Posts Tagged ‘Folk Rock’

Live performance of “Make It Holy” by The Staves, the British folk sister act the Staves know how to cast a spell live, as they showed in their recent UK tour  And in a new video, we see what happens when all three Stavely-Taylor sisters stand across from one another in a recording studio. The band’s new album “If I Was”, which they recorded with Justin Vernon, is coming out in a couple of weeks, and they just shared a video of themselves singing the album track “Make It Holy” live in a studio, their harmonies captured in crisp black-and-white
If I Was is The New Album available on Nonesuch Records.

Live In Iowa City, Iowa on June 7, 2013. Richard Thompson thinks of music as a spiritual act and as soon as he picks up a guitar you don’t doubt him. There is a great deal more than flesh and blood and bone about his fingers. Thompson, always the dark horse in those Rolling Stone polls to determine the greatest guitarist of all time, who John Peel liked to call the “best-kept secret in the world of music”, is one of the few artists who derives inspiration from both Sufi mysticism and the back catalogue of George Formby. He has taken lately to playing on stage a not-quite random shuffle from the greatest hits of the past 1,000 years: he channels multitudes.

So today despite the cold and dark days Eliza And The Bear have a new song called ‘Light It Up’. Whatever this London quintet releases it is embedded with the sun so even on those annoying rainy days, they give you an unbreakable silver lining. ‘Light It Up’ takes jubilant hand claps and vocals pitched to the definition of exhilaration, allowing only instant joy to flow from this unstoppable band.

The track received BBC Radio 1 coverage a couple of days ago, and I am pretty sure Eliza And The Bear are on a one track road to instant stardom.

 

Filmed at the end of last year in November 4, 2014 , British alternative-folk rock band, Dry The River, performed live at Brighton Music Hall in Boston. this track  “Hidden Hand” is from Dry The River’s second album, “Alarms in the Heart”, released late last year on Transgressive Records.  

'Alarms In The Heart'

Switching labels seems to have refreshed Dry The RiverNow at home on Transgressive, the band’s new material contains some of their most ambitious moments to date. Their songs are like mini epics rising and falling with Peter Liddle’s  atomospheric vocals with ably supported harmonies within the band. ‘Alarms In The Heart’ released last August , with Valgeir Sigurðsson stepping in for the lavish string arrangements.  In a rare double treat for fans, Dry The River have posted ‘Alarms In The Heart’ online in its entirety alongside a video shot in Iceland during those fateful recording sessions exploring the bands creative process.

Villagers have a third album entitled Darling Arithmeticcoming out on April 10th on Domino Records. It will be the followup toAwayland” it is billed as an “intimate album entirely about love and relationships.”

It was recorded at home in in O’Brien’s farmhouse loft with Conor playing every instrument – guitar, piano, Mellotron and brushes.

It sounds like a stripped-down affair and the first single ‘Courage’ espouses the ideas of the album: “It took a little time to get where I wanted / It took a little time to get free / It took a little time to be honest / It took a little time to be me,” O’Brien sings in plaintive and emotive quiet fashion.

The MISPERS – ” Weekend “

Posted: February 19, 2015 in MUSIC
Tags: , ,

the-mispers-weekend

The Mispers have delivered everything you need for a mid-week pick me up.

This is their new single ‘Weekend’ and sure enough the London five-piece have incorporated that unexplainable Friday feeling. I previously described them as “the hyperactive brilliance that our music scene is lacking” and from the initial guitar riff of ‘Weekend’ you can hear why.

Rhythmic and intoxicating, it is merely seconds before that gorgeous violin (that made me first fall for their elated music) accompanies their swift iconic strum patterns to perfect the sound of exhilaration. I saw the band live last year and with a depleted line up they delivered a wonderful exhilarating set of songs. With vocals replicating the joy of euphoria, The Mispers deliver bursts of ecstasy like MGMT whilst contributing to one idyllic indie rock sound that is temporarily indescribable.

This is one up and coming band that would simply kick it live.

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This Is The Kit is the much beloved musical project of Kate Stables born in England and based in Paris. “Bashed Out” is her band’s third album, the result of an extended period collaboration with the record’s producer Aaron Dessner (Sharon Van Etten, Local Natives). Dessner- the co-founder of the Brassland label–is best known for his work in The National. Indeed, the backing band he gathered for “Bashed Out” combines the talents of This Is The Kit’s touring members (Rozi Plain, Jesse Vernon, Jamie Whitby-Coles), alongside a number of session players drawn from the Brooklyn music scene: Bryce Dessner, Thomas Bartlett (Doveman, The Gloaming), Matt Barrick (The Walkmen) and Ben Lanz (Beirut, The National) all made key instrumental contributions.

This music is honest, human and humane—a folky-lovely slow-rumble. It’s rock but of the hangover-friendly, stoner variety; it’s folk but at a groovy speed. As notable as the music, however, is front woman Kate Stables, whose voice hearkens back to the classic singersongwriter era–her distinctive, cutting vocals up front in the mix. It’s a self-confidence gained since her previous album, 2011’s Wriggle Out the Restless, which made her band a minor institution in the United Kingdom, especially on the radio which has embraced the group. This Is The Kit has received across the board support from BBC 6 DJs Lauren Laverne, Radcliffe & Maconie, Marc Riley, Cerys Matthews, and Mary Anne Hobbs– receiving further play from BBC Radio 1’s Huw Stephens, Jen & Ally, and Phil Taggart. “Wonderful wonderful stuff,” said DJ and Elbow frontman Guy Garvey, This Is The Kit an “have been an essential fixture of British folk music for the past 10 years…one of a handful of truly innovate songwriters working with the British folk template today.”

In America, however, the band is just building up to their breakout moment. Bruce Warren, program director at influential American AAA station WXPN has praised Stables’ “warm and gorgeous voice” and we expect similar notices to come across on this new LP. From Kate’s earliest year growing up in the UK town of Winchester, she learned that great art takes time. “In some ways the place I grew up is defined by being a Roman Saxon medieval cathedral city,” she explains. “They started building the Winchester Cathedral a thousand years ago and they’ve been working on it ever since.” It’s an exciting moment to join This Is The Kit’s continuing musical evolution into a synesthetic, shape-shifting entity—rooted in folk but encompassing elements of psychedelia, alternative rock, and electronic textures and sensibilities.

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“John James” is the lead single from The Isles forthcoming debut EP ‘Embers’. This is a project from the Wilsen Vocalist,
DOWNLOAD: theislesband.bandcamp.com/releases

~ The Isles ~
Tamsin Wilson – voice/acoustic guitar/dobro
Megan Lui – voice/electric guitar
Hannah Read – voice/fiddle/acoustic guitar

with:
Jake Sherman – organ/wurlitzer/piano
Jason Burger – percussion
Alex Jenkins – bass
Jas Walton – clarinet/bass clarinet
Dan Knobler – additional guitars/banjo

Produced by Dan Knobler
Recorded and mixed by Dan Knobler at Mason Jar Music in Brooklyn, NY

www.theislesband.com
www.theislesband.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/theislesband

Sarah Howells and Richard Llewellyn make up the brilliant British duo Paper Aeroplanes thier previous album Little Letters is followed by the good news is that Sarah and Richard are preparing to release their third full length album called “JOY” which, combining their folk stylings with more electronic and pop elements, brings a more optimistic tone after a series of albums full of self-confessed “break-up songs”. We have the pleasure of premiering their video for “Good Love Lives”

“I’d basically had enough of feeling a bit sad, frustrated and dissatisfied, says singer Sarah, and wanted to change all of that. During the process of trying to learn that elusive skill of being happy, these songs emerged.  This album is about the light that is revealed after a period of darkness. It’s about love that lasts and the blue that is always behind the clouds, the calm that is underneath the panic in your stomach.”

“This was the first time we’d worked closely with a producer and not arranged all of the music ourselves. Mason Neely (Cerys Matthews, Lambchop, Colorama, Sufjan Stevens) was deeply involved in the making of the album, almost like a third band member which was exciting because it provided a whole new bank of ideas and skills. We found ourselves trying quite different instrumentation and moving into new territories but we hope the essence of our sound endures.” The band are coming to the Nottingham contemporary in May 2015. (more…)

William Wild’s self-titled debut is a dynamic synthesis of 60’s folk and 1970’s rock ’n’ roll. The band’s distinct blend of acoustic instrumentation, lush strings, heavy percussion, and dynamic vocal melodies evokes a nostalgic yet modern approach to folk rock. Live performance of “Townsend” from self-titled album. Every so often we find ourselves with a submission that blows us out of the water and throws all our skepticism out the window. With “Townsend,” the lead single from William Wild‘s self-titled debut album, it’s not immediately apparent that you’re listening to something out of the ordinary. But when leader singer Garrett Sale belts out those first few notes, its there and then that realization sets it. While Sale’s timbre is much less “husky” than his counterparts, he possesses something far greater: a deep sense of emotion. On “Townsend,” Sale’s arresting voice is accompanied by a dynamic and effortless folk backdrop that sees the band intertwining violin, cello, piano, drums and guitar. At the four-minute mark, the instruments converge and the song begins to take shape, leaving us with a rather epic conclusion.