Posts Tagged ‘Emily Massey’

The ’90s are remembered for bringing us grunge and alternative music. The era, though, also gave us another great guitar-driven sound and that was sadcore. It was the perfect medium between the heaviness popularized by mostly Seattle-based bands and the dreamy, shoegaze that infiltrated the London music scene. The songs of Red House Painters, Galaxie 500, Mojave 3, and so on were not simply dazzling and intoxicating, but they told powerful stories and uplifting messages. Nearly thirty years later, sadcore is making a comeback thanks to bands like Slow Pulp.

For the past year, the Madison, Wisconsin-bred, Chicago-based quartet of Emily Massey (vocals/guitar), Alexander Leeds (bass), Theodore Mathews (drums), and Henry Stoehr (guitar) have made us contemplate our existence while enrapturing us. On “Falling Apart”, which was released earlier this year, they captured feelings of confusion, anger, and fear due to the chaos in this world. But just as they were about to join us in thinking all has ended, they peel back the curtains and let the light in on “At It Again”.

Like the aforementioned ’90s, sadcore bands, Slow Pulp deliver an unforgettable, dazzling number. While the guitars churn with grit and the rhythms pulse with urgency, Massey’s dreamy, embracing vocals take the track to the heavens. She tells us to keep our heads up and do our apart to be better people. To help make things around us better again. This band, too, gets better with every new release, which makes their debut album, Moveys, a must listen. It will be available in stores on October 9th via Winspear Records

Chicago band Slow Pulp’s debut album Moveys is out now and feels custom-built for the autumnal period. Emily Massey speaks direct to her mom on the the Alex G-esque “Track,” assuring her of a lifetime of love in her own lowkey but heartfelt way.

Shoegaze newbies Slow Pulp from Madison, Wisconsin The band are Emily Massey (vocals/guitar), Alexander Leeds (bass), Theodore Mathews (drums), and Henry Stoehr (guitar) – are gearing up to release their self-produced debut album, and have so far shared three standout singles in “At It Again”, “Idaho”, and last month’s “Falling Apart” .

This week they are sharing one more single from the upcoming record prior to its release, the soft and shimmering “Montana”.

Emily Massey says of the track:

“This song is about moving beyond defining myself in terms of my mental health. I’ve been working through this over the last couple of years and this song is a reflection of this process and where I am now. “Montana” was the first song we finished recording for the album.
Henry’s early demo was kind of heavy and distorted, and when we went to play it together for the first time, it came out a lot slower and cleaner. Our friend Willie Christianson wrote and recorded the slide guitar and harmonica parts.”

A testament to hard-fought personal growth, “Moveys” is a remarkable debut album made in remarkable times, as Slow Pulp powered through health challenges, personal upheaval, and a pandemic. The songs on Moveys took shape while on tour with Alex G in 2019, after the band scrapped an album’s-worth of material following Massey’s diagnosis with Lyme disease and chronic Mono. The obstacles only continued from there, as Massey’s parents were soon after in a severe car crash…one week before COVID-19 shut the country down. Full of blistering energy and emotional catharsis, this compelling 10-track collection highlights the band’s resourcefulness and resilience to come together during unthinkable time.

“Montana” is taken from ‘Moveys’ – out October 09th on Winspear Recordings: Slide guitar and harmonica by Willie Christianson

Chicago-via-Madison indie rock four-piece Slow Pulp wrote an album’s worth of material last year, while touring across North America with Alex G. But when the band’s lead singer, Emily Massey, was diagnosed with Lyme disease and chronic mono, they scrapped the record entirely and started fresh on a set of songs that better reflected her life as she suddenly knew it. As COVID-19 started to shift the world off of its axis and the writing sessions for what would become Moveys — their self-produced debut, due out October 9th via Winspear — wound down, Massey’s parents were involved in a serious car accident. So, once again, Massey set about grappling with her new reality in a hurry.

“At It Again” is the ripping two-minute climax of Slow Pulp’s forthcoming album. With grungy, distorted guitars and blistering drum fills, the track whips and turns with the intensity of a rollercoaster. Moveys is out October 09.

The result of that those final catastrophes is “Falling Apart,” premiering at the foot of the page along with a video directed by Jake Lazovick. It’s a muted and slow-moving song, underscored by frequent Alex G collaborator Molly Germer’s violin, but articulates what’s now a familiar feeling for most people — that unexpected but inevitable rush of emotion that comes after weeks of pretending things are going to work out just fine.

“Life felt completely surreal, [and] everything had drastically changed and at such a rapid pace,” Massey says of the time the song was written. “It was especially strange because everyone was experiencing the same thing at the same time, but couldn’t be physically with each other to support each other. I felt like I couldn’t process any emotions I had about the whole ordeal because I had to keep it together to take care of my family. It became easier to stay numb, and create a facade that I was doing ok, than it was to release any type of healthy emotion for a long time. Luckily I did allow myself to have a full on breakdown induced by a stubbed toe and confusion over taxes, sometimes it’s the littlest things that finally get you.”

“At It Again” is taken from ‘Moveys’ – out Oct 09 on Winspear:

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Chicago’s Slow Pulp make an excellent early name for themselves this afternoon with their latest single ‘Falling Apart’. Now in their third year, the outfit are gearing up for the release of their debut album Moveys”.

Fresh and cooling to the brain and body during one of the hottest weeks of the year, ‘Falling Apart’ abounds with soft touch guitars and the vaguest hint of violin.
It’s all pulled together by the relaxing vocal of Emily Massey: The wellworn calm that emanates from the tune is remarkable considering that in the past two years, Massey has struggled with Lyme’s disease and chronic Mono, then dealt with her parents being in a severe car crash – all in the global landscape of a pandemic.

“It became easier to stay numb, and create a facade that I was doing ok, than it was to release any type of healthy emotion for a long time. Luckily I did allow myself to have a full on breakdown induced by a stubbed toe and confusion over taxes, sometimes it’s the littlest things that finally get you” she said.

“Why don’t you go back to falling apart? You were so good at that,” Emily Massey of the Chicago-based band Slow Pulp sings. (The group will release its debut album, “Moveys,” on October. 9th.) The atmosphere around her — lush acoustic guitar, lightly brushed percussion and the lulling violin of frequent Alex G collaborator Molly Gemer

“Falling Apart” is taken from ‘Moveys’ – out Oct 09 on Winspear:

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Slow Pulp’s remarkable full-length debut “Moveys” is a testament to hard-fought personal growth. In the process of making their new record, the Chicago-based indie rock band powered through health challenges, personal upheaval, and a pandemic, all while learning how to be better songwriters and friends. Full of blistering energy and emotional catharsis, this compelling 10-track collection highlights the band’s resourcefulness and resilience to come together even when they were states away.

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Slow Pulp is Alexander Leeds, Emily Massey, Theodore Mathews, Henry Stoehr

All songs written and performed by Slow Pulp

From the album Moveys, releases October 9, 2020

Chicago-via-Wisconsin four-piece Slow Pulp recorded most of their “Big Day” EP in a cabin in Michigan. Music critics love to obsess over environment—where an album was recorded, how it was recorded and how the process was potentially affected by a space—and occasionally their assumptions about the music’s relationship to the landscape actually reflect reality. This, however, is one of those instances when a record sounds absolutely nothing like its origin grounds.

This four-song suckerpunch contains moments of ambience and noise, but never does Big Day resemble something Bon Iver made in the woods. It’s impressive because Slow Pulp— made up of Teddy Mathews, Alex Leeds, Henry Stoehr and Emily Massey, who joined later but who the band would absolutely be incomplete without don’t even have a full-length album out yet.

They barely have enough songs out in the world to equal an album tracklist, but they’re nonetheless one of the most exciting acts to emerge this year. “New Media,” a steady, shiny standout on the EP, is a classic taste of millennial jadedness. “I can’t seem to break the fence,” Massey sings. “Overacted in all my plans.” But when has exhaustion ever sounded this composed?

‘Big Day’ full EP by Slow Pulp is out now:

Tracklist : 1. Do You Feel It (00:00) 2. New Media (01:47) 3. High (04:58) 4. Young World (07:31)

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The hypnotically snaky guitar line in Slow Pulp’s “At Home” recalls the spare majesty of bands like Bedhead, but lead singer Emily Massey elevates it by lending the song a certain melancholy swirl. She’s the newest member of Slow Pulp, having once been brought in to sing backup and play rhythm guitar. But given that the other three players have been collaborating since elementary school, it’s no surprise that the group performs its dreamy, subtly forceful rock songs with great clarity and chemistry.

Chicago is an inspiring place, and there’s a lot of really good shows happening all the time, it’s invigorating…” Henry says. They bring an electric but dreamy energy to the scene that is quickly at home. Joining the ranks of Lala Lala, OHMME, Grapetooth, and many others, Slow Pulp brings to the table their exploration of dreamy psychedelic punk. And they seem to be taking to it well too—they played their first headlining show in Chicago on January 4th and are in the studio working on a new EP.