TOM PETTY – ” She’s The One ” Released August 6th 1996

Posted: August 8, 2018 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
Tags: , , ,

She's the One

When asked for a song to include in writer-director Edward Burns‘ romantic comedy She’s The One,  Tom Petty responded with an entire album. Though nominally a film soundtrack, the Warner Bros. collection stands proudly with the singer-songwriter’s best work of the 1990s. Cut with producer Rick Rubin and the ever-reliable Heartbreakers, Songs and music from “SHE’S THE ONE” has a relaxed feel and eclectic mix of material (including Beck and Lucinda Williams covers) that give the impression Petty was really enjoying himself. Which doesn’t mean his customary craftsmanship is absent; the dozen originals include such terrific songs as “Climb That Hill” and single “Walls (Circus),” which features guest vocals from Lindsey Buckingham. Released in 1996, SHE’S THE ONE is an album sometimes forgotten but well worth rediscovering.

The album was not mentioned on the four-hour documentary Runnin’ Down a Dream, though Petty could be seen doing a studio session of the song “Angel Dream (No. 4)”.

Some songs were originally recorded for Wildflowers and were put on this album to fill it out. When In April 2015, when Tom Petty’s back catalog was released in High-resolution audio, this was one of only two albums not included in the series (the other being Wildflowers).

There are two songs on the disc that Petty chose to record and release in two different versions. The first is Walls which kicks off the album with its Beatles- and Byrds-inspired psychedelic version, aptly titled Walls (Circus). The version appearing later in the disc is more barren and Dylan-esque in nature. The second song to appear twice is Angel Dream. Both versions borrow a page from the Simon and Garfunkel book. The first to appear is more like the Bridge over Troubled Water era, while the later version borrows from the Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. era. One of my favorites on this disc is Hung Up and Overdue which borrows heavily from The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds album.

Most notable on this disc is Petty’s merging into a pattern similar to Neil Young’s. His Heartbreakers are like Young’s Crazy Horse, and his sound blends from solitary acoustic music to all-out feedback-laden rockers. It certainly keeps things fresh with the stark contrast between the styles and seems to fit Petty as well as it fits Young.

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