songs like Electric Funeral in particular. Crushing, sinister and wonderfully weird, this is a song that still sounds like the end of the world slithering towards us (and given the state of the planet at this point, we deserve nothing less). Lyrics like ‘Robot minds of robot slaves lead them to atomic rage’ and ‘Earth lies in death bed/Clouds cry water dead’ ensure that the apocalyptic vibe is virtually chewable throughout, and the way that Sabbath switch from debilitating dirge to bursts of nimble, mutant blues fury still has the power to take the breath away. May all our funerals be this electric.

Planet Caravan

They may have struck fear into the hearts of polite, Christian folk everywhere with their evil riffs and uncontrollable facial hair, but Black Sabbath were hippies at heart and Planet Caravan remains their finest ever attempt to tap into the woozy bliss of psychedelia. Satan only knows how much weed was smoked during the recording, but seldom has the notion of drifting blearily through the cosmos with one’s true love ever been so vividly evoked. And while Sabbath’s biggest and most seminal contribution to metal remains Tony Iommi’s riffs, the fact that Pantera covered this song on 1994’s Far Beyond Driven proves that Sabbath’s subtle side has had an undeniably enduring effect on the evolution of heavy music too.

Hand Of Doom

Another song that has been utterly essential in inspiring the doom metal legions, Hand Of Doom is obscenely heavy in every respect: the riffs, of course, are pulverising but it’s the lyrics that make this such a bruising seven-minute crawl through unimaginable horror. Inspired by the drug-ravaged disintegration of US soldiers returning from the Vietnam war, it’s a sustained litany of nightmarish observations set to one of the band’s most ingenious arrangements: ‘Push the needle in/Face death’s sickly grin/Holes are in your skin/Caused by deadly pin’… come on, it doesn’t get much better than that, does it? Extra points for the phrase ‘deadly pin’, which may well have saved a few people from dying in freak sewing accidents.

Fairies Wear Boots

Fairies don’t exist, so their footwear is hardly a matter for sensible discussion, but when you’re in the midst of Paranoid’s mesmerising closing track, it wouldn’t take much to make you believe and head straight for the nearest branch of Foot Locker to do some research on miniature clogs. That aside, Fairies Wear Boots is still a staple in Sabbath’s live sets, and with good reason: this song swings like a megalodon’s ballbag and deftly combines pounding blues rock vibes with a strong sense of pot-addled euphoria that reaches an almost comical peak when Ozzy sings ‘Smokin’ and trippin’ is all that you do!’, thus summing up Black Sabbath’s recreational itinerary with laudable precision. As an added bonus, this is one of the few heavy metal songs that features a dancing dwarf.

Iron Man

One of Tony Iommi’s greatest skills is to write riffs that are as easy to sing along with as the songs’ vocal parts. Whenever the band play Iron Man live, everyone goes apeshit, despite the fact that this is one of Sabbath’s heaviest, slowest and most unashamedly lumbering anthems. Geezer Butler’s lyrics were apparently inspired by Ozzy Osbourne’s observation that the song’s main riff sounded like “a big iron bloke walking about”, which is both brilliant and daft. However, there’s nothing daft about the timeless might of the band’s ensemble performance: this is the sound of heavy metal being forged in real time; immense, unstoppable, ageless and devastating.

War Pigs

46 years on, War Pigs is still one of the most ridiculously thrilling songs ever performed by human beings. You don’t have to be aware of all the noted artists and bands that have covered it – ranging from Faith No More’s straight but scintillating version from The Real Thing through to quirky art punks Alice Donut’s trombone-led demolition on 1990’s Revenge Fantasies Of The Impotent – to see how fundamental this epic and grandiose eruption of heavy, heavy thunder is to just about everything we hold dear in the metal world.

War Pigs is simply part of metal’s sonic DNA, from its bewildering succession of colossal riffs to Geezer Butler’s powerful anti-war lyrics, delivered with youthful aplomb by Ozzy Osbourne: it’s a towering template for intelligent, rampaging heaviness that still sends shivers down the spine of most sensible listeners. And yes, Geezer did rhyme ‘masses’ with ‘masses’, but so what? It’s War Pigs. It rules (and those words do rhyme, let’s face it).

Image result for paranoid single cover

Paranoid is the second studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath. Released in September 1970, it was the band’s only album release to top the UK Albums Chart until the release of 13 in 2013. Paranoid contains several of the band’s signature songs, , Paranoid the single was the band’s only Top 20 hit, reaching number 4 in the UK charts. It is often regarded as one of the most quintessential and influential albums in heavy metal history. Vertigo’s eagerness to capitalise on the success of Sabbath’s debut album, putting the band back in the studio for a follow-up. That record, initially titled War Pigs but changed at the last minute to Paranoid,

46 years ago today Black Sabbath released their single ‘Paranoid’ taken from their second studio album.  The album features some of the band’s best-known signature songs, including the title track, ‘Iron Man’ and ‘War Pigs’. The album was originally titled War Pigs, but allegedly the record company changed it to Paranoid, fearing backlash from supporters of the ongoing Vietnam War. Watch Black Sabbath perform the iconic riff fueled/drum filled “Fairies Wear Boots” off Paranoid live in 1970.

Tony Iommi: The producer said, “We haven’t got enough songs. We need another three minutes.” So Paranoid was made up there and then. It was just a throwaway thing. While everybody popped out for a bite to eat, I came up with this riff.

Geezer Butler laughs as he tells the story of how he and Ozzy both refused to play the song Paranoid when Tony Iommi originally came up with the riff.

Image result for paranoid single cover

“It was right at the end of recording the second album, which was going to be called War Pigs,” he recalls. “We were short on material, and Tony just kind of came up with the riff on the spot. But Ozzy and I thought it was too close to Communication Breakdown by Led Zeppelin. We always loved Zeppelin in them days, sitting round on the floor smoking dope and listening to that first album.

“So when Tony came up with the riff to Paranoid me and Ozzy spotted it immediately and went: ‘Naw, we can’t do that!’ In fact we ended up having quite a big argument about it. Guess who was wrong? The fact that it became such a big hit for us – and is now probably our best known song

Ozzy Osbourne: I remember going home and I said to my then-wife, “I think we’ve written a single.” She said, “But you don’t write singles.” I said, “I know, but this has been driving me nuts on the train all the way back.”

Bill Ward: It was about 1:30 in the afternoon and Tony had the riffs. By 2:00 we had Paranoid exactly as you hear it on the record.

Recorded at Regent Sound Studios and Island Studios in, London

Black Sabbath line-up

Black Sabbath have announced a four-disc super deluxe edition of their 1970 second album Paranoid.

It’ll launch on November 11th and is being released to coincide with the band’s final run of live dates on their The End tour, which is scheduled to wrap up in February with two dates in their hometown of Birmingham.

The Paranoid package will include the 2012 remaster of the original album, along with a rare 1974 stereo quad mix. In addition, the set will include two live performances from 1970 in Montreux and Brussels.

It’ll also feature a hardbound book with extensive liner notes, photos, memorabilia, a poster and a replica of the tour book sold during the Paranoid run of shows that year.

It’ll also include new interviews with Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward.

Initially released in 1970, Paranoid featured classic Black Sabbath tracks War Pigs, Iron Man, Electric Funeral, Fairies Wear Boots and the title track, which reached no.4 in the UK singles charts and no.61 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.

The Paranoid Super Deluxe Edition is available for pre-order via Amazon.

Black Sabbath, Paranoid and Master Of Reality come with rare bonus tracks

Black Sabbath have confirmed their first three albums will be released as deluxe editions in January.

Their 1970 self-titled debut, its same-year follow-up Paranoid and 1971’s Master Of Reality were remastered in 2012 but only previously available in digital format.

Each album comes with a second disc of outtakes and alternate versions, while the launch date coincides with the beginning of their final world tour.

Frontman Ozzy Osbourne recently stated that, although they’d planned to make one more album before splitting, the idea had been shelved. Guitarist Tony Iommi later said it had been bassist Geezer Butler’s decision.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iR-pddN1IQ

Sabbath’s The End tour begins on January 20th in North America and takes in Australia, New Zealand and Europe – including a headline set at Download in the UK – before winding up back in the US on September 21st. The deluxe albums are released on January 22nd. Black Sabbath are the cover stars of the current edition of Metal Hammer, on sale now in print, digital and via TeamRock+.

BLACK SABBATH

DISC ONE

  1. Black Sabbath
  2. The Wizard
  3. Wasp/Behind the Wall Of Sleep/Bassically/N.I.B.
  4. Wicked World
  5. A Bit of Finger/Sleeping Village/Warning

DISC TWO

  1. Evil Woman (Don’t Play Your Games With Me)
  2. Black Sabbath – Studio Outtake
  3. Black Sabbath – Instrumental
  4. The Wizard – Studio Outtake
  5. N.I.B. – Alternate Version
  6. Evil Woman (Don’t Play Your Games With Me) – Alternate Version
  7. Sleeping Village (Intro) – Alternate Version
  8. Warning (Part 1) – Studio Outtake

PARANOID

DISC ONE

  1. War Pigs / Luke’s Wall
  2. Paranoid
  3. Planet Caravan
  4. Iron Man
  5. Electric Funeral
  6. Hand Of Doom
  7. Rat Salad
  8. Jack The Stripper/Fairies Wear Boots

DISC TWO

  1. War Pigs – Instrumental
  2. Paranoid – Alternate Lyrics
  3. Planet Caravan – Alternate Lyrics
  4. Iron Man – Instrumental
  5. Electric Funeral – Instrumental
  6. Hand Of Doom – Instrumental
  7. Rat Salad – Alternate Mix
  8. Fairies Wear Boots – Instrumental

MASTER OF REALITY

DISC ONE

  1. Sweet Leaf
  2. After Forever
  3. Embryo
  4. Children Of The Grave
  5. Orchid
  6. Lord Of This World
  7. Solitude
  8. Into The Void

DISC TWO

  1. Weevil Woman ’71
  2. Sweet Leaf – Studio Outtake
  3. After Forever – Studio Outtake Instrumental
  4. Children Of The Grave- Studio Outtake
  5. Children Of The Grave – Studio Outtake Instrumental
  6. Orchid – Studio Outtake
  7. Lord Of This World – Studio Outtake
  8. Solitude – Studio Outtake
  9. Into The Void (Spanish Sid) – Studio Outtake

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