Posts Tagged ‘Casper Skulls’

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Casper Skulls have announced their debut EP, Lips & Skull, The EP arrives at the end of what has been a busy first year of existence for Casper Skulls, who have built a reputation as one of Toronto’s most exciting new bands on the back of their self-released “King of Gold” 7″, their first Buzz Records single “Mink Coats,” and their intense live shows with acts like Perfect Pussy, Dilly Dally, Screaming Females, Suuns and Greys. Following an early 2016 Canadian tour supporting Solids and the Dirty Nil, the band began working on the EP last February with Josh Korody (Dilly Dally, Fucked Up, Beliefs) and producer Shehzaad Jiwani of the band Greys. Inspired by the friendship between Tom Verlaine and Richard Hell as depicted in correspondence between the two reproduced in Hell’s memoir “I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp,” letters from which the band takes its name and the EP gets its title, Lips & Skull captures Casper Skulls at a crucial moment of their development. Vocalist/guitarist Neil Bednis describes the EP as “a document of some of the earliest songs we worked on together,” and as such the EP functions as a snapshot of a young band at a moment of discovery, harnessing for the first time the depth and direction of their considerable potential.

Listen to the track and the EP’s first single “Devotion” it sets the tone for the release, introducing the band at their taut and kinetic best, and illustrating their dynamic range, building tension in between eruptions of the track’s thunderous hook, while exploring for the first time in their recorded material, the interplay between Bednis and the band’s other vocalist Melanie St-Pierre.

“The song traces devotion from its most humble form (devotion to a sports team or a coffee shop) all the way to an American state’s devotion to follow through with capital punishment,”

“Errands” is the follow-up to Casper Skulls’ single “Devotion,” off of the post-punk group’s debut EP Lips & Skull.  On “Errands,” a doleful melodic track practically leaking distortion, the Toronto-based group is weary with jaded humor; vocalist Neil Bednis offers, “Hope I’m in your will/ Who’s a guy gotta kill?” Bednis further offered some background on the song:

The song at a surface level is about having to run errands for someone who has passed away. I was watching Mad Men at the time and Pete Campbell’s father dies in the series. He resented his father in the show and I imagined writing a song about doing errands for someone that died that I didn’t particularly like or get along with. If you look deeper into the narrator of the song and the deceased you see that they are both flawed people. The deceased was ignorant, sexist, and egotistical and ultimately a product of North American capitalism. The narrator is just as imperfect as he has little ability to mourn the death of his father and instead focuses on his monetary gains.

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