Posts Tagged ‘Ozzy Osborne’

Black Sabbath final tour, appropriately titled The End. After Ozzy went solo in 1979, there was no reason to think that these guys would ever be on stage together again. The 1985 Live Aid set and Ozzy’s 1992 Costa Mesa concert encore whet fans’ appetites for an inevitable reunion that’s lasted fitfully since 1997. Now, following the 2013 release of their career benchmark album,13,

There were heavy bands before Sabbath. Cream, Hendrix, Zeppelin, Vanilla Fudge, and The Who were all on the scene well before Earth changed its name to Black Sabbath in 1969. But none bore the intent and follow-through of the boys from Birmingham. There are not many acts from the Sixties that have avoided the death of at least one of its founding members. People are now calling The Who, Rolling Stones’ Brian Jones didn’t even make it to the 4th of July in ’69. Only two Beatles remain. The last band anyone would have expected to survive is Black Sabbath.

Sabbath had already recorded its first album of horror-inflected doom* on October 16th. By September of 1970, the second album was out, with themes of paranoia, war, and drug abuse trumping any fancies that peace and love would conquer this brave new world. When the eponymous Black Sabbath album came out on Friday the 13th of February 1970, it was genuinely scary. People left the room when they heard the rain, the church bells, and the ultimate riff. No matter what has come since, nothing has ever been this heavy, produced in a world so utterly unprepared.

Led Zeppelin were the players, but Sabbath were no slouches. This was largely based on myth and the ill-considered release Live At Last. Sabbath weren’t bad musicians But listen to the playing even on their debut. It’s on par with any band short of King Crimson. Geezer is the missing link between Paul McCartney and Steve Harris. Tony’s leads come direct from the source. Ozzy sounds like he was gargling hot honey, and Bill Ward’s chops will make you want to cry. They were a devastating unit then, and they still are today. Bands no longer apprentice themselves like they did in the Sixties. Black Sabbath used to play seven 45-minute sets a night during its residency at the Star Club in Hamburg. Sabbath played more gigs at the Star Club than the Beatles,

After Ozzy was given the boot in 1979 for a lot of really bad behavior, general ennui, and epic levels of alcoholism, Ronnie James Dio came into the fold. The Rainbow singer was everything Ozzy wasn’t: professional, pitch-perfect, a lyricist, and American. Dio made four studio albums with Sabbath, the fourth and heaviest being 2009’s The Devil You Know under the band name Heaven & Hell. When Dio first split from Sabbath after Mob Rules, Deep Purple’s Ian Gillan was brought in to sing on the 1983 Spinal Tap-esque rave up Born Again. And when Dio refused to sing for Sabbath as an opening act at the aforementioned 1992 Costa Mesa gig, Judas Priest’s Rob Halford stepped in to offer some metal god-level pipes to the party. “I’m not doing that.” Dio said, quoted in Iommi’s Iron Man autobiography.

we all know that Sharon will flog Ozzy back onto the road as soon as she’s able, but this was the last proper tour for Sabbath. Maybe they’ll record again. Maybe there will be a farewell show or three. Maybe we’ll even see them kiss and make up with Bill Ward once and for all. But with the contracts signed, Iommi’s ongoing battle with cancer, and all of the guys pushing 70, this tour is the last chance to see three of the founding members of Black Sabbath on tour together.  If you’ve ever made it to the end of “Dear Father”–the last song on 13—you know that it ends right where the band started.

Альбом 13 получил премию Classic Rock Awards — Roll of Honour в номинации «Альбом года» (Album Of The Year). Помимо этого, группа получила премии в номинациях «Событие года» (Event Of The Year) и «Живая легенда» (Living Legends)[104]. Альбом и песня из него «God Is Dead» были номинированы на получение премии «Грэмми»[105] в номинациях: Лучшее исполнение (Best Metal Performance) Лучшая рок-песня (Best Rock Song) Лучший рок-альбом (Best Rock Album)

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The End is a celebration of Black Sabbath’s final hometown concert at Birmingham’s Genting Arena on 4th February, 2017. This unforgettable farewell show from one of the biggest bands in the world will be released by Eagle Vision.
With a hit packed set list including “Iron Man””Paranoid”, “War Pigs” and many more, the high production values, visual effects and pyrotechnics wowed fans, as the band delivered the most emotionally charged show in their history.
The Deluxe Edition is packaged in a hardback DVD sized box containing the DVD, the Blu-ray, the CD of the Angelic Studio sessions and 2CDs of the full length live show with a 32 page booklet and a merchandise pack containing replica laminate, pin badge and plectrums.
A different cut of the show featuring brief interview clips will be shown in cinemas as a “one day only” event on September 28th. Live show and sessions focus on tracks from their seventies albums and include Black Sabbath, Paranoid, War Pigs, Iron Man, Fairies Wear Boots, Snowblind, Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, Children Of The Grave and more.

Ozzy Osbourne Hears “Crazy Train” Master Tape For The First Time, And Can’t Believe His Ears | Society Of Rock Videos

It’s hard to imagine there being anything left in the world that could throw Ozzy Osbourne for a loop – I mean once you’ve snorted ants, and youve bitten the head off a bat you’ve pretty much done everything, but on a recent adventure with his son Jack, life threw Ozzy a serious curveball as it landed him in the studio, staring at something he hadn’t seen or heard in years: his “Crazy Train” master tape.

Co-written by Osbourne and the late guitarist Randy Rhoads, “Crazy Train” as a master tape hadn’t been heard by Ozzy since he actually recorded it in 1980. When Jack suggested he take a listen, he refuses and at first you assume it’s because as a rough mix it’s just a little too rough for Ozzy until he opens his mouth to speak and you realize that it’s not a matter of the mix being too rough – it’s a matter of bringing back memories of guitarist and good friend band member Randy Rhoads, who died two years after the song’s release.

Filmed in a small television studio in Rochester, New York during the Spring 1981 Blizzard of Ozz U.S. Tour.

Shaken and more than a little amazed as he listens to the master tape of “Crazy Train” and talks about his relationship with Randy, Ozzy’s trip down memory lane is a bittersweet one, giving fans and his own son an emotionally charged glimpse into parts of himself that no one is allowed to see. It’s clear that for Ozzy, “Crazy Train” isn’t just a song and the memories attached to its recording sessions are some of the fondest of his career

Rhoads combined his classical music influences with his own heavy metal style. He died in a Plane accident on March 19, 1982 (aged 25) while on tour with Osbourne’s Blizzard Of Oz tour in Florida in 1982. Despite his short career, Rhoads, who was a major influence on the heavy rock scene, is cited as an influence by many guitarists.

Image result for paranoid single cover

Paranoid is the second studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath. Released in September 1970, it was the band’s only album release to top the UK Albums Chart until the release of 13 in 2013. Paranoid contains several of the band’s signature songs, , Paranoid the single was the band’s only Top 20 hit, reaching number 4 in the UK charts. It is often regarded as one of the most quintessential and influential albums in heavy metal history. Vertigo’s eagerness to capitalise on the success of Sabbath’s debut album, putting the band back in the studio for a follow-up. That record, initially titled War Pigs but changed at the last minute to Paranoid,

46 years ago today Black Sabbath released their single ‘Paranoid’ taken from their second studio album.  The album features some of the band’s best-known signature songs, including the title track, ‘Iron Man’ and ‘War Pigs’. The album was originally titled War Pigs, but allegedly the record company changed it to Paranoid, fearing backlash from supporters of the ongoing Vietnam War. Watch Black Sabbath perform the iconic riff fueled/drum filled “Fairies Wear Boots” off Paranoid live in 1970.

Tony Iommi: The producer said, “We haven’t got enough songs. We need another three minutes.” So Paranoid was made up there and then. It was just a throwaway thing. While everybody popped out for a bite to eat, I came up with this riff.

Geezer Butler laughs as he tells the story of how he and Ozzy both refused to play the song Paranoid when Tony Iommi originally came up with the riff.

Image result for paranoid single cover

“It was right at the end of recording the second album, which was going to be called War Pigs,” he recalls. “We were short on material, and Tony just kind of came up with the riff on the spot. But Ozzy and I thought it was too close to Communication Breakdown by Led Zeppelin. We always loved Zeppelin in them days, sitting round on the floor smoking dope and listening to that first album.

“So when Tony came up with the riff to Paranoid me and Ozzy spotted it immediately and went: ‘Naw, we can’t do that!’ In fact we ended up having quite a big argument about it. Guess who was wrong? The fact that it became such a big hit for us – and is now probably our best known song

Ozzy Osbourne: I remember going home and I said to my then-wife, “I think we’ve written a single.” She said, “But you don’t write singles.” I said, “I know, but this has been driving me nuts on the train all the way back.”

Bill Ward: It was about 1:30 in the afternoon and Tony had the riffs. By 2:00 we had Paranoid exactly as you hear it on the record.

Recorded at Regent Sound Studios and Island Studios in, London

Black Sabbath line-up

Black Sabbath have announced a four-disc super deluxe edition of their 1970 second album Paranoid.

It’ll launch on November 11th and is being released to coincide with the band’s final run of live dates on their The End tour, which is scheduled to wrap up in February with two dates in their hometown of Birmingham.

The Paranoid package will include the 2012 remaster of the original album, along with a rare 1974 stereo quad mix. In addition, the set will include two live performances from 1970 in Montreux and Brussels.

It’ll also feature a hardbound book with extensive liner notes, photos, memorabilia, a poster and a replica of the tour book sold during the Paranoid run of shows that year.

It’ll also include new interviews with Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward.

Initially released in 1970, Paranoid featured classic Black Sabbath tracks War Pigs, Iron Man, Electric Funeral, Fairies Wear Boots and the title track, which reached no.4 in the UK singles charts and no.61 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.

The Paranoid Super Deluxe Edition is available for pre-order via Amazon.

Black Sabbath

When Black Sabbath kick off The End world tour next week, fans at each stop will have the chance to buy an exclusive, limited-edition CD. The eight-track album will include previously unreleased material: four outtakes from the 2013 album 13, and four live cuts from the band’s tour in support of it.

You can see the track listing for the CD below.

The disc also features exclusive artwork by Shepard Fairey/Obey Giant, and each stop on the tour will include exclusive posters made especially for each market.

Black Sabbath’s final tour launches in Omaha, Neb., on Jan. 20. After a month of North American dates, the group will head to Australia and New Zealand in mid-April for two weeks of shows. They’ll then play Europe for six weeks starting in early June, before wrapping up the live dates with a month in North America, with a final show now scheduled for Sept. 21st in Phoenix.

The band has said that this will be its last tour, and there will probably be no more new music. Singer Ozzy Osbourne has stated that he doesn’t want to make another Sabbath album, even though guitarist Tony Iommi isn’t against the idea. As Black Sabbath gear up for the big tour, they recently released a sneak peek in the form of a 15-second “Final Tour Rehearsal Teaser,”

Black Sabbath, ‘The End’ CD Track Listing
1. “Season of the Dead”
2. “Cry All Night”
3. “Take Me Home”
4. “Isolated Man”
5. “God is Dead?” (Live Sydney, Australia, 4/27/13)
6. “Under the Sun” (Live Auckland, New Zealand, 4/20/13)
7. “End of the Beginning” (Live Hamilton, ON, Canada, 4/11/14)
8. “Age of Reason” (Live Hamilton, ON, Canada, 4/11/14)

Ozzy Osborne turns 67 today!
What would metal be without its own Prince of Darkness, or without Black Sabbath? Despite (or perhaps because of) his wild antics, his time fronting Black Sabbath and his solo work helped develop the world of heavy metal, and for that we thank him. Happy birthday, Ozzy! Hope it’s a happy and healthy one.

Blacksabbaththeend
After starting nearly five decades ago with a crack of thunder, a distant bell ringing and a monstrous riff that shook the earth.  The heaviest rock sound ever heard, and at that moment Heavy Metal music was born, created by a young band from Birmingham, England barely out of their teens.
The greatest Metal Band of all time, Black Sabbath Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi and Geezer Butler. Bill Ward close the final chapter in the final volume of the incredible BLACK SABBATH story.
BLACK SABBATH’s farewell tour, THE END, begins on January 20, 2016 and it promises to surpass all previous tours with their most mesmerizing production ever.
When this tour concludes, it will truly be THE END, THE END of one of the most legendary bands in Rock ‘n Roll history…  BLACK SABBATH

With the release of Blizzard of Ozz, on Sept. 20th, 1980, Ozzy Osborne initiated one of the most improbable career comebacks in rock history, silencing scores of unbelievers who felt the former Black Sabbath singer could never make it on his own. Ozzy himself was possibily one of those doubters.

So low was Osbourne’s self-esteem after being dismissed by Sabbath, in April 1979, that he would waste months wallowing in self-pity, sequestered in a seedy L.A. motel, while continuing to indulge in his numerous vices. In the end, it took an outcast of similar proportions with his future manager and, then later, wife, Sharon Arden to come to Ozzy’s rescue, at a time when she was looking to break ranks with her father, legendary artist manager Don Arden who, coincidentally was still in charge of Black Sabbath

In each other, Ozzy and Sharon saw something no one else did: hope. And so they started searching high and low for accomplices also willing to take a chance on Osbourne. Though the going was tough and the only label willing to offer a contract was Jet Records,  they eventually found former Randy Rhoads from Quiet Riot a guitar prodigy who amazed Ozzy with his formidable musical talents and songwriting abilities.

Randy Rhoads flew to England in November 1979 to join Ozzy and Australian-born bassist Bob Daisley (ex-Rainbow, Widowmaker, Chicken Shack and Kahvas Jute) for rehearsals in the seclusion of the Welsh countryside, backed by a virtual cavalcade of stand-in drummers.  it was another veteran musician, longtime Uriah Heep drummer Lee Kerslake, who wound up completing the formation informally baptized as the “Blizzard of Ozz” (based on an old suggestion from Ozzy’s dad).

Osbourne’s former bandmates in Black Sabbath had piled on the pressure by delivering a triumphant return to form in Heaven and Hell  their first studio album with the newly aqquired lead singer Ronnie James Dio which bowled over fans and critics and quickly shot into the U.K. Top 10. All this while the Blizzard of Ozz was simultaneously hard at work in rural Ridge Farm Studios, hacking away at their as yet untitled debut.

Osbourne, Rhoads, Daisley, Kerslake and session keyboardist Don Airey produced a stunning set of songs built around Rhoads’ uncanny mastery of classically-trained lead and rhythm guitar work, Daisley’s evocative lyrics, Kerslake’s song-arranging experience, and Osbourne’s inimitable voice and charisma.

Those songs have since become standards of Ozzy Osbourne’s concert performances — especially the explosive call-to-arms of “I Don’t Know,” the ready-made hit single that was “Crazy Train,” the cautionary tale of “Suicide Solution” and the gothic fan favorite, “Mr. Crowley,” which benefited from a timeless cathedral synth intro by the talented Mr. Airey. Nestled amidst these popular all-timers were the heartfelt ballad “Goodbye to Romance” (Ozzy’s sad adieu to Sabbath), a pair of relentless heavy rockers in “No Bone Movies” and “Steal Away (The Night)” and twin showcases of Rhoads’ versatile talents in the acoustic interlude “Dee” and neoclassical epic “Revelation (Mother Earth).”

Blizzard of Ozz — as the album was ultimately named so that Ozzy’s brand could be given top billing gave Osbourne exactly the kind of impressive retort needed to silence his critics and counter Sabbath’s own confident rebirth behind Dio. Blizzard didn’t even gain a U.S. release until March 1981. But it would ultimately win the marathon, selling in excess of 5 million copies worldwide.

Ironically, just weeks after the album’s European release, yet still months away from its arrival in America, Osbourne’s new band was already hard at work recording its follow-up, “Diary of a Madman”.

Blizzard of Ozz — the album — went down as a heavy metal classic. Its songs have remained the very backbone of Osbourne’s solo career, well beyond Rhoads’ tragic death in 1982,

On Thursday, March 18, 1982. Ozzy Osbourne played a concert at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum. The next day, the band was heading to a festival in Orlando, Florida. After driving much of the night, they stopped in Leesburg, Florida, to fix a malfunctioning air conditioning unit on the bus while Ozzy Osbourne remained asleep. On the property there was an airstrip with small helicopters and planes.

Without permission, the tour bus driver and ex-commercial pilot Andrew Aycock took a small Beechcraft F35 plane registered to a Mike Partin. On the first flight, Aycock took keyboardist Don Airey and tour manager Jake Duncan. He then landed and a second flight took to the air with Randy Rhoads and makeup artist Rachel Youngblood aboard. During the second flight, attempts were made to apparently ‘buzz’ the tour bus, where the other band members were sleeping. Aycock succeeded in making two close passes, but botched the third attempt. At approximately 10 AM, after being in the air for approximately five minutes, one of the plane’s wings clipped the top of the tour bus, breaking the wing into two parts and sending the plane spiraling out of control. The initial impact with the bus caused Rhoads’s and Youngblood’s heads to crash through the plane’s windshield. The plane then severed the top of a pine tree and crashed into the garage of a nearby mansion, bursting into flames.

Keyboardist Don Airey was the only member of the band to witness the crash, as the rest were asleep in the bus. Randy Rhoads was killed instantly, as were Aycock and Youngblood. All three bodies were burned beyond recognition, and Randy Rhoads was identified by dental records and personal jewelry.

Randy Rhoads was a very talented guitarist. Before playing with Ozzy Osbourne, Randy played with Quiet Riot. His playing is said to influenced scores of guitarists over the years. Randy Rhodes was only 25 years old. Rachel Youngblood was 58 years old and the pilot, Andrew Aycock was 36 years old.

It was such a senseless waste of human life.

"On Thursday, March 18, 1982. Ozzy Osbourne played a concert at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum. The next day, the band was heading to a festival in Orlando, Florida.  After driving much of the night, they stopped in Leesburg, Florida, to fix a malfunctioning air conditioning unit on the bus while Osbourne remained asleep. On the property there was an airstrip with small helicopters and planes.

Without permission, tour bus driver and ex-commercial pilot Andrew Aycock took a small Beechcraft F35 plane registered to a Mike Partin. On the first flight, Aycock took keyboardist Don Airey and tour manager Jake Duncan. He then landed and a second flight took to the air with Randy Rhoads and makeup artist Rachel Youngblood aboard. During the second flight, attempts were made to apparently 'buzz' the tour bus, where the other band members were sleeping. Aycock succeeded in making two close passes, but botched the third attempt. At approximately 10 AM, after being in the air for approximately five minutes, one of the plane's wings clipped the top of the tour bus, breaking the wing into two parts and sending the plane spiraling out of control. The initial impact with the bus caused Rhoads's and Youngblood's heads to crash through the plane's windshield. The plane then severed the top of a pine tree and crashed into the garage of a nearby mansion, bursting into flames. 

Keyboardist Don Airey was the only member of the band to witness the crash, as the rest were asleep in the bus. Rhoads was killed instantly, as were Aycock and Youngblood. All three bodies were burned beyond recognition, and Rhoads was identified by dental records and personal jewelry.

@[103756296329460:274:Randy Rhoads] was a very talented guitarist.  Before playing with @[5461947317:274:Ozzy Osbourne], Randy played with @[57444548309:274:Quiet Riot].  His playing is said to influenced scores of guitarists over the years.  Randy was only 25 years old.  Rachel Youngblood was 58 years old and the pilot, Andrew Aycock was 36 years old.

It was such a senseless waste of human life.  

RIP Randy, Rachel and Andrew."