Posts Tagged ‘The Jam’

 

All the details on the 6CD “Fire and Skill” Jam box, which features six previously unreleased concert recordings

Named after the legendary sign painted on Paul Weller’s amp, Fire And Skill is a superb six disc boxed set – featuring six previously unreleased concerts, one from each year of The Jam’s major-label career.

Starting with an incendiary early gig at London’s famous 100 Club from 1977, A Music Machine show from 1978, featuring most of the 2nd album – ‘This Is The Modern World’, Reading University show in 1979 – playing material from their breakthrough album ‘All Mod Cons’, Newcastle City Hall in 1980 – previewing songs from forthcoming album ‘Sound Affects’, London’s legendary Hammersmith Palais show in 1981 – part of The Jam’s four consecutive nights, previewing material from the forthcoming final album ‘The Gift’ and one of the band’s final ever gigs at Wembley Arena in 1982.

Packaged in mini, lift-off lid box this set includes a separate hard-back book and individual gatefold wallets for the discs, as well as new essay, period photos and rare memorabilia. All audio has been remastered at Abbey Road.

‘Fire & Skill: The Jam Live’, a 6 CD deluxe box set, will be released on Universal/Polydor on 30th October 2015.

It’s 40 years since classic The Jam line-up first started touring. The band had a phenomenal impact on pop music and wider youth culture. In their short career, they influenced a generation with their music, style, politics and inspiration.With Somerset House’s current exhibition and Universal Music’s recent CD ‘About The Young Idea’ which both trace the band’s story in hits and images – Universal/Polydor now announce a live box set that follows the journey through incendiary concert recordings.

1.) Starting with an early gig at London’s famous 100 Club from 1977, the show featured took place 10 months after they first played the venue in November 1976, and was recorded for broadcast on American radio ahead of the trio’s inaugural visit to US in October 1977 for a six-date tour.

2.) A Music Machine show from 1978, featuring most of the 2nd album – ‘This Is The Modern World’. This was The Jam’s sixth live show of the year and one of four low-key shows in the capital to fanfare their new ‘News Of The World’ single under the banner ‘The London Blitz’.

3.) Reading University – Feb 1979. Playing material from their breakthrough album ‘All Mod Cons’, this was The Jam’s first live appearance of 1979, and found the band in a radically different place to their showcase at the Music Machine 12 months before. In that time, their third album, ‘All Mod Cons’, had been released to critical acclaim, and their status as one of the New Wave’s most musically substantial and exciting bands had been secured. And Paul Weller was still only 20 years old…

4.) Newcastle City Hall – October 1980, previewing songs from forthcoming album ‘Sound Affects’. In the time between the show at Reading University (on Disc 3) and this appearance at Newcastle City Hall 20 months later, there had been more extraordinary developments in the group’s world. ‘Setting Sons’, their fourth album, had given them a Top 3 hit with ‘The Eton Rifles’, which was followed in February 1980 with the stirring Number 1 single, ‘Going Underground’. After three years on Polydor, The Jam had finally become the biggest group in the UK.

5.) London’s legendary Hammersmith Palais – December 1981. Part of The Jam’s four consecutive nights, previewing material from the forthcoming final album ‘The Gift’. The shows took in the form of a ‘60s soul revue, showcasing new acts including Bananarama, Department S and TV21.

6.) One of the band’s final ever gigs at Wembley Arena – December 1982. Late in 1982 The Jam announced they were splitting up – there would, though, be a final chance for fans to experience The Jam’s astonishing live shows, with a 14-date ‘farewell’ tour announced. The centrepiece was a five-night stand at Wembley Arena, the 10,000-capacity shed next to the London football stadium (the recording here is from the second date), the biggest live venue in the capital.

* Packaged in mini, lift-off lid box with 72-page, colour hard-back book.* Individual gatefold wallets for the discs, designed as facsimiles of the original tape boxes.

* Includes new essay, period photos, rare memorabilia and set of five postcard prints.* Remastered at Abbey Road.* Featuring stunning live versions of all the band’s classic hits and favourites of which only 11 tracks previously released.

 

Tab_width

Catch a glimpse of the ‘Growing Up With…The Jam’ deluxe edition book, and place your order, at the link below.

The beautifully presented hardback, packed with celebrity memories paying tribute to the band, coincides with a new Somerset House exhibition ‘The Jam: About The Young Idea’, opening on 26th June.

*Limited edition deluxe format exclusively here. The deluxe edition will come bound in a presentation gift box with draw string cotton bag and limited edition print. *

‘Growing Up…. With The Jam’ is a beautifully presented book in a coffee table packed from cover to cover with celebrity memories paying tribute to the band that inspired an entire generation…. The Jam.Tab_width

‘Growing Up…. With The Jam’ is a beautifully presented book in a coffee table packed from cover to cover with celebrity memories paying tribute to the band that inspired an entire generation…. The Jam. Written by the official exhibition producers Nicky Weller, Gary Crowley, Russell Reader and Den Davis and Published by Nicetime inc.

A host of household names from the world of music, film and media have penned fitting tributes to the band. From stars of the sixties who influenced the band, Ray Davies and Pete Townshend to the bands competing for chart success, Adam Ant, Sir Bob Geldof, Mick Jones and Jools Holland. The stars The Jam inspired, Noel Gallagher, Kelly Jones and Sharleen Spiteri, to actors and media personalities including Martin Freeman, Max Beesley and many many more.

With foreword from all three members of the band, heart-warming personal recollections, spine tingling accolades and unseen photos, this really is a must read for any music fan.

Paul Weller has unveiled the title track and new single from his forthcoming album, Saturn’s Pattern. The catchy, piano-led first track shares the title of the album and will appear on the Jam turned solo icon’s twelfth solo studio album. Weller said of the title’s meaning and artwork: “Apparently it’s some kind of wind on the north side of Saturn which created a hexagonal shape”.

The track will be released on 10th May as a 2-track download, followed on May 11th by a 7” vinyl.  There will also be an exclusive 7” vinyl ‘bundle’ available from Paul Weller’s official website which includes downloads of the track, an art print and a bonus print of Paul’s hand written lyrics to ‘Saturns Pattern’. One fan will also receive the original hand-written (and signed) lyric sheet.

Paul Weller teamed up with Johnny Marr last night for a cover of Junior Walker & The Allstars’ 1966 hit  ‘(I’m A) Roadrunner’. Paul Weller was at the Royal Albert Hall last night as part of the Teenage Cancer Trust concerts.

Weller announced the former Smiths member to the stage after a series of songs and said: “Would you please welcome back to the stage Johnny Marr. This will be either be fucking great or a disaster.”

Paul Weller also delivered a host of new songs from his forthcoming album including the album title track ‘Saturn’s Pattern’, ‘Long Time’, I’m Where I Should Be’ and ‘These City Streets’.  

He went on to play a two hour set with his five-piece band, performing a variety of songs from his back catalogue.

allmodconsthejam

All Mod Cons, released to wide acclaim in 1978, firmly cemented the group’s rise to extraordinary heights. Indeed, for many it was the first essential Jam album and listening to it now its impact has not diminished over time.”
When I think about English records I think of The Kinks’ The Village Green Preservation Society, The Smiths’ The Queen is Dead, The Who’s Quadrophenia and The Jam’s All Mod Cons. To me all those albums are definately English. It’s their third full-length LP. It took it’s title from a British idiom one might find in housing advertisements, is short for “all modern conveniences” and is a pun on the band’s association with the mod revival as well. Of Course it is also Paul Weller’s view on the music business as a ‘con’.The single “Down in the Tube Station at Midnight” was one of the band’s most successful chart hits up to that point, peaking at No15 in the UK charts. In 2000, Q magazine placed All Mod Cons at number 50 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. it is their best album.
British Invasion pop influences run through the album, most obviously in the cover of The Kinks’ David Watts and It’s too bad a song The Who would have been proud of.
To Be Someone (Didn’t we have a nice) time is an early jab at the rock’n roll lifestyle, about the hollow and empty life of a star, supposedly written after a horrible tour pairing in America with Blue Oyster Cult. The Bass line is a cool rip-of of Paul McCartneys bass line to “Taxman”.

I’ve highlighted my favourite tracks, but all the tracks are really strong, great playing and great singing all around. The Production is unusually complex and sophisticated for a punk/new wave album. The song “Down in the Tube Station at Midnight” is a first-person narrative of a young man who walks into a tube station on the way home to his wife, and is beaten by far right thugs. The lyrics of the song “All Mod Cons” criticise fickle people who attach themselves to people who enjoy success and leave them once that is over. The Jam regrouped and refocused for All Mod Cons, an album that marked a great leap in songwriting maturity and sense of purpose. For the first time, Paul Weller built, rather than fell back, upon his influences, carving a distinct voice all his own; he employed a story-style narrative with invented characters and vivid British imagery à la Ray Davies to make incisive social commentary — all in a musically irresistible package. The youthful perspective and impassioned delivery on All Mod Cons first earned Weller the “voice of a generation” tag, and it certainly captures a moment in time, but really, the feelings and sentiments expressed on the album just as easily speak to any future generation of young people. Terms like “classic” are often bandied about, but in the case of All Mod Cons, it is certainly deserved.
Released 3 November 1978, recorded during July through to mid August 1978, at RAK Studios (Upper London) and Eden Studios listed as Punk rock, or Mod Revival,but also Power pop with a running time of just over 37 minutes, produced by Vic Coppersmith-Heaven and Chris Parry and released on the Polydor label 3rd November 1978