Posts Tagged ‘The Dark Side Of The Moon’

The Concert documentary Roger Waters: Us + Them, shot in Amsterdam on the European leg of Roger’s 2017/2018 world tour, will be in movie theaters worldwide on October 2nd & 6th only. We’ve got an exclusive clip from the film, featuring Roger performing early Pink Floyd song “One of These Days,” that gives you a feel for the scope of the stage production, not to mention the chops of his band (which includes drummer Joey Waronker, Lucius’ Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, and guitarist Jonathan Wilson). Watch that, and check out the trailer for Us + Them and a few other clips from the film,

Roger Waters, co-founder, creative force and songwriter behind Pink Floyd, presents his highly anticipated film, “Us + Them”, featuring state-of- the-art visual production and breath-taking sound in this unmissable cinema event. Filmed in Amsterdam on the European leg of his 2017 – 2018 Us + Them tour which saw Waters perform to over two million people worldwide, the film features songs from his legendary Pink Floyd albums (The Dark Side of the Moon, The Wall, Animals, Wish You Were Here) and from his last album, Is This The Life We Really Want? Waters collaborates once more with Sean Evans, visionary director of the highly acclaimed movie, Roger Waters The Wall, to deliver this creatively pioneering film that inspires with its powerful music and message of human rights, liberty and love.

Roger Waters’ spectacular Us + Them. The show features songs from Pink Floyd’s greatest albums (The Dark Side of The Moon, The Wall, Animals, Wish You Were Here) alongside new material. Roger Waters’ legendary live performances are renowned as immersive sensory experiences featuring high class, state-of- the-art audio visual production and breathtaking quad sound.

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Pink Floyd ‘Pulse’ 180g 4LP vinyl box set reissue with 52-page hardback book, all encased in a thick card slipcase.

Pink Floyd will re-release their 1995 UK Number 1 live album ‘PULSE’, pressed on heavyweight 180-gram vinyl.

‘PULSE’ was compiled by James Guthrie, Originally released in 1995, Pulse was recorded as Floyd toured across the UK and Europe in support of their 14th studio album The Division Bell in 1994.using various performances from the band’s 1994 Division Bell tour across the UK and Europe featuring David Gilmour, Nick Mason and Richard Wright. The album includes ‘The Dark Side of the Moon’ performed in full, as well as a whole side dedicated to the show’s encore.

The 4-LP set includes four different inner sleeves, each inside individual outer sleeves, plus a 52-page hardback photo book, all encased in a thick card slipcase. It will also feature One Of These Days, which was only included on the LP and cassette version of Pulse upon its original release.

This 2018 release was remastered from the original tapes by James Guthrie, Joel Plante and Bernie Grundman. Aubrey Powell of Hipgnosis and Peter Curzon, who worked on the original art with the late Hipgnosis co-founder, Storm Thorgerson, recreated the art package.

This 4LP set is released on Friday 18th May

Pink Floyd / Dark Side of the Moon / Immersions Box Set

Pink Floyd’s 1973 album “The Dark Side Of The Moon” is arguably the most recognizable album in rock and roll history. Spending a record-breaking 741 weeks on the US top albums Billboard charts, the release cemented Pink Floyd’s reputation as the premiere art rock band of a generation.

During the Dark Side of the Moon sessions, the band literally ran out of tracks on the 2″ 16-track machine they were working with. The drums had to be copied across and mixed down to a 24-track machine, so all issues of Dark Side of the Moon have had second generation drums until James Guthrie’s 2003 remaster where he laboriously tracked down the original 16-track tapes and sourced the drums from the original tapes.
• When recording the Dark Side of the Moon live concerts, their were various technical problems, including the kick-drum being mic’d up incorrectly, meaning that non of that drum was recorded on tape. However spill from other mics picked it up slightly, and engineers were able to accurately recreate the kick-drum for the remastered live recordings.
• During the research period for the reissues, the original tapes of the famous Dark Side of the Moon “interviews” were found including – amongst many others – Paul and Linda McCartney’s voices and Wings’ Guitarist Henry McCullough, whose “I don’t know; I was really drunk at the time” can be heard at the end of Money. Since the engineers now had access to the original isolated tapes we can apparently look forward to a DVD ‘Easter egg’ which will make use of some of this audio!
• The original working title for Dark Side of the Moon was Eclipse and The Great Gig in the Sky had the working title of  “the religious section”, while On The Run was known as “the travel section”. These fitted in with the ‘big’ themes of the album money, time etc.

While the album was released on March 1st, 1973, the music was remarkably written months before the album ever premiered. The band promoted DSOTM with two tours, one before the album release in 1972 and the other, after the release, in 1973. After technical difficulties halted Floyd’s first performance on January 20th, 1972, the group took the stage one night later and delivered the first-ever, full-length performance of “The Dark Side Of The Moon”.

Remarkably, the live set matches the album closely. With a handful of differences, including a spacey jam instead of “On The Run” and some church-like organ progressions instead of “The Great Gig In The Sky,” it’s interesting to see how this music evolved from a live performance in Portsmouth, UK to one of the most well-known albums of all time, just a little over a year later.

Also remarkable is that a full recording of the show exists! . Feast your ears on the first-ever live take on “The Dark Side Of The Moon”Pink Floyd – Portsmouth (Live Portsmouth, UK – January 21st, 1972)

Pink Floyd released their historic LP “Dark Side Of The Moon” on March 10th, 1973. It would go on to become the 3rd biggest album ever with over 45 millions sold to date.

In 2013, The Dark Side of the Moon was selected for preservation in the United States National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

It set new standards for recorded music. Happy 43rd Birthday to . It was the Pink Floyd’s eighth studio album The Dark Side of The Moon It remained in the US charts for 741 discontinuous weeks from 1973 to 1988, longer than any other album in history. With an estimated 45 million copies sold, it is Pink Floyd’s most commercially successful album and one of the best-selling albums worldwide.

No-one in March 1973 could have imagined that an album released in that month would still be thrilling listeners 43 years later, but it’s true.

Pink Floyd, in conjunction with EMI, have undertaken an overhaul of their catalogue, and for the first time, allowed us to see part of their creative process, by compiling a 6-disc box set of ‘Dark Side’ including various multi-channel mixes, much memorabilia and restored screen films from their live show, but, most importantly, a newly-mixed live concert from 1974 and a disc of alternative versions and outtakes.

Generally regarded as Pink Floyd’s masterwork, the qualities of The Dark Side Of The Moon have perhaps been taken for granted in recent years, but a return to it with fresh ears reminds the listener of its strengths. Part of its enduring appeal is the quality of the material, there simply isn’t a bad track on it, with a listening experience greater even than the sum of the parts.

As to its subject matter, Roger Waters said in 2003 that it was “An expression of political, philosophical, humanitarian empathy that was desperate to get out.” He said it was about “all the pressures and difficulties and questions that crop up in one’s life and create anxiety, and the potential you have to solve them or choose the path that you?re going to walk.”

The band initially convened in December 1971 and January 1972 at Decca’s West Hampstead Studios in Broadhurst Gardens, London and then at a warehouse owned by The Rolling Stones at 47 Bermondsey Street, South London. One of the musical elements, to become “Us And Them”, already existed, having begun life as a rejected musical sequence by Richard Wright for Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point. Another, to become Brain Damage, was a piece of Roger Waters‘, created in the writing sessions of the Meddle album in January of that year.

In the pre-Internet age, it wasn’t too commercially suicidal to preview new material before its release, so Floyd were able to knock the album into shape over several months of road work. The first full-length performance was at the Guildhall in Portsmouth, England, on January 21st, 1972, after which almost the entire year was spent with the band performing Dark Side live, interspersed with visits to Abbey Road studios from May onwards to work on individual songs.

With Alan Parsons engineering, the first version of the Dark Side album was mixed in December 1972. On the box set, check out the first mix on CD 6 of The Dark Side Of The Moon, which is quite revealing about the gestation of the final version. Speak To Me as a track was a late addition, the album originally starting only with a backwards piano chord leading straight into Breathe (In The Air). The most obvious change is to The Great Gig In The Sky, which, before the addition of Clare Torry’s vocal performance in January 1973, was comprised mainly of Richard Wright’s organ accompanied by, in concert, taped religious incantations and in the first mix, voices of the Apollo 17 space mission. At the time, it was known as The Mortality Sequence or The Religious Sequence. It shows that all the band’s subsequent decisions on the album were creatively correct, including even the completely redone Travel Sequence, which was replaced by On The Run.

As much of a revelation as the newly-released material and the works in progress is the 1974 live album, compiled from performances at London’s Wembley Empire Pool in November 1974. As opposed to the then-live radio broadcast, mixed by the BBC in real time with an unflattering balance, this sourced the original multitrack tapes and, as mixed by Floyd engineers Andy Jackson and Damon Iddins, shows Floyd at the top of their game, rhythmic, swinging, emotive and punchy. If you can’t afford the box, it’s available as a 2-CD Experience edition alongside the remastered original album.

Perhaps you don’t need a reminder that the album is one of the biggest-selling albums of all time, but it’s not too late to rediscover it. I think you’ll agree that it’s also one of the best.