FAKE FRUIT – ” I Am the Car “

Posted: August 15, 2021 in MUSIC

“I Am the Car” is the new single from San Francisco-based Fake Fruit, available digitally on Fire Talk imprint Open Tab.  Lead vocalist Hannah D’Amato’s acerbic wit is bitingly emphatic, providing a necessary vantage point into the absurdities and emotion of human connection, and Bandcamp christened the trio “our new no-bullshit harbingers of disgruntled punk.”  The new single takes the best of the band’s keen ear for melody and flips it into an impossibly catchy anthem that full of melancholic yearning.  The band’s “electrifying” (Pitchfork) brand of nervy guitars and call-and-return vocals have made them one of the new names to know in indie rock.

I think it’s pretty safe to say that Fake Fruit’s self titled debut release is one of the better records from earlier this year. Hannah D’Amato’s snarky vocals have a palpable fervour, and their short bursts of post-punk leave their mark instantly. Each song is a sharp-witted distillation of modern-day communication and relationships, and even within their minimal lyricism, they manage to mix in amusing quips about time wasting, men’s rights and social media mutuals. While most of the LP exudes a moody, anxious cool, there was also a faint beauty buried within these songs, most notably on the melancholy “Swing and a Miss.” The Oakland based band brought that sense of longing into full focus on their new one-off single “I Am the Car.” In my mind, not only is it battling it out for the title of my favourite Fake Fruit song (going toe to toe with “No Mutuals”), but also it’s a song of the year contender.

Maybe that sounds dramatic for a track this unassuming, but to view this song as anything but a perfect pop song would be absurd. It’s a departure from their bracing post-punk, and instead sounds like the best C86 song you’ve never heard. Its touching chorus and melodic arc are exceptional, and D’Amato’s sweet, humble vocals absolutely ruined me. D’Amato compares her emotional recalibration to a vehicle tune-up, essentially singing from the perspective of a dependable car, and I’ll be damned if this isn’t the prettiest song ever written from that point of view.

It’s a departure from their bracing post-punk, and instead sounds like the best C86 song you’ve never heard. Its touching chorus and melodic arc are exceptional, and D’Amato’s sweet, humble vocals absolutely ruined me. D’Amato compares her emotional recalibration to a vehicle tune-up, essentially singing from the perspective of a dependable car, and I’ll be damned if this isn’t the prettiest song ever written from that point of view.

The band:

Hannah D’Amato- Vox + Guitars
Alex Post- Guitars + Vox
Miles MacDiarmid- Drums
Martin Miller- Bass

Open Tab, Fire Talk’s new imprint

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.