Posts Tagged ‘Deerhunter’

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As thrilling and unpredictable as anything in Deerhunter’s near 15-year career, Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared? was recorded in several strategic geographic points across North America, and produced by the band, Cate LeBon, Ben H. Allen III, and Ben Etter. Forgetting the questions and making up unrelated answers, Deerhunter’s eighth LP is a science fiction album about the present. Exhausted with the toxic concept of nostalgia, they reinvent their approach to microphones, the drum kit, the harpsichord, the electromechanical and synthetic sounds of keyboards. Whatever guitars are left are pure chrome, plugged straight into the mixing desk with no amplifier or vintage warmth.

How do you describe an album out of time, concerned with the disappearance of culture, of humanity, of nature, of logic and emotion? Why make this album in an era when attention spans have been reduced to next to nothing, and the tactile grains of making music have been further reduced to algorithms and projected playlist placement. Why wake up in the morning? Why hasn’t everything already disappeared? Deerhunter’s eighth LP forgets the questions and makes up unrelated answers. It gets up, walks around, it records itself in several strategic geographic points across north america. It comes home, restructures itself and goes back to bed to avoid the bad news. From the opening harpsichord and piano figures of Death in Midsummer, it is impossible to tell where the record came from. Is No One’s Sleeping an outtake of an aborted Kinks recording session in 1977 Berlin with Eno producing? No. That is nostalgia. If there is one thing Deerhunter are making clear it is that they have exhausted themselves with that toxic concept. What they spend their time doing instead is reinventing their approach to microphones, the drum kit, the harpsichord, the electro-mechanical and synthetic sounds of keyboards. Whatever guitars are left are pure chrome, plugged straight into the mixing desk with no amplifier or vintage warmth. The result is as thrilling, haunting, and unpredictable as anything in their roughly 15 year career. Deerhunter have made a science fiction album about the present. Is it needed right now? Is it relevant? Perhaps only to a small audience. DADA was a reaction to the horrors of war. Punk was a reaction to the slow and vacant 70’s. Hip Hop was a liberated musical culture that challenged the notions presented wholesale about the African-American experience. What is popular music today a reaction to?

Deerhunter whead album packshot

Deerhunter - Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?

How do you describe an album out of time, concerned with the disappearance of culture, of humanity, of nature, of logic and emotion? Why make this album in an era when attention spans have been reduced to next to nothing, and the tactile grains of making music have been further reduced to algorithms and projected playlist placement. Why wake up in the morning? Why hasn’t everything already disappeared? 

Deerhunter’s eighth LP forgets the questions and makes up unrelated answers. It gets up, walks around, it records itself in several strategic geographic points across North America. It comes home, restructures itself and goes back to bed to avoid the bad news.

From the opening harpsichord and piano figures of ‘Death in Midsummer’, it is impossible to tell where the record came from. Is ‘No One’s Sleeping’ an outtake of an aborted Kinks recording session in 1977 Berlin with Eno producing? No. That is nostalgia. If there is one thing Deerhunter are making clear it is that they have exhausted themselves with that toxic concept.

What they spend their time doing instead is reinventing their approach to microphones, the drum kit, the harpsichord, the electromechanical and synthetic sounds of keyboards. Whatever guitars are left are pure chrome, plugged straight into the mixing desk with no amplifier or vintage warmth.

The result is as thrilling, haunting, and unpredictable as anything in their roughly 15-year career.

Deerhunter have made a science fiction album about the present. Is it needed right now? Is it relevant? Perhaps only to a small audience. DADA was a reaction to the horrors of war. Punk was a reaction to the slow and vacant 70’s. Hip Hop was a liberated musical culture that challenged the notions presented wholesale about the African-American experience. What is popular music today a reaction to?

Deerhunter are:Bradford Cox, Lockett Pundt, Moses Archuleta, Josh McKay, and Javier Morales

From the new album ‘Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared’ out January 18th, 2019 on 4AD Records.

Deerhunter - New Album 'Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?', Single Out Now

Bradford Cox and company are no strangers they’re one of those phenomenal live acts who stand to make year-end roundups like these whenever they set out on tour and should be seen as a must see act. Their 2015 dates behind this year’s  excellent release “Fading Frontier” were no exception. Cox still can command a crowd – Deerhunter performs live at The Regent Theater, downtown Los Angeles, California.

Deerhunter have returned this autumn with the news their brand new album “Fading Frontier”, the follow-up to 2013’s Monomania was released via 4AD Records in October.

Alongside the album news, the Atlanta-born four-piece have announced full tour dates with new single ‘Snakeskin’ that comes accompanied by a typically trippy video.

The album was produced by the band and Ben H. Allen III, and features members of Broadcast and Stereolab, according to a press release. Bradford Cox and company are no strangers to this list—they’re one of those phenomenal live acts who stand to make year-end roundups like these whenever they set out on tour. Their 2015 dates behind this year’s Fading Frontier were no exception. Cox still can command a crowd, even occasionally breaking up fights.

The Atlanta art-rock provocateurs have done what so many of their peers from the Early Aughts Indie Explosion have failed to do: age gracefully. They aren’t making soft rock per say, but they are making some sublimely smooth indie rock that encapsulates the best lessons learned from their earlier, more aggressively arty works. Tracks like “Duplex Planet” inspired by the legendary fanzine of the same name and “Living My Life” make getting old just as mysterious and exciting as being young, while the glam-rock shuffle of “Snakeskin” is the grown-and-sexy song of the year. Bradford Cox and company have found a way to tease pop concepts out fine art, have rebuilt their songcraft out of the shattered pieces of 21st century rock ‘n’ roll to create and art-rock record that is as challenging as it is mature.

Last year, Bradford Cox got hit by a car, and he came out of the resulting depression with his gentlest, most comfortable collection of songs yet. “Fading Frontier” isn’t a happy album, exactly — there’s still anxiety and uncertainty and a nagging preoccupation with the looming specter of mortality. But those are all essential parts of human existence, and it seems that Cox has made peace with them. That maturity could translate to a lack of urgency, and Fading Frontier doesn’t feel like a statement on the level of something like Monomania. But when you’ve got songs this good, who cares

Deerhunter, imbued with a melange of R.E.M., Big Star and, dare we say, a touch of Roger McGuinn and Gene Clark harmony, have embraced the melodic on their lamentable opus to the Fading Frontier. Suffused in a crystalline and hazy production that recalls both the Animal Collective and Beach House, the band, mostly carrying around Bradford Cox’s baggage, have never sounded clearer and brighter. Slithering to esoteric swamp boogie, college rock and dreamy Numan-esque synth, Deerhunter navigate through the depressive thoughts and resignation of their de facto band leader; his near-fatal car accident, delusions and Marfan syndrome illness plaintively and sometimes philosophically pouring from every lyric.

Deerhunter have just shared the video for new single “Breaker” from the forthcoming album Fading Frontier. Like the song itself, which has Bradford Cox and Lockett Pundt sharing vocals for the first time, the video was a collaborative effort, directed by Cox with additional photography by Pundt. They’re both in front of the camera too, as are members Moses Archuleta and Josh McKay. Check it out, along with the “Snakeskin” video, below.
The band’s tour starts in about a month, one day after Fading Frontier is out, hitting the West Coast first and then heading to Europe and the UK before they get to NYC for those two NYC shows in December: the Brooklyn Vegan-presented show at Irving Plaza on 12/08 and then Warsaw on 12/09. Cox will open those shows with Atlas Sound sets and tickets are still available.
Glorious sound, bigger, clearer, more uplifting, brighter, yet still somewhat morose, aka still Deerhunter. So proud of my boys, this release is gonna be their biggest to date, and they deserve all the accolades they receive. A band of musicians grow with time and if they are artists, so does the music. It’s a mature sound. Big credit goes to producer Ben Allen for instinctively knowing what Bradford and Co. were trying to achieve, and then taking them there. And the duet I’m sure will not be the last. Perfect blend of harmonies and layering guitar effects. Deerhunter

‘Breaker’, from the album ‘Fading Frontier’, released October 16th, 2015 on 4AD Records

Even at their prettiest, Deerhunter can’t help but fuck with you. On the second verse of Fading Frontier’s glimmering drift “Breaker,” Bradford Cox paints a seemingly romantic portrait of all-night drives and the way they can make you forget your own mortality for a moment. But no, even the stars above are slowly dying. (“Uh oh.”) Lockett Pundt chimes in, “I can’t seem to stem the tide no more,” and yeah, at a certain point we all have to give in to time’s unrelenting current. But if you’re lucky, the flipside of aging is maturity, something Deerhunter demonstrate beautifully here — relatively speaking.