Posts Tagged ‘Mickey Finn’

“Something was definitely happening,” said Tony Visconti. “We knew we were getting closer to what we wanted.” The American-born producer was talking about A Beard Of Stars, the album that paved the way for the “Bolanmania” of the early 1970s. The final LP released by Marc Bolan and his band as Tyrannosaurus Rex before they transmuted into T. Rex, it came out on 13th March 1970.

The album was the follow-up to 1969’s Unicorn, after which Bolan took the bold and decisive step of firing musical partner Steve Peregrin Took. His voice was already on some of the new material Visconti had recorded, so the producer had to replace it with new vocals by Bolan. Meanwhile, Took’s successor, Mickey Finn, started to be integrated into the band. Even if Visconti would find him to be less versatile than his predecessor, his good looks were a help, and he played percussion.

In his autobiography, Bowie, Bolan and the Brooklyn Boy, Visconti wrote: “The album was made in a really good atmosphere, helped no end by Finn’s positive spirit, which all led to the sessions being very creative and experimental.” A Beard Of Stars was also the album on which Marc Bolan went electric, playing Visconti’s guitar just before buying his own Fender White Stratocaster.

“A combination of Marc’s growing proficiency on rock guitar and my engineering chops getting better helped the duo sound more aggressive,” remembered Visconti. One single was released from the album, ‘By The Light Of A Magical Moon’; it missed the UK charts, but the album debuted and peaked at No. 21 and totalled six weeks on the bestsellers. It was clear that Marc Bolan was ready to become the pop star figurehead and idol he soon turned into.

“A Beard of Stars” was the fourth studio album by English psychedelic folk band Tyrannosaurus Rex, and their last before changing their name to T. Rex. It was released on 13th March 1970 by record label Regal Zonophone.

Tracklist 1. “Prelude” 1:04 2. “A Day Laye” 1:56 3. “Woodland Bop” 1:39 4. “Fist Heart Mighty Dawn Dart” 2:45 5. “Pavilions of Sun” 2:49 6. “Organ Blues” 2:47 7. “By the Light of a Magical Moon” 2:51 8. “Wind Cheetah” 2:38 9. “A Beard of Stars” 1:37 10. “Great Horse” 1:42 11. “Dragon’s Ear” 2:37 12. “Lofty Skies” 2:54 13. “Dove” 2:06 14. “Elemental Child” 5:33

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At the start of their career Tyrannosaurus Rex had no recording contract but Peel promoted them energetically, mentioning them frequently on air and taking them with him to his gigs in 1967 and 1968. Top Gear’s first producer Bernie Andrews disliked them, but they were booked for a first session on the programme on Peel’s insistence. In late 1967, Track Records rejected some early Tyrannosaurus Rex recordings as “too uncommercial”, causing Peel to express his frustration and to fantasise about issuing a 4 LP set by them on a label of his own which would be called Dandelion Records.But eventually they signed with Regal Zonophone and Peel contributed sleevenotes to their first LP, also reading a fairy story by Bolan at the end of its final track. Bolan became a close friend of Peel and Sheila, but this relationship ended after Bolan became a chart-topping teen idol in 1970-71.

The complete session recorded by T. Rex on 26th October 1970 for John Peel on the Top Gear show on BBC Radio 1 and broadcast on 7th November 1970.

Songs:

1. Ride A White Swan (0:07) 2. Jewel (2:10) 3. Elemental Child (5:41) 4. Sun Eye (13:24)

Recorded at the Progressive Rock Festival at The Sport Halle Koln 4th April 1970 on 1/4″ tape. Marc Bolan Guitar/ Vox & Mickey Finn Percussion. Newly discovered reels of tape produced this rare and outstanding live unreleased performance by Marc Bolan & Mickey Finn in the last few weeks of their Tyrannosaurus Rex incarnation before becoming simply T.Rex. The CD comes in card gatefold sleeve with liner notes by Bolan Society main man Andrew Gardner and packed full of information about the festival and also what was going on with Marc & Mickey at that time. The booklet also includes unseen photos. With a cover designed by Les Clark. Recorded one month after the final Tyrannosaurus Rex LP release Beard of Stars. Tracks from that album included are: Pavilions of Sun, By The Light of the Magical Moon, Organ Blues. All royalties go towards The Marc Bolan School of Music / Light of Love Foundation.

Tracks

1. Hot Rod Mama 2. Debora 3. Pavilions of Sun 4. One Inch Rock 5. By The Light of the Magical Moon 6. Jewel 7. Organ Blues 8. Summertime Blues

T.Rex (The Brown Album) is released in the UK. the fifth studio album by English Glam Rock band T. Rex and the first released under that name since changing their name from Tyrannosaurus Rex. Released by record labels FlyRecords in the Uk and Reprise in the USA. Although the album was credited to T. Rex, all the recordings (as well as the cover shot) were done when they still were Tyrannosaurus Rex, with the two-man lineup of singer/songwriter/guitarist Marc Bolan and percussionist Mickey Finn, although producer Tony Visconti played bass and recorder on a couple of tracks. “Ride A White Swan” was recorded during the same sessions but did not appear on the album. They officially changed the band name to T. Rex to release that single in October 1970

The album continued in the vein of the duo’s previous album A Beard Of Stars with an even further emphasis on an electric rock sound and the addition of strings on several tracks. Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman, aka “Flo and Eddie, sang backup vocals for the first time on a T. Rex song, “Seagull Woman”. They would go on to sing on most of the group’s subsequent string of hits.

The album contained electric reworkings of two old Tyrannosaurus Rex songs, one of which, “The Wizard”, was originally recorded even earlier than Bolan’s pre-T.Rex band Johns Children. The second was an electric version of the second Tyrannosaurus Rex single, “One Inch Rock”, with an intro of scat-singing by Bolan and Finn. The remaining short songs, however, were new material.
At The time of release Ride A White Swan was high in the Charts at number 6 and a UK tour ongoing, yet the song was not included.

T. Rex
Hi-Fly 2
Recorded at Trident Studios, London
Marc Bolan – vocals, guitar, organ, bass
Mickey Finn – vocals, bass, drums, percussion
Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman – backing vocals
Engineer: Roy Thomas Baker
Producer: Tony Visconti
1. The Children Of Rarn (Short Organ version)
2. Jewel
3. The Visit
4. Childe
5. The Time Of Love Is Now
6. Diamond Meadows
7. Root Of Star
8. Beltane Walk
9. Is It Love?
10. One Inch Rock
11. Summer Deep
12. Seagull Woman
13. Sun Eye
14. The Wizard
15. The Children Of Rarn (Short Organ version)

Bolan Paves The Way For Superstardom

 

“A Beard of Stars”  was the fourth studio album by the psychedelic folk rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex, and their last before changing their name It was released on 13 March 1970 by record label Regal Zonophone.“Something was definitely happening,” said Tony Visconti. “We knew we were getting closer to the sound and vision what we wanted.” The American-born producer was talking about ‘A Beard Of Stars,’ the album that paved the way for the “Bolanmania” of the early 1970s. Recorded between April–November 1969 at Trident Studios, London, The final LP released by Marc Bolan and his band as Tyrannosaurus Rex before they mutatad into T. Rex,

The album was the follow-up to 1969’s ‘Unicorn,’ after which Bolan took the bold and decisive step of firing musical partner Steve Peregrin Took. His voice was already on some of the new material Visconti had recorded, so the producer had to replace it with new vocals by Bolan. Meanwhile, Took’s successor, Mickey Finn, started to be integrated into the band. Even if Visconti would find him to be less versatile than his predecessor, his good looks were a help, and he played percussion.

In his autobiography “Bowie, Bolan and the Brooklyn Boy”, Visconti wrote: “The album was made in a really good atmosphere, helped no end by Finn’s positive spirit, which all led to the sessions being very creative and experimental.” ‘A Beard Of Stars’ was also the album on which Marc Bolan went electric, playing Visconti’s guitar just before buying his own white Fender Stratocaster.  It was notable for being the first album on which Bolan used the electric guitar, although that instrument had first appeared on the band’s 1969 single “King of the Rumbling Spires”/”Do You Remember”.  But, “A Beard of Stars”  became the turning point where Marc Bolan began evolving from an unrepentant hippie into the full-on swaggering rock star he would be within a couple of years, though for those not familiar with his previous work, it still sounds like the work of a man with his mind plugged into the age of lysergic enchantment .Four tracks from this album, including “Great Horse”, were salvaged from the spring 1969 sessions for a fourth album with original percussionist Steve Peregrin Took in the wake of “King of the Rumbling Spires”. These four tracks were overdubbed for release by Finn and  Bolan with  Visconti. A further four tracks from the Took sessions rejected for the final album  subsequently surfaced on various compilations, three (“Once Upon the Seas of Abyssinia”, “Blessed Wild Apple Girl”, “Demon Queen”) in Bolan’s lifetime, the fourth (“Ill Starred Man”) posthumously. Other songs recorded around this time may include “Do You Remember” and “Find a Little Wood”

Bolan-Finn

“A combination of Marc’s growing proficiency on rock guitar and my engineering chops getting better helped the duo sound more aggressive,” remembered Visconti. One single was released from the album, ‘By The Light Of A Magical Moon’; it missed the UK charts, but the album debuted and peaked at No. 21 and totalled six weeks on the bestsellers. It was clear that Marc Bolan was ready to become the pop star figurehead and idol he soon turned into.