Posts Tagged ‘City Music’

Kevin Morby

Kevin Morby has carved out a niche over the course of four solo albums as a generous songwriter and lyricist, a chronicler of details from city and rural life. Morby’s latest album, “City Music”, finds him reflecting on city landscapes and experiences, as well as old friends which take the form of ghosts. “Come to Me Now,” is emblematic of Morby’s gift of imbuing songs with an air of religiosity, using space and gaps to conjure images of spectral lovers and rotted city structures.

City Music was Morby’s first album recorded with his talented live band, which consists of amazing Meg Duffy (guitar), Justin Sullivan (drums), and Cyrus Gengras (bass). Recorded near Stinson Beach, California, and produced by the ubiquitous Richard Swift, the album greatly benefits from the symbiotic relationship between players and instruments. Duffy’s guitar, in particular, adds layers of texture and melody, ringing softly against Morby’s resonant voice. Though not as guitar-laden as the titular “City Music” or “Crybaby,” the guitar rings in and out of earshot acting as Morby’s past love, glistening organ and drums taking the track to its conclusion.

KEXP presents Kevin Morby performing “City Music” live at The Triple Door as part of KEXP’s VIP Club concert series. Recorded August 21, 2017.

Songs: City Music,  Crybaby , 1234,  Aboard My Train,  Destroyer,  I Have Been To The Mountain, Parade, Downtown’s Lights, Beautiful Strangers,

“Singing Saw”, was the solo album from Los Angeles singer-songwriter (and former Woods bassist) Kevin Morby, was one of the great “growers” of 2016. Dusky and unassuming, it revealed its considerable charms slowly but surely. Morby’s follow up, City Music, mines a similar aesthetic, though its songs in general seem to endear themselves more quickly. Where Singing Saw was inspired in part by Morby’s sleepy neighborhood in the hills northeast of L.A., City Music is about the metropolis: city life, city noise, city people, a city’s pace, and so on.

Morby has said Singing Saw was Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell, while City Music is Lou Reed and Patti Smith, and the comparison is clear in Morby’s speak-sing deadpan and bulging crescendos from brooding guitar-folk to driving rock. (The barreling “1234” makes a beeline for the Ramones.) City Music doesn’t hustle and bustle. But it won’t let you miss it, either so cool.

Kevin Morby’s title track off his excellent record, “City Music” nearly hits the 7-minute mark and challenges what fans may have come to expect from him. The song builds like a slowly accelerating subway train, as does this deeply impressionistic video.

Kevin Morby “City Music,” from his album, ‘City Music’, out 6/16 on Dead Oceans Records

Kevin Morby has shared the new black and white video for single ‘Downtown Lights’ taken from his latest album City Music

The video, directed by Hugo Jouxtel of La Blogothéque, was shot in Paris and features Morby wandering the striking streets handing our white flowers to Parisians.

“Paris has always shown a lot of love towards my music, and I am very grateful,” Morby said. “On my first European solo tour I was selling maybe 50 tickets a city until I showed up in Paris and heard the show was already at 150 tickets, which at the time really blew my mind and took me by complete surprise. Before the show, a company called La Blogothéque asked me to do a ‘Take Away Show,’ which I agreed to do, though I didn’t really know what it was. The film crew was so kind and took me on a magical adventure around the city filming me playing some songs in a park and in a boat going down the canal,” he continued.

“Two years later, I was back in Paris and they asked me to film a show playing to a small crowd inside a house next to Père Lachaise Cemetery and that, too, was very magical. So when it came time to do a video for ‘Downtown’s Lights’ I knew just who to ask. La Blogothéque has a way of capturing the meeting of artists and a city half way, letting them both do the work and play off of each other and the result is always fascinating.”

Kevin Morby “Downtown’s Lights,” from his album, ‘City Music’, out now on Dead Oceans:

Image may contain: one or more people and guitar

Kevin Morby has shared his new video for ‘Aboard My Train’, the new single off his forthcoming album, City Music. Morby, who self-directed the video for his new song, said: “I wanted to make a video at home, something sort of lo-fi.

“I kind of missed the challenge of having to come up with something creative with little to no money. Doing what I do, people are constantly coming in and out of your life. The moment you think you’ll never see someone again, they reappear and that’s what this song is about starting with my first best friend, Pablo, who lived on my street in Tulsa, and was my first memory of having a best friend.”

In the video, Morby writes the names of many of these people who have made lasting impressions on his life:

Kevin Morby “Aboard My Train,” from his forthcoming album, ‘City Music’, out 16/6 on Dead Oceans

Kevin Morby has just announced “City Music” a new album via the fine folks at Dead Oceans. Here’s a little more on the album via the PR Team – His fourth album, “City Music” works as a counterpart to Morby’s acclaimed 2016 release “Singing Saw”, an autobiographical set that reflected the solitude and landscape in which it was recorded. Singing Saw was imagined as “an old bookshelf with a young Bob and Joni staring back at me, blank and timeless. They live here, in this left side of my brain, smoking cigarettes and playing acoustic guitars while lying on an unmade bed.”

And now follows City Music, the yang to its yin, the heads to its tails. It is a collection crafted using the other side of its creator’s brain, the jumping off point perhaps best once again encapsulated by an image. “Here, Lou Reed and Patti Smith stare out at the listener,” explains Morby. “Stretched out on a living room floor they are somewhere in mid-70s Manhattan, also smoking cigarettes.” It finds Morby exploring similar themes of solitude, but this time framed by a window of an uptown apartment that looks down upon an international urban landscape “exposed like a giant bleeding wound.”

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