Posts Tagged ‘Fort Frances’

With Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Langhorne Slim) at the production helm, Alio stretches well beyond Fort Frances’ Americana roots to unlock the potential that’s been building for the past two years with louder guitars, jubilant horns and dueling rhythm sections. 

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We hope you have been enjoying the latest single from Fort Frances, “A Thousand Years From Now.” released at the end of March, and it is an explosion of good vibes that makes us excited to continue putting music into the world. After it was released though, The band started thinking about what will actually occur a thousand years from now. Forget being in a band. We want to be psychics.

Predicting the next millennium is not easy. (Very important note: That is millennium, not Willennium, the acclaimed release from Will Smith that includes classic hits like “Wild Wild West”, “Da Butta” and “Freakin’ It”.) So we have spent the past few weeks combing through dense books about the future, analyzing reports about population trends, talking with government leaders and interviewing technology experts.

With clattering piano, Nile Rodgers-esque guitar chunks and a stomping horn section, the new Fort Frances single is a wake-up call for the information age. Atwood Magazine describes the song as “a lyrical journey of endless news cycles and social media feeds; of theoretically ‘massive’ stories that surrender to the next day’s trend overnight; of a deluge of push notifications, emails and texts.”

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Released January 23rd, 2019
Lyrics & music by David McMillin

Fort Frances

Fort Frances return after two years with the new single and lyric video for “Double Take,” the Fort Frances’ rallying cry and a perfect way to start 2019. The band’s first piece of new material following 2016’s third album Alio and a beachy follow-up single “Summertime,” “Double Take” finds Fort Frances returning to the fore in style with a resounding rejection (that’s right) of the sh*tstorm that’s come to be our daily lives.

“I have been writing these songs as the wheels of the world feel they are falling off,”  says Fort Frances’ David McMillin  “Double Take”  is about stopping the car in the middle of the road to take another look around — to see beyond the headlines and look out to the horizon, to take some extra time and figure out a real direction forward. It’s taken more than two years to me feel like I’m actually capable of taking a breath and letting my brain disconnect from the cycle of did-you-hear-what-happened-now breaking news. Now that I have, I think we have the most complete and cohesive collection of songs Fort Frances has ever finished.”

Together with bandmates Jeff Piper, Aaron Kiser, and Jason Ryan, McMillin takes the audience on a journey of endless news cycles and social media feeds; of theoretically “massive” stories that surrender to the next day’s trend overnight; of a deluge of push notifications, emails and texts:

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With Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Langhorne Slim) at the production helm, Alio stretches well beyond Fort Frances‘ Americana roots to unlock the potential that’s been building for the past two years with louder guitars, jubilant horns and dueling rhythm sections.

As we prepare for our West Coast tour, we decided to record a very appropriate cover: Led Zeppelin’s “Going to California.” You can watch the video right Here. We recorded it in Chicago at the venue where we played our first show five years ago, Schubas Tavern.

In other news, we’ve partnered with the NFL to bring you some limited edition Fort Frances-Indianapolis Colts shirts!.  They will look good on you whether you’re kicking field goals or sitting on the couch.

The West Coast tour starts next weekend in Seattle.

Fort Frances covers Led Zeppelin’s “Going To California”

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From “Alio”, the new Fort Frances release coming  22nd April 2016.

This might be the first time you’re hearing of Chicago rock trio Fort Frances, The band’s strange path to a very specific kind of fame began three years ago, when they released an out-of-character cover of Will Smith’s 1991 classic “Summertime” that racked up over a million YouTube views. in fact, that Fort Frances was invited to the Baltic nation in 2015 to headline one of its biggest summer festivals, Loftas Fest.

Now that they’ve secured a rabid fan base halfway around the world, Fort Frances have another milestone to look forward to: Releasing their first full-length album in five years. Led by vocalist and guitarist David McMillin, the band has gradually shed their Americana roots and morphed into something much more dynamic. Their trip overseas last summer certainly had something to do with this. “Lithuania was a complete refresher for us,” bassist Jeff Piper says. “It gave us a whole new way of looking at the world, and with it came a new way of looking at our own music.” The name of their new album, Alio, means “hello” in Lithuanian, and it very much signifies a new beginning for the trio.

So much is apparent on Alio’s first single, “Building A Wall”. One of the very first demos for the record, it’s a song that has morphed into one of the loudest, most triumphant declarations in the band’s catalog. McMillin originally wrote the song about moving in with his then-girlfriend. “Each of us seemed to have some trouble letting our guards down,” he explains, “but there still seemed to be some borders that weren’t coming down. It’s where the line ‘Memories are not meant to be kept inside a frame’ comes from — we were both stuck on trying to be these people from the past.” It looks like they worked out their issues; McMillin’s then-girlfriend is now his wife.

Musically speaking, McMillin claims that “the last minute of this song is my favorite minute on this record. It’s a balance between these soaring guitar-monies and a gorgeous descending piano line while the chaos of the drums clatter with the image of building walls inside your brain.”

No One Needs to Know Our Name

With that line Fort Frances’ new EP reaches its climax, in the middle of the first single “Anonymous,” and the band announces-without question-their plans to continue evolving. No One Needs To Know Our Name is a leap forward for the Chicago trio, leaning more toward rock than their folk beginnings. Traces of Spoon and Dawes ooze out of every song while singer David McMillin maintains his pop radio-friendly voice.

The biggest similarity between this new EP and some of their older work is the idiosyncrasies that you find all throughout. There’s some phrasing in the lead track “Days Get Heavy” that you don’t hear very often (reminds me a bit of Fiona Apple’s Extraordinary Machine) that betrays the campfire feel produced by the pretty three-part harmonies.

“Best Of Luck” sounds like it could’ve been a Good News For People Who Love Bad News song that just missed the cut. The music overpowers the lyrics a bit, but I like the line at the end, “Your mind takes pictures of everywhere you’ve been, and everything that’s lost can be found again.”

The record may be called No One Needs To Know Our Name, but I think people will want to know Fort Frances once this EP hits. These are five well-crafted tunes performed by guys who’ve been making hits flying under the radar for years. Take some time to listen to The Atlas and Harbor before everyone knows their name.

No One Needs To Know Our Name was released on May 12th.

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The second single from the new Fort Frances EP “No One Needs to Know Our Name.”

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The second single from the new Fort Frances EP “No One Needs to Know Our Name.” 

With that line Fort Frances’ new EP reaches its climax, in the middle of the single “Anonymous,” and the band announces-without question-their plans to continue evolving. No One Needs To Know Our Name is a leap forward for the Chicago trio, leaning more toward rock than their folk beginnings. Traces of Spoon and Dawes ooze out of every song while singer David McMillin maintains his pop radio-friendly voice.

The biggest similarity between this new EP and some of their older work is the idiosyncrasies that you find all throughout. There’s some phrasing in the lead track “Days Get Heavy” that you don’t hear very often (reminds me a bit of Fiona Apple’s Extraordinary Machine) that betrays the campfire feel produced by the pretty three-part harmonies.

“Best Of Luck” sounds like it could’ve been a Good News For People Who Love Bad News song that just missed the cut. The music overpowers the lyrics a bit, but I like the line at the end, “Your mind takes pictures of everywhere you’ve been, and everything that’s lost can be found again.”

The record may be called No One Needs To Know Our Name, but I think people will want to know Fort Frances once this EP hits. These are five well-crafted tunes performed by guys who’ve been making hits flying under the radar for years. Take some time to listen to The Atlas and Harbor before everyone knows their name.

“No One Needs To Know Our Name” will be released on May 12th.

Produced and mixed by Sam Kassirer

For a free download and tour dates, visit www.fortfrancesmusic.com.

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One of those bands that I really want to see are Chicago band rock trio Fort Frances, whose superb debut album “The Atlas” released in 2011 still gets plays and is a forever favourite.

Now back with a new EP, Fort Frances entitled “No One Needs to Know Our Name” and its out May 12th, the effort highlights a brand new side of the band, of its members saying “goodbye to twenty-somethings.” Where “The Atlas” showcased a group playing understated but memorable folk music, “No One” is unquestionably a rock effort, complete with more mature offerings that are nonetheless catchy and fun.

Opener “Days Get Heavy” sets the tone by being a foot-stompin’ anthem with an absolutely hair-raising chorus. The expert songwriting and instantly accessible songwriting continues throughout, from the swooning, heartfelt epic “These Are The Mountains Moving,” the horn-led swing of “Anonymous,” the Spoon-like swagger of “Year of Gold or the infectious pop rock of “Best of Luck.” Partially responsible for the bigger sound is producer Sam Kassirer (Lake Street Dive, Josh Ritter), who recorded the album with the band last fall at his Maine farmhouse. It’s an effort teeming with different ideas.

 

 

 

 

Fort Frances